Archive for the ‘theater’ Category

Fellows Notes – May 17

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

Mass Cultural Council is honored to support the work of individual artists. Fellows Notes is a monthly listing of the last news from awardees in our Artist Fellowships Program.

May 2017:

Hiding in Plain Sight: Folk Masters of Massachusetts showcase concert features past or current recipients of an Artist Fellowship or Traditional Arts Apprenticeship performing at the Shalin Liu Performance Center in Rockport (5/14, 5 PM).

Many superb poets, including numerous past Artist Fellows and Finalists, and taking part in the Massachusetts Poetry Festival (5/5-5/7, Salem, MA). Not to be missed: a reading by Mass Cultural Council Poetry Fellows Scott Challener, Aaron Krol, Richard Michelson, Sarah Sousa, and Elizabeth Witte (5/6, 2 PM), at the Peabody Essex Museum. Other current and past Artist Fellows/Finalist taking part include Tom Sleigh (one of the headliners), Kathleen Aguero, Maria Luisa Arroyo, Carrie Bennett, Duy Doan, Danielle Legros Georges, Regie Gibson, Richard Hoffman, and Rosann Kozlowski. Learn more.

Sophia Ainslie, Ken Beck, Masako Kamiya, Joo Lee Kang, and Mary Kocol are all taking part in the 40th anniversary event at Gallery Naga (5/5, 5-8 PM, after party from 8-11 PM).

Steven Barkhimer, John Kuntz, Melinda Lopez, and John Minigan all have plays published in the New England New Play Anthology (edited by Patrick Gabridge). An event featuring the book takes place at Porter Square Books (5/16, 7 PM).

Congratulations to Sarah Bliss and Allison Cekala, who are among the film artists attending the 2017 Flaherty Film Seminar as LEF New England Fellows.

Charles Coe's poem "Mnemonic" installed as part of Mass Poetry's Raining Poetry project

Charles Coe and Tanya Larkin are among the poets whose work is featured in Mass Poetry’s Raining Poetry project.

Samantha Fields, Matthew Gamber, Masako Kamiya, Justin Kimball, Kelly Popoff, Cristi Rinklin, and Daniela Rivera all received awards from the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation Artist’s Resource Trust Fund.

Kenji Nakayama and Ben Sloat are exhibiting in Absent at the Lesley University VanDernoot Gallery (5/11-6/10, opening reception 5/11, 6-8 PM).

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Elizabeth Alexander currently has work in the exhibition Deep Cuts: Contemporary Paper Cutting at Currier Museum of Art (thru 5/21). She has solo show, I May Not Be a Lion, at Hodges Taylor Art Consultancy (thru 6/18), with an artist talk 5/20, 10:30 AM-12 noon, moderated by Annie Carlano, Senior Curator of Craft, Design and Fashion at The Mint Museum. Work from her Heirloom series is currently featured in the touring State of the Art exhibitions from Crystal Bridges Art Museum.

Stacey Alickman has a solo exhibition, In Memory: works by Stacey Alickman, at Kingston Gallery (5/3-5/28, opening reception 5/5, 5:30-8:30 PM).

Steven Bogart directs Peerless for Company One Theatre (C1), performed at the Boston Public Library (thru 5-28, 7 PM). All tickets are pay-what-you-can in this production, produced in conjunction with the Library’s “All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare.”

Sarah Braman is part of the group exhibition In the Abstract at MASS MoCA (opening reception 5/6, 5:30-7 PM).

Mark Cooper recently showed at Lesley University’s Lunder Art Center. Read a review in WBUR’s ARTery.

John Gianvito screened his film Profit motive and the whispering wind at Harvard Film Archive (5/1, 7 PM), part of its Cinema of Resistance series.

Sean Greene is exhibiting in Eye of the Song: Visual Art by Musicians at The Putney School’s Michael S. Currier Center Gallery (thru 5/20).

Carrie Gustafson exhibited in The Smithsonian Craft Show in April.

Mags Harries has a solo exhibition, Adrift, at Boston Sculptors Gallery (5/10-6/11, opening reception 5/20, 5-8 PM).

James Heflin‘s debut poetry collection Krakatoa Picnic has been published by Hedgerow Books.

Catherine Kernan has a solo show, perimeters, at Soprafina Gallery (5/5-5/27, artist’s reception 5/13, 2-4 PM).

Dawn Kramer will perform in an event called From the Horse’s Mouth, a benefit for The Dance Complex (5/5 and 5/6).

Jesse Kreitzer‘s film Black Canaries received “Special Jury Recognition for Short Narrative Film” at the Ashland Independent Film Festival (AIFF). This marks the 8th film festival award for Black Canaries.

Mira T. Lee is part of The Strategic Writer panel for the Muse and the Marketplace Conference (5/7, 1-2:30 PM).

Danielle Legros Georges reads her poetry in the Brookline Poetry Series at the Brookline Public Library (5/21, 2 PM).

Mary Lum has an exhibition, Assembly (Lorem Ipsum), at MASS MoCA (thru 5/28).

Matthew Mazzotta currently has work at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum NYC in a show called By the People: Designing a Better America. Read an ArtSake article about his recent project, Cloud House.

Cecelia Raker‘s play La Llorona will be produced by Fresh Ink Theatre at Boston Playwrights’ Theatre (5/5-5/20).

Abraham Ravett‘s film Holding Hands with Ilse screened in the Massachusetts Multicultural International Film Festival at UMASS Amherst in April.

Marian Roth has a 20-year retrospective, On Bended Light, at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (5/5-7/16, opening reception 5/12, 6 PM).

Congratulations to Jim Shepard, who won the Rea Award, a $30,000 prize for a short story writer.

Leslie Sills has an exhibition of paintings, Sanctuary, at Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury, Vermont (thru 6/25, artist talk 6/22, 6 PM).

Elaine Spatz-Rabinowitz has an exhibition, Arctic Abrasions, at Miller Yezerski (thru 5/23).

Jeff Warmouth will offer a presentation as part of the exhibit Games and Politics at Boston Cyberarts (5/17, 7-9 PM).

Debra Weisberg recently completed 22-ft long commission for Facebook Cambridge Office. Read more on ArtSake.

Linda K. Werthheimer wrote an essay for WBUR’s Cognoscenti about how her mother broadened her experience with diverse cultures.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Charles Coe’s poem “Mnemonic” installed as part of Mass Poetry’s Raining Poetry project.

Fellows Notes – Apr 17

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

In April, a shower of news from past and present MCC Artist Fellowship awardees.

 

Natalie Alper, Anne Neely, Jo Ann Rothschild, and Maxine Yalovitz-Blankenship are part of the group exhibition Expanding Abstraction: New England Women Painters from 1950 to Now at the deCordova Museum (4/7-9/17).

MCC Artist Fellowship Program awardees Colleen Coyne, Cynthia Gunadi, Thomas McNeely, and Rosalind Pace read at Porter Square Books (4/21, 7 PM).

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Amy Archambault created the installation Hideout at Boston Children’s Museum (thru 6/18). Read about the installation in The Boston Globe.

Steven Bogart directs Peerless for Company One Theatre (C1), performed at the Boston Public Library (4/27-5-28, 7 PM). All tickets are pay-what-you-can in this production, produced in conjunction with the Library’s “All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare.”

Meryl Cohn‘s play The Final Say is part of the Smith College New Playreading Series (4/6, 7:30 PM).

Nicole Duennebier‘s paintings are featured in Hi-Fructose, a contemporary art magazine.

Beth Galston has a solo exhibition, Luminous Garden, at the Mattatuck Museum, Waterbury, CT (thru 7/17).

Christy Georg will give a slide lecture at Santa Fe Clay (4/14, 1 PM) about her project Great Guns, one of the most ambitious projects attempted in the 43-year history of the Kohler Arts/Industry Residency Program. Read about the project in ArtSake.

James Heflin‘s debut poetry collection Krakatoa Picnic will be published by Hedgerow Books (5/1).

Robert Knox‘s novel Suosso’s Lane, based on the Plymouth, Mass. origins of the infamous Sacco-Vanzetti case, was published by Web-e-Books as an ebook in late 2015. The paperback edition was published in April 2016. Robert discusses the novel at the Ventress Memorial Library in Marshfield (4/13, 7 PM). His first poetry collection, Gardeners Do It With Their Hands Dirty, is scheduled for publication later this month by Finishing Line Press. He reads from the collection at Plymouth Public Library (4/24, 7 PM). Currently, he is a contributing editor to the online poetry journal Verse-Virtual.com, and he currently has poetry published in the March edition.

Niho Kozuru‘s sculpture Longfellow Column has been acquired for the permanent collection of the Fuller Craft Museum. The mold for Longfellow Column comes from a balustrade at the Cambridge home of poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Danielle Legros Georges reads at the Rozzie Reads Poetry/Open Mic at Roslindale House (4/27, 7 PM).

Yary Livan, master ceramist and National Endowment for the Arts Heritage Fellow, returns to the Loading Dock Gallery in April with One Man’s Journey: Restoring a Lost Tradition(3/29- 4/30).

Stephanie Lubkowski‘s solo viola piece Avanc will be performed in the Equilibrium Concert Series as part of their commissioning project concert at the New School of Music in Cambridge (4/15, 8 PM).

Rania Matar‘s work will be part of The Photography Show at AIPAD with Pictura Gallery in NYC, and of the exhibition Action at a Distance at Angela Meleca Gallery, in Columbus, OH. She has an artist talk at Gund Gallery at Kenyon College (4/4, 4 PM), coinciding with her current Mellon artist-in-residency and with the exhibition Aftermath: The Fallout of War — America and the Middle East.

Nathalie Miebach is exhibiting in State of the Art, Discovering American Art Now at the Mint Museum in Charlotte NC (4/22-9/3). She is also giving artist talks at Crystal Bridges Museum, part of a symposium called “Art in Conversation: Environment, Identity and Memory” (4/7-4/8), and at Broward College in Fort Lauderdale, FL as part of their “Future Environments” lecture series (4/19).

James Morrow and his company james morrow/The Movement present a free House Dance Jam at the Boston Center for the Arts Calderwood Pavilion 4/8, 6 PM).

Congratulations to Ethan Murrow, who won the 2017 Brooke and Hap Stein Emerging Arts Prize from the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville. This month, his solo show The Cowboy will exhibit at Winston Wachter Gallery in Seattle (4/18-6/20, reception 4/18 6-8 PM).

Abraham Ravett‘s film Holding Hands with Ilse will screen in the Massachusetts Multicultural International Film Festival at UMASS Amherst (4/19, 7:30 PM).

Monica Raymond wrote the texts for two songs, Snow Queen and The Garden in the Snow (composed by Charles Turner) to premiere at an all-day arts festival at Arts at the Armory (4/14).

Susan Rivo‘s documentary Left on Pearl has its official premiere at the Boston International Film Festival in the Paramount Center’s Bright Family Room (4/14, 5:30 PM).

Dawn Southworth has a solo exhibition of paintings and sculpture, Premonition, at Clark Gallery (4/4-5/9, reception 4/8, 4-7 PM).

Peter Snoad‘s documentary play, The Draft, about personal experiences with the Vietnam War draft, is now available on DVD and streaming through the Media Education Foundation. The play was filmed in performance during its premiere at Hibernian Hall in Roxbury where Peter was Visiting Playwright from 2013-15. Peter returns to Hibernian Hall when his short play Apple Pie is performed by Roxbury Repertory Theatre as part of its “Six Playwrights in Search of a Stage” festival (4/15-4/16).

Laurel Sparks is among the artists exhibiting in Witches at September Gallery in Hudson, NY (thru 5/7). Laurel will participate in an event, Witches Performance Night, on 4/22, 6–8 PM.

Joyce Van Dyke has a staged reading of her new play The Women Who Mapped the Stars at Central Square Theater (4/17, 8 PM). There will be a workshop production at the same theatre in May/June. Her play Daybreak will have a staged reading (4/21, 7:30 PM) at Pan Asian Repertory Theater in New York. Her new play Ballad for Americans will have a staged reading at Northeastern University (5/1).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: trailer for LEFT ON PEARL by Susan Rivo, premiering this month at the Boston International Film Festival.

Announcing 32 Awards in Crafts, Dramatic Writing, and Sculpture/Installation/New Genres

Monday, January 30th, 2017

Mara Superior, THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS (2014), porcelain, wood, gold leaf, 24x20x15 in

The Massachusetts Cultural Council is honored to announce the 2017 Artist Fellowship awards in Crafts, Dramatic Writing, and Sculpture/Installation/New Genres. Sixteen artists will receive fellowships of $12,000, and 16 artists will receive $1,000 finalist awards. See a list of this year’s fellows and finalists, to date.

The awards are anonymously judged, based solely on the artistic quality and creative ability of the work submitted. Applications were open to all eligible Massachusetts artists. A total number of 561 applications were received; 141 in Crafts, 135 in Dramatic Writing, and 285 in Sculpture/Installation/New Genres.

Evan Morse, SEB AND CLAIRE ILLEGALLY STREAM A MOVIE (2016), Hydrocal, pigment, 9x18x15 in

The Crafts panelists were Honee A. Hess, Ji-Eun Kim, Daniel Kornrumpf, and Beth McLaughlin. The Dramatic Writing panelists were Maria Agui Carter, Anne G. Morgan, and Rebecca Noon; the Readers were Steven Bogart and Talaya Delaney. The Sculpture/Installation/New Genres panelists were Nicholas Capasso, Dana Filibert, Jen Mergel, and Allison Maria Rodriguez.

This is the first series of Artist Fellowships awards to be given by the Mass Cultural Council in 2017. In late May 2017, MCC will announce awards in Film & Video, Music Composition, and Photography.

Find a full list of 2017 Artist Fellowships awardees, to date.

Nora Valdez, LONG PATH (2013), Limestone and marble, 12x52x7 in

From the Off-Broadway production of EXPATRIATE by Lenelle Moise, photos by Vanessa Vargas

Images: Mara Superior (Crafts Fellow ’17), THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS (2014), porcelain, wood, gold leaf, 24x20x15 in; Evan Morse (Sculpture/Installation/New Genres Fellow ’17), SEB AND CLAIRE ILLEGALLY STREAM A MOVIE (2016), hydrocal, pigment, 9x18x15 in; Nora Valdez (Crafts Fellow ’17), LONG PATH (2013), limestone and marble, 12x52x7 in; from the Off-Broadway production of EXPATRIATE by Lenelle Moise (Dramatic Writing Fellow ’17), photos by Vanessa Vargas.

Fellows Notes – Jan 17

Monday, January 9th, 2017

Each month, we share the news and honors of Artist Fellows & Finalists. Here’s the newest, in this new month of the new year.

Cover art for BEFORE YOU by Rebecca Doughty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017)

Regie Gibson, Letta Neely, Monica Raymond, and David Valdes Greenwood are among the artists whose work will be performed at Pinning Our Hopes, an evening of poems and scenes exploring the years ahead under the new president. The show, which is curated by David Valdes Greenwood, has two performances (1/14, 4 PM and 8 PM) and is free/donation-based.

Marky Kauffmann and Rania Matar both have photography in Outspoken: Seven Women Photographers at the de Menil Gallery at Groton School (opening reception 1/18, 7 PM). Marky Kauffmann curated the exhibition.

Kenji Nakayama and Ben Sloat are among the artists in the exhibition All That Glitters Is Not Gold at Drive-by Projects (1/28-3/11, reception 1/28, 4-6 PM).

Rachel Perry, Joe Wardwell, and Deb Todd Wheeler are among the artists exhibiting in Loud and Clear at Miller Yezerski Gallery (1/6-2/7).

Daniela Rivera and Evelyn Rydz are both exhibiting in latinx@mericañaza at Samson Projects.

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Kati Agócs had the U.S. premiere of her string quarter Tantric Variations, performed by the Cecilia String Quartet on Stradivari instruments, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. in December.

Alexandra Anthony has a one-week theatrical run of her film Lost in the Bewilderness in Athens, Greece (1/12-1/18) at the Alkyonis Art Cinema. National Greek TV (ERT) will broadcast the film 1/15. The film’s December premiere in Greece received press attention in Madame Figaro and THETOC.gr.

Carrie Bennett has poetry in Issue 30 of jubilat.

Steven Bogart has a staged reading of his play Rehearsal at First Church in Boston Unitarian Universalist (1/24, 7 PM).

David Bookbinder has recently published two books: 52 (more) Flower Mandalas (an adult coloring book collaboration with Mary O’Malley) and Paths to Wholeness: Fifty-Two Flower Mandalas.

Rebecca Doughty has a new picture book, Before You, which will have a book launch event at Joie de Vivre in Cambridge (1/15, 4-6 PM).

Michael Dowling co-wrote the feature film Brave New Jersey, and it’s screening at the Berkshire Film Festival (1/12, 6 PM reception, 7 PM screening, q&a to follow).

Samantha Fields has a performative sculptural installation in the exhibition Is this Something at the Lasell College Wedeman Gallery (1/24-2/11, reception 1/29, 4-6 PM). Next summer, she will be Artist-in-Residence at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin.

Sean Greene has a solo exhibition, Impulse Control, at the Williston Northampton School Grubbs Gallery (thru 1/30, reception 1/14, 1 PM).

Carrie Gustafson is exhibiting in the New York Ceramics and Glass Fair (1/18-1/22).

Michael Hoerman‘s poems “Disoriented Fascination,” “The God-box Killer,” and “The B-side of Stuxnet,” published in Eureka Literary Magazine, were nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

Eric Hofbauer‘s album Three Places in New England (with The Eric Hofbauer Quintet) was named one of the Boston Globe’s Top Ten Jazz Albums of 2016.

Joel Janowitz has a solo exhibition, Protected Trees, presented by Cambridge Arts at Gallery 344 (1/23-4/7, reception 1/30, 6-8 PM).

Niho Kozuru is among the artists in Plastic Imagination Fitchburg Art Museum (thru 1/15).

Scott Listfield is exhibiting in Supersonic Invitational (New York City), Platinum Blend 3 at Modern Eden Gallery (San Francisco), BRINK at Antler Gallery (Portland), and a Rick and Morty-themed exhibition at Gallery 1988 in LA.

Caitlin McCarthy is included in the book The Top 100 Indie Writers in the World.

Nathalie Miebach is in the group show Weather or Not, That Is the Question at the Children’s Museum of New York City (1/16-5/23). She’s also exhibiting in Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in America at the University of Missouri Museum of Art and Archeology (1/27-5/14).

Anna Ross has a poem, Back Porch Aubade, published on Harvard Review Online.

Evelyn Rydz‘s exhibition Floating Artifacts is at Tufts University Art Gallery (1/24-5/21, opening reception 1/26, 5-7:30 PM). As mentioned above, she’s also exhibiting in latinx@mericañaza at Samson Projects.

Jenine Shereos has a solo show of new work, Thaw, at Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston (1/14-3/8, reception 2/25, 5-7 PM).

Karen Skolfield won the Jeffrey Smith Editors’ Prize in poetry at Missouri Review.

Shubha Sunder wrote about the writing workshop experience for the Grub Street’s GrubWrites blog.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: cover art for BEFORE YOU by Rebecca Doughty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017).

Fellows Notes – Nov 16

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

It’s November, a month to vote, eat sweet potato casserole, and celebrate new art.

Here’s the latest news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Liza Bingham, CARTOON CONTRAIL (2016), acrylic and oil on muslin over panel, 14x20 in

Claire Beckett, Caleb Cole, and Stephen Tourlentes will participate in an Artadia Art & Dialogue event with Whitney Museum of Art Curator Elisabeth Sherman (11/9, 6:30-8:30 PM) at the MassArt Design and Media Center Lecture Hall.

MCC Artist Fellowship Program awardees Kathleen Brennan, Anna V.Q. Ross, and Gary Whited read at the Public Library of Brookline (11/15, 7 PM).

Michael Joseph and Molly Lamb are both included in PhotoLucida’s Critical Mass 2016 Top 50 list.

Congratulations to Georgie Freidman and Emily Lombardo, both of whom are among the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) 2017 Traveling Fellows.

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Kati AgocsThe Debrecen Passion is Music Web International’s Recording of the Month. Two songs from the album are up for consideration on the 2017 Grammy ballot.

Liza Bingham has a solo exhibition of paintings, Hot Pink, Soft Pink, Rusty Orange, White, at the new Boston project space and gallery How’s Howard (11/4-12/11, opening reception 11/4 5-9 PM).

Janet Echelman will give a presentation, Soft Structure: Sculpting at the Scale of Cities, hosted by the MIT Department of Architecture, on 11/17, 6-8 PM.

Georgie Friedman has work in Constructed Video at Boston Cyberarts Gallery (11/12-12/18, reception 11/11, 6-8 PM). Also, she has a site-specific video installation at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Traces of Wind and Water (thru 11/14), with “Artist Hours” at the site 11/6, 5-6:30 PM. (See news about the artist’s award from SMFA, above.)

Raul Gonzalez has a solo exhibition of drawings and paintings, Forbidden Frontera, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (11/2-12/21, reception 11/4 5:30-7:30 PM).

Justin Kimball has a solo exhibition of photography, Elegy, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (11/2-12/21, reception 11/4 5:30-7:30 PM). Signed copies of Justin Kimball’s book Elegy will be available for purchase.

Niho Kozuru has a solo show, Positive Vibration, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 11/15, opening reception 11/4, 5-8 PM).

Danielle Legros Georges will read at the MIT Stata Center (11/7, 7 PM) and at Porter Square Books (with Kirun Kapur and Steve Yarbrough, 11/11, 7 PM). Her book The Dear Remote Nearness of You was awarded the 2016 Sheila Motton Book Prize by the New England Poetry Club. She will be sitting on the panel “New Directions in Caribbean Poetry” at the Miami Book Fair (11/20).

Scott Listfield is among the artists in Lunar Attraction (thru 9/4/2017) at Peabody Essex Museum. He’s also in the two-person exhibition Anthropecene at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR. Read an interview with the artist on the gallery’s blog.

Melinda Lopez has a new, one-woman play, Mala, at ArtsEmerson (thru 11/20). In recognition of the playwright’s achievements, Mayor Marty Walsh named October 29, 2016 Melinda Lopez Day in Boston. Read excellent reviews of Mala in the Boston Globe, WBUR’s ARTery, and Boston Magazine.

Rachel Mello has a solo exhibition, That Space Between Flying and Falling at Laconia Gallery (thru 12/18, Artist’s Talk 12/2, 6:30-7 PM).

Nathalie Miebach is exhibiting in the group show Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at Akron Art Museum (thru 1/15). The museum will host a concert featuring work by Boston composers Christian Gentry and Mischa Salkind-Pearl, created in collaboration with Nathalie Miebach (11/3, 7 PM). Also this month, the artist has talks or events at the University of Akron Synapse Art Science Lecture series (11/2), the Sculpture Center in Cleveland (11/4, 11/5) and the New York Art Teacher Association at their annual conference in Albany, NY (11/18).

James Morrow and his dance company, james morrow/The Movement, present A Quarter Past Midnight at the Boston Center for the Arts Calderwood Pavilion (11/11 and 11/12, 8 PM). The performance is part of the dance artist’s Choreography Residency at the BCA.

Carl Phillips will read in the Blacksmith House Poetry Series (11/7, 8 PM).

Monica Raymond was selected as a Visiting Scholar for 2016-2018 at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center. Also, “The Bag Song” from Paper of Plastic (an opera co-created with composer Charles Turner and performed at the Arkansas Science Slam in Oct) won Rough Magic Shakespeare Company‘s First Prize for a science song.

Jo Ann Rothschild is in the group exhibition Painting Is Not a Good Idea at HallSpace in Dorchester (11/19-1/7, opening reception 11/19, 3-6 PM).

Tracy Heather Strain and Randall MacLowry‘s film company, The Film Posse, created The Battle of Chosin, the latest documentary on the PBS series American Experience.

August Ventimiglia is among the artists in Wood + Paper + Earth at Drive-By Projects (11/5-12/17, reception 11/5, 4-6 PM).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show at LaMontagne Gallery in Winchester (thru 11/11) and another exhibition, Soon I Will Be President at Southern New Hampshire University McIninch Art Gallery (11/3-12/17, opening reception and artist talk 11/3, 5-7 PM).

Elizabeth Whyte Schulze‘s exquisite basketry, described as “three dimensional paintings,” are the Spotlight Exhibition at Mobilia Gallery (thru 12/15).

Suara Welitoff has an exhibition of multimedia and installation work, What Time This Feels at 186 Carpenter in Providence, RI (thru 12/10).

Cary Wolinsky has a solo exhibition of photography, Cary Wolinsky: Fiber of Life at Fuller Craft Museum (thru 2/26).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Liza Bingham, CARTOON CONTRAIL (2016), acrylic and oil on muslin over panel, 14×20 in.

Fellows Notes – Oct 16

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

October-y news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Shelley Reed, ON THE WALL (AFTER HONDECOETER) (2010), oil on canvas, 48x36 in

Caleb Cole, Dana Filibert, Shelley Reed, and Sarah Wentworth are among the artist exhibiting in Fertile Solitude at the Mills Gallery at Boston Center for the Arts (10/14-12/18, opening reception 10/14, 6-8 PM). The exhibition, curated by FLUX.Boston creator Elizabeth Devlin, explores the idea of reprieve from everyday life through the physical framework of a maze that exhibition visitors are free to explore.

MCC Artist Fellows and Finalists will read at Forbes Library in Northampton (10/19, 7 PM). The readers are D M Gordon, Heather Kamins, Richard Michelson, Sarah Sousa, and Elizabeth Witte. Learn more and find the event on Facebook.

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Sachiko Akiyama has a solo exhibition of paintings and sculptures, Sachiko Akiyama: Between Here and There, at Matter & Light Fine Art (thru 10/31).

Alexandra Anthony‘s film Lost in the Bewilderness screens at the Robbins Library in Arlington, MA (10/20, 7 PM), as part of the Arlington International Film Festival’s 2016 Robbins Library Monthly Film Series. Free and open to the public, Q & A with Alexandra Anthony to follow.

Alice Bouvrie is screening her film A Chance To Dress at MIT (10/13, 7 PM). The filmmaker along with the subjects of the film, Dr. John “Tephra” Southard and his wife, Rev. Jean Southard, will be present for a post-screening Q & A.

Matt Brackett‘s first solo show in Boston in four years will take place at Alpha Gallery (10/7-11/2, opening reception 10/7, 6-8 PM). One of the included paintings, Moonstone, was one of 35 works out of over 2,400 applicants to receive a Certificate of Excellence in the Portrait Society of America’s International Portrait Competition last spring. See the artist’s Studio Views post on ArtSake.

Charles Coe is among the artists selected for the Boston Artists-in-Residence Program.

Mary Jane Doherty will have the West Coast premiere of her documentary Primaria at the San Francisco Dance Film Festival (10/23, 2 PM).

Tory Fair has a solo show of drawing/sculpture hybrids, Tory Fair: Paperweight at VERY in Boston (thru 10/22).

Jake Fried‘s animation was featured on the science technology/pop culture blog io9.

Georgie Friedman has unveiled a site-specific video installation at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Traces of Wind and Water (thru 11/14), part of her work as a City of Boston Artist in Residence Program. There is a Boston AIR reception 11/14 at the Strand.

Beth Galston has a solo show at the Cynthia Reeves Gallery in North Adams (thru 11/13).

Marky Kauffmann was invited to participate in the Berlin Foto Biennale after being named a finalist in the 2015 Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers. Also, she’ll exhibit in the group show Mirror with a Memory at the Peter Miller Gallery in Providence, RI (10/20-11/12, opening reception 10/20, 5-9 PM).

Lisa Kessler received a George Gund Foundation commission to photograph in the Cleveland public schools. The photography collection will be on exhibit at the Cleveland Public Main Library in downtown Cleveland (thru 10/28). A smaller traveling exhibit will be on display at several library branches around the city.

Colleen Kiely will have a solo show at the Simmons College Trustman Art Gallery (10/11-11/9, opening reception 10/20, 5-7 PM, artist’s talk 10/26, 12-1 PM). She’ll also have work in the pop-up exhibit Stark Naked at Gallery Kayafas, 10/16, 7-10 PM.

Niho Kozuru has a solo show, Positive Vibration, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 11/15).

Dawn Kramer, along with Stephen Buck, will participate in this year’s Roslindale Open Studios (10/22-10/23).

Yary Livan was featured in the Lowell Sun.

Melinda Lopez has a new play, Mala, at ArtsEmerson (10/27-11/20). Also, she contributed a short play to Still Waiting a series of vignettes created to accompany the play Waiting for Lefty at Boston College Robsham Theatre (10/13-10/16).

Tara Masih is the Series Editor for the annual Best Small Fictions series, which just published the 2016 edition.

Rania Matar has photography in the exhibition Mortal Things: Portraits Look Back and Forth at Tufts University Art Center (thru 12/4). Her solo show Becoming: Girls, Women, and Coming of Age exhibits at Pictura Gallery in Bloomington, IN (10/7-11/26, opening reception 10/7 5-8 PM, artist talk 10/11, 7 PM). In December, that same gallery will exhibit Rania’s work in Pulse Miami. Her work is included in Aftermath: The Fallout of War – America and the Middle East at Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville, FL (thru 12/ 31. artist talk 10/23, 2 PM) Her work is also exhibiting at Galerie Janine Rubeiz, Beirut Lebanon and at C. Grimaldis Gallery

Mary Bucci McCoy is in the experimental group exhibition Fiction (With Only Daylight Between Us) at boeckercontemporary in Heidelberg, Germany (10/15-31). Also, she will have a public conversation with Brooklyn artist David Mann at Rafius Fane Gallery in SoWa, Boston (10/8, 2-4 PM).

Joshua Meyer has a solo show, Seek My Face: The Art of Joshua Meyer, 2000-2016 at The Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA (thru 12/23, reception 10/27, 7-9 PM).

Richard Michelson was featured in WBUR Radio for his children’s book about Leonard Nimoy, Fascinating.

Nathalie Miebach is in the group show Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at Akron Art Museum (thru 1/15). Also, she’ll give a talk at Ohio Wesleyan University (10/19, 7 PM) as part of the Sagan National Colloquium.

Ethan Murrow has a large-scale wall drawing in Escape Routes at the John Michael Kohler Art Center in Sheboygan, WI (thru 1/15). See an interview about the process.

Jendi Reiter‘s debut novel Two Natures was published in September by Saddle Road Press. Broadside Bookshop in Northampton, MA is hosting her local book launch (10/19, 7 PM).

Jo Ann Rothschild will exhibit work in the Fall Open House at the Studio at 535 Albany Street in Boston (10/27, 5-8 PM).

Samuel Rowlett has a solo exhibition of recent multimedia work, A Thing Not Planned for Imagery or Belief, on view in the South Gallery at Greenfield Community College (thru 11/3). There will be a gallery talk 10/26, 12 PM, and a closing reception 11/2, 5:30-7 PM.

James Rutenbeck‘s film Class of ’27 is an Editor’s Pick from The Atlantic.

Jane Smaldone‘s exhibition Rocks & Roses and The Return of the Fox shows at Clark Gallery in Lincoln (thru 10/31).

Stephen Tourlentes has work in the group exhibition Surveillance at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO (thru 1/29).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show at LaMontagne Gallery in Winchester (thru 11/11) and another exhibition, Soon I Will Be President at Southern New Hampshire University McIninch Art Gallery (11/3-12/17, opening reception and artist talk 11/3, 5-7 PM).

Cary Wolinsky has a solo exhibition of photography, Cary Wolinsky: Fiber of Life at Fuller Craft Museum (10/8-2/26, opening reception 11/6, 2-5 PM).

Jung Yun reads from her novel Shelter at Busboys and Poets in Washington, D.C. in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (10/5, 6-8 PM), sponsored by the Asian/Pacific Islander Domestic Violence Resource Project.

Angela Zammarelli is exhibiting in the group show The Unity of Opposites at A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton, MA (thru 10/30, opening reception 10/14, 5-8 PM). She is currently in residence at The Studios at MASS MoCA and will be participating in an open studios 10/19, 5-7 PM.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Images and media: Shelley Reed, ON THE WALL (AFTER HONDECOETER) (2010), oil on canvas, 48×36 in; Alexandra Anthony’s interview from the 40 Years of Fellowships Project.

Historic Artist Opportunities

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

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Of Note: The National Museum of African American History & Culture has opened in Washington DC.

Poets Entries are now being accepted for the New Criterion’s Poetry Prize of $3,000 and publication by St. Augustine’s Press. The prize is given annually for a poetry collection that pays close attention to form. Erica Dawson, Roger Kimball, and David Yezzi will judge. Submit a manuscript of up to 60 pages with a $25 entry fee byVisit the website for complete guidelines. Learn more.
Deadline:  September 30, 2016

Artist Business Grants MASS MoCA’s Assets for Artists program is seeking Boston-based applicants for its Matched Savings Program, which supports creative entrepreneurs with a matching grant and artist-focused business and financial training. Eligible applicants must have a home or studio address in the City of Boston. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Poets, Fiction Writers Entries are currently being accepted for the University of Massachusetts Press Juniper Prizes. Four prizes of $1,000 each and publication by University of Massachusetts Press are given annually for a first poetry collection, a poetry collection, a short story collection, and a novel or novella. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Short Fiction Entries are now being accepted for the University of Iowa Press Short Fiction Awards. Two awards of publication by University of Iowa Press are given annually for first collections of short fiction. Writers who have not published a book of fiction are eligible. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

MCC Artist Fellowships The Massachusetts Cultural Council is currently accepting Artist Fellowship applications for Crafts, Dramatic Writing, and Sculpture/Installation/New Genres. Artist Fellowships are unrestricted, anonymously judged grants for Massachusetts artists in recognition of artistic excellence. Fellowship awards are currently $12,000. Finalist awards are $1,000. Learn more.
Deadline: Monday, October 3, 2016

STARS Residencies The Massachusetts Cultural Council’s STARS Residencies Program (Students and Teachers Working with Artists, Scientists, and Scholars) provides grants of $500-$5,000 to schools to support creative learning residencies of three days or more in the arts, sciences, and humanities. Learn more.
Application opens October 6, 2016 at 4pm

Videos, Animations, Computer Generated Work Proposals for the next round of Art on the Marquee are currently being accepted. Looking for work 30 second videos, animations or computer generated work, that use the entire Marquee in creative ways. Please submit a storyboard, statement, work samples, and CV to info@bostoncyberarts.org The call is limited to artists who live anywhere in the state of Massachusetts. Learn more.
Deadline: October 16th, 2016 (midnight)

Boston Choreographers The Boston Foundation and The Aliad Fund have announced Next Steps for Boston Dance, a new grant program that provides multi-layered support for Boston-area choreographers creating original work in any genre. Offers 250 hours of rehearsal space; 6-10 consultations with experts in chosen areas of need/interest; $5,000 in implementation funds for the artist to take a “next step” in his/her work or career; a series of cohort meetings to connect choreographers, build relationships, and allow for co-learning. A minimum of three grants will be awarded in this pilot round/first year of Next Steps. Learn more.
Deadline: Oct 24, 2016 at 5pm

Ten-minute Plays Submissions of ten-minute plays by New England playwrights are now being accepted for the Boston Theater Marathon XIX to be held May 14, 2017, at the Stanford Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts. Learn more.
Deadline: November 15, 2016

Writing Conference Scholarships If you’re interested in attending Muse and the Marketplace, GrubStreet’s national conference for writers, in Boston Spring 2017 but could use financial support, GrubStreet is offering numerous $250 scholarships for attendees. Learn more.
Deadline: November 21, 2016

Image credit: Circa 1940s: “Miss America.” (Joe Schwartz). From the photography collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

New Artist Opportunities in Boston and Beyond

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

 

We’ve been excited to see a number of new funding and support opportunities for Boston/New England artists announced recently. Here’s a brief rundown.

New England Dance Fund
The New England Foundation for the Arts (NEFA) announced its New England Dance Fund, which awards “small, catalytic grants directly to choreographers who identify and articulate a critical opportunity that will significantly advance their career in dance.” The program, which aims to strengthen the dance sector in the region, is in addition to NEFA’s existent portfolio of support for dance artists. The next deadline to apply is September 26, 2016.

Assets for Artists in Boston
Assets for Artists is a unique program that offers financial and entrepreneurial training to artists as well as an innovative matched savings grant program. It’s administered by MASS MoCA with a host of partnering and sponsoring orgs (including us). This year, the City of Boston joins as a partner, providing dedicated funding for 10 matched savings grants (from $1,000 – $2,000 each) for Boston-based artists, and financial and business workshops to strengthen the professional skills of those 10 artists and others. Deadline to apply is September 30, 2016.

The Boston Foundation’s Next Steps for Boston Dance
The Next Steps for Boston Dance program aims to support Greater Boston choreographers with access to rehearsal space, consulting meetings with expert advisors, cohort/collaborator meetings, and $5,000 in funding. The deadline to apply is October 24, 2016, 5 PM EST.

The Boston Foundation’s Live Arts Boston (LAB)
The Live Arts Boston (LAB) program will provide up to $15,000 in flexible, project-specific support to artists in dance, theater, spoken word, performance art, circus arts, some music genres, and inter- or multi-disciplinary combinations. Priority will be given to projects that emphasize new work, culturally-specific work, unique and interdisciplinary partnerships/collaborations, or risk-taking and innovative programming. The launch date is September 30, 2016, and the deadline will be November 15, 2016, 5 PM EST.

The Boston Cultural Council’s Opportunity Fund
The Opportunity Fund is designed to support individual artists living or working in Boston to “share their work with the public or teach others, continue professional development, and hone their skills.” Applications for grants up to $1,000 will be accepted on a monthly basis. Artists can apply here, and grants will be distributed every month except October and April, when other Boston Cultural Council grants applications are due.

 

If you have a program to benefit Massachusetts artists that you’d like us to share, we’re all ears.

Media: excerpt from CLOTHESLINE AS LIVE INSTRUMENT by Dahlia Nayar (Choreography Fellow ’16), a past recipient of support from NEFA’s dance initiatives.

Charlotte Meehan: Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness

Wednesday, September 14th, 2016

Charlotte Meehan, Artistic Director of Sleeping Weazel and a past contributor to ArtSake, is about to premiere a new play, Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness: a User’s Guide at the Boston Center for the Arts. Here, she shares how her personal background and the country’s “mad time” have shaped her new work for the theatre.

(l-r): Veronica Anastasio Wiseman, Stephanie Burlington Daniels

Some thoughts on the state of our union… and theatre’s place within it

The opening of my new multimedia play, Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness: A User’s Guide, is a singular experience in my life as a playwright, as I consider this production a social intervention during a particularly mad time in U.S. culture. Who would have predicted two years ago when I began researching and developing the script that Donald Trump was about to descend on the scene of a national election and eventually win the Republican nomination for the highest office in the country (and some say the world)?

During these past two years, we have also seen a rise in police brutality against African Americans, or at least an increase in the reporting of it, along with rapidly multiplying acts of gun violence and mass shootings the likes of which this country has never before seen. I have asked myself, over and over, what is going on here? To boot, the daily rounds of hate speech this election cycle provides is starting to remind me of my childhood on the right wing fringe in which my father, a regional leader in The John Birch Society, would frequently say, “terrorism is the answer.” For entertainment value, he threatened on a regular basis (and even once at my cousin’s wedding) to bomb the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

Charlotte Meehan, photo by Tina HoweAs I grew into adolescence, I came to realize that my parents’ way of life – their right wing extremist political views and their Pre-Vatican II religious zealotry – were far outside the social norms of the day. This was the 1970s in Levittown, Long Island, where they were also part of the parents group that fought to ban books, including The Catcher in the Rye, in the Island Trees public school district. I was not even attending public school and yet my parents were intent on “being involved” in community efforts to rid the country of whatever they considered sinful ideas. The principal and the priest at the draconian Catholic school I attended convinced my parents that I had “liberal tendencies” and should not be sent to college where I would gravitate towards the Marxists and Jews. I guess they were right about that, at least.

In Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness: A User’s Guide, I portray two Christian housewives who found The Movement to Restore Decency (aka MOTOREDE) and find themselves falling into sexual escapades with each other. In the midst of all this, they decide to buy some guns, they get into big trouble with their pretty awful (onscreen only) husbands, and they even begin chatting with the real God, who is far more reasonable than their fundamentalist Christian leaders would have them believe. It’s mayhem through and through, conveying at every turn the impossibility of adhering to an outmoded morality system no one actually upholds. In real life, my mother and her friend did actually found MOTOREDE, but the story turned out differently for them. Rather than getting “the hots” for each other, as happens in the play, my mother’s friend took up with the local Chief of Police and left her family for him.

Without giving too much away, the play also deals head-on with news stories of today, particularly regarding gun violence, and employs Acts of God to snap its characters back into some semblance of reality, from which they quickly retreat, once the ground beneath them feels solid again. Sadly, this is all so close to what’s happening in mainstream politics at the moment that I hardly see it as an exaggerated version, constructed for dramatic effect, of life as we know it. All I can think is that the past eight years with our first African American President, a diplomat and an intellectual, have threatened some to such an extent that they are willing to support a crazily greedy, megalomaniac to be the next leader of this country. However, like President Obama, I generally believe that progress will continue, even as the tidal waves of ignorance and fear try to wash it away.

Through director Robbie McCauley’s clear-eyed vision, Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness provides an invitation to meditate on the insanity and to collectively find a way out of its maze.

Charlotte Meehan
Artistic Director, Sleeping Weazel
September 13, 2016

 

Cleanliness, Godliness, and Madness: A User’s Guide
September 15–17 and 22–24, 2016, 7:30 pm
Plaza Black Box Theatre
Boston Center for the Arts
539 Tremont Street, Boston, MA

Images: (l-r) Veronica Anastasio Wiseman and Stephanie Burlington Daniels from CLEANLINESS, GODLINESS, AND MADNESS; Charlotte Meehan, photo by Tina Howe.

Art from Surprising Places

Friday, July 8th, 2016

Maybe it’s the unremarkable visit to the grocery store that sparks an idea for a new project. Or the stultifying job that drives frantic art-making at night. Sometimes, unexpected places prove crucial to the artistic process, be it in the inspiration, the making of, or both.

As part of our periodic questions to artists about their work and lives, we asked: Has a surprising or unusual locale ever proven a boon to your art-making?

Cover art from THE POINT OF VANISHING (Beacon Press, 2015) by Howard Axelrod

Howard Axelrod, writer
Several readers have asked whether I wrote my memoir, The Point of Vanishing, which is about living in solitude in northern Vermont, while I was living in solitude in northern Vermont. I didn’t. I wrote it mostly in a house just outside of Boston, in my apartment on the third floor, in a room facing a busy street, the windows closed against the noise of deliveries at the local taqueria, and the blinds closed against the sun. Readers tend to find this image, rather than the romantic one of a writer at a rough-hewn desk overlooking the mountains, disappointing.

But the outpost that inspires writing isn’t necessarily conducive to it. To write, it helps me to be in a place that doesn’t call for my attention — to be above a street I can easily forget and then easily return to, to be in a place whose grandeur is less than that of the place I’m writing about. Of course, it helps to have traveled back from a place, like the northern Vermont woods, that I can’t help but remember.

Cecelia Raker, playwright
I am not a morning person. I have visions of my someday self awakening with the sunrise birds and blissfully churning out pages with a cup of steaming tea… yeah, nope, that’s not me. I will stay up until 3am and then sleep until 1pm if you let me. I try not to let me, because of weird stuff like human relationships and day jobs.

I am, however, an airplane person. I remember as a kid staring for hours out the tiny windows, making up stories about the towering clouds’ lives. I love the whoosh of takeoff, the stomach-scramble of turbulence, the patchwork of little lives laid out below.

Unfortunately, given that I’m also an artist on a tight budget, I most often end up on airplanes that leave very early in the morning – cranky, disheveled, exhausted. These seats are not a bed. The air smells recycled. Nothing is beautiful or inspiring. Put that window down, I’m trying to sleep.

So imagine my surprise when I discovered by accident that crack-of-dawn air travel seems to be the exact cocktail I need to write more prolifically than I ever do while grounded. Something about being suspended in a fragile metal wing-can miles above my planet makes me believe that anything I make while in that space won’t be too significant—and somehow that short-circuits my usual loop of procrastination and perfectionism, and I land with a journal full of decently usable and sometimes even funny scenes. I wish airlines had writers’ residencies.

Stephen Mishol, visual artist
My drawings are studio fictions but much of the catalyst for this grew out of my time living in Boston’s South End, on the edge of all the construction that was taking place there at the time. Even though my work doesn’t document a specific place and depends on collections of information from many places, the qualities of that landscape informed much of my work and still does to this day – the diffused light, the compression of forms, and the manner in which the city seemed to reinvent itself on a daily basis.

In that environment, it was easy to experience extreme change – from the open horizon of the sea, to the congestion of the city. In addition, over time, as the landscape became more fused with construction, it developed a very muscular ability to redirect and alter progress and perception as one traveled through it.

Eventually, I came to view the city more as an equation of division and accumulation, reflecting shifts in aesthetics, politics and necessity. To this day, my drawings are still influenced by that time and like that environment, I continue to see them as equations in the process of defining themselves.

Stephen Mishol, SOFT HORIZON (2015), Graphite on paper, 22x30in

 

Howard Axelrod is the author of the memoir The Point of Vanishing: A Memoir of Two Years in Solitude. His writing has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Shambhala Sun, and the Boston Globe, among other publications, and he has taught at Grub Street in Boston.

Stephen Mishol is a visual artist who teaches at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell. He has received MCC fellowships in both Drawing & Printmaking and Painting and is represented by Miller Yezerski Gallery in Boston.

Cecelia Raker is a 2016 PlayLab Fellow with Company One Theatre in Boston. Her play “La Llorona,” which recently received an Honorable Mention on the 2016 Kilroys List, will have a reading at Company One on July 24. The play will go on to have a workshop at Fresh Ink Theatre in September, with a full production planned for May ’17.


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