Archive for the ‘photography’ Category

What Do You Strive to Avoid in Your Art?

Monday, March 6th, 2017

Periodically, we pose questions to artists about issues they face in their work and lives.

We were curious about ruts, pitfalls, or other counter-productive things from which artists make a conscious effort to steer clear. So we asked, What do you work hardest at trying to avoid in your work?

The answers range from technical or material concerns, issues of art history, creative decisions, and (in one case) become a poetic expression all their own.

Mara Superior, AMERICANA (2016), porcelain, salt glazed white stoneware, 14.5x18x2 in

Mara Superior, ceramicist
My material is porcelain, and there are so many technical issues and things that could go wrong all along the way before a piece is completed. As I’m making, I’m always trying to avoid mishandling the materials.

Porcelain is a high-risk material because it shrinks about 15 percent. Working with it is all about timing, moisture content, construction, drying slowly then bisque firing. I am interested in the beauty of the final product. I bear with the process.

To add a little more excitement into the mix, I work with an atmospheric kiln which means the results are not consistent each time as it might be in an electric kiln. As I work I am imagining the ideal outcome. There is always an adjustment and surprise when the kiln is opened.

Esthetically speaking I try to avoid being too decorative, although I love ornament. I try to balance beauty and content. I believe that some difficult content delivered in a beautiful package is intriguing and alluring.

 

Scott Challener, poet
avoidance procedures

comfortable writing

harmlessness…

READ the poet’s visual-poetic response

 

Marky Kauffmann, MAGGIE: DISINTEGRATION, from the LOST BEAUTY series

Marky Kauffmann, photographer
It is really important to me to make photographs that have an originality of expression. Of course, I understand that being original is impossible. We all stand on the shoulders of the artists who have come before us. Perhaps what I’m calling originality is really creativity – having a strong creative element in my work, something no one else has thought to try. By combining darkroom techniques and digital technologies in a unique manner, I try hard to avoid having my work look like someone else’s. If someone says to me, “Your work looks like so and so’s,” I know I have failed to accomplish what I set out to do.

At the same time, whatever technical devices I use, I want them to make sense in my work. I want to avoid cheap tricks at all costs. This can be a delicate balancing act, but I strive to speak forcefully, purposefully, and skillfully with all the tools in my toolbox.

 

Shubha Sunder, writer
Thomas Mann put it this way in The Magic Mountain: “There are so many different kinds of stupidity, and cleverness is one of the worst.” As a writer of fiction, I work hard to avoid cleverness in my work. This means being on the lookout for things like heavy-handed metaphors, striking images that fail to resonate with the themes of the story, or sentences that twist themselves into pretzels to convey, in the end, what could be said in a few simple words. Cleverness is not the same as complexity, when the world on the page reflects and illuminates the messiness of real life. That sort of effect comes not from clever technique but from a deep exploration of characters and situations. I used to delight in showing off my pyrotechnics as a writer; now, I’m obsessed with doing everything possible to immerse a reader into the world of the story – to make the words disappear, rather then stand out.

 

Evan Morse, SEB AND CLAIRE ILLEGALLY STREAM A MOVIE (2016), hydrocal, pigment 9x18x15 in

Evan Morse, sculptor
My earliest sculptural works were so close to historical precedents that what I thought was a commentary on the past seemed to most people to be merely copying the past. Most people can’t not think Greek, Roman, Renaissance, or Rodin when they see a marble nude. This has been my struggle throughout the youth of my sculptural career and is the thing that I am continually seeking to avoid in my work. How do I make art that speaks for itself first, and its historical counterparts second? How do I make figurative sculpture that builds upon history rather than repeats it? Not to mention that all the aforementioned acts are tough ones to follow…

After some searching and experimentation, I realized that the traditional methods and materials are important to me. Taking part in the millennia-long visual conversation in the representation of the human figure is important to me. This means that the content of my work has to be strong enough on its own to both embrace its historical allusions and seem original at the same time. It’s a fine line to walk, and I’m working to avoid the pitfalls all the time.

 

Scott Challener is a doctoral candidate in Rutgers University. His most recent poems appear in the online publication Pangyrus (out of Cambridge) and Lana Turner Journal.

Marky Kauffmann is a photographer who curated Outspoken, an exhibition of seven female photographers that recently closed at the de Menil Gallery at Groton School. The show will travel to the Hess Gallery at Pine Manor College in Chestnut Hill next fall.

Evan Morse‘s sculpture has been exhibited at Boston City Hall, Danforth Art in Framingham, and Heritage Museums & Gardens in Sandwich, among many other venues.

Shubha Sunder‘s fiction has been appeared in Crazyhorse magazine, where it won the 2015 Crazyhorse Fiction Prize; Narrative Magazine, where it was a winner of “30 Below, Michigan Quarterly Review, and The Bangalore Review. She teaches at GrubStreet and recently completed her first novel, Boomtown Girl.

Mara Superior has received five awards from the Artist Fellowships Program since 1986. Her ceramic work is currently on exhibit in A Sense of Place, the 73rd Scripps Ceramic Annual exhibition at the Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery in Claremont, CA.

Images: Mara Superior, AMERICANA (2016), porcelain, salt glazed white stoneware, 14.5x18x2 in; Marky Kauffmann, MAGGIE” DISINTEGRATION, from the LOST BEAUTY series; Evan Morse, SEB AND CLAIRE ILLEGALLY STREAM A MOVIE (2016), hydrocal, pigment 9x18x15 in.

Fellows Notes – Mar 17

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

It’s March, the equator is about to pass by the center of the sun (happy Spring Equinox), and our past Artist Fellowships awardees continue to shine with honors, exhibitions, readings, and so much more. Here’s the latest news.


Lisa Nilsson, from the 40 Years of Fellowships project. This month, the artist exhibits at the Currier Museum of Art

 

Elizabeth Alexander, Ambreen Butt, Fred H C Liang, Lisa Nilsson, Jane South, Randal Thurston, and August Ventimiglia are among the artists featured in Deep Cuts: Contemporary Paper Cutting at the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester, NH (thru 5/21.)

Laura Chasman and Leslie Sills join Nancy Gruskin for the exhibition Life: from life at room83 Spring in Watertown (3/9-4/22, reception 3/11, 3-5 PM).

Frannie Lindsay and Lynne Potts read as part of the Brookline Poetry Series at the Brookline Public Library Main Branch in Brookline Village (3/19, 2 PM).

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Sophia Ainslie has an exhibition of paintings at the Boston City Hall Mayor’s Art Gallery, in conjunction with Women’s History Month (thru 3/31).

Simeon Berry reads at the Gloucester Writers Center (3/15, 7:30 PM).

Ben Berman will read from his new poetry collection Figuring at the Figure at Brookline Booksmith (3/16, 7 PM).

Sarah Bliss curated and is presenting From the Farm at the Alchemy Film & Moving Image Festival in Scotland. From the Farm is a curated program of 13 films made at the Independent Imaging Retreat (aka Film Farm) offered in rural Ontario every summer by Canadian experimental filmmaker Philip Hoffman and his dedicated staff.

Ria Brodell has a solo show of paintings, Butch Heroes, at
Gallery Kayafas (3/3-4/8, opening reception 3/3, 5:30-8 PM). She’ll also be releasing the limited edition book Butch Heroes: Paintings by Ria Brodell, with book signing and panel discussion 3/18, 3 PM.

Kim Carlino has a solo exhibition, The Primary Line, (3/1-3/28), at the UMass Amherst Herter Art Gallery.

Lucien Castaing-Taylor and collaborator Véréna Paravel, who are among the Foster Prize Artists at the ICA Boston, will give an in-gallery Foster Talk (3/16, 7 PM).

Caleb Cole has a solo show of photography, To Be Seen, at Gallery Kayafas (3/3-4/8, opening reception 3/3, 5:30-8 PM).

Harriet Diamond has a new installation, Driven from their Homes, at the Oxbow Gallery (3/2-3/26, reception 3/10, 5-8 PM, artist talk 3/23, 7 PM).

Congratulations to Duy Doan, winner of the 2017 Yale Series of Younger Poets competition. The poet’s manuscript We Play a Game was selected by Series judge Carl Phillips.

Mary Jane Doherty is screening two of her early films, Gravity and Three Fish, as well as an excerpt of a new work, Sonic Boom Boom, as part of the DocYard Series at Brattle Theatre in Cambridge (3/20, 7 PM).

Andrew Haines has an exhibition of paintings, Distracted Driving, at Clark Gallery (thru 4/1, reception 3/4, 4:30-7 PM).

Shannon Heaton has a new podcast, Irish Music Stories, available on iTunes. This month, she performs in Portland, ME (3/17, 7 PM) and Medford, MA (3/18, 8 PM).

Joo Lee Kang has a solo show VictoriANimals at Gallery NAGA (3/3-3/25, opening reception 3/3, 6-8 PM).

Congratulations to Stefan Lanfer, whose play Prudence was selected to be part of a first ever reading of new plays at American Stage in Tampa, FL. Locally, the play will have public readings by the open theater project at Bella Luna Café (3/20) and by the Emerson Theatre Collaborative in CT (4/8) in April.

Stephanie Lubkowski‘s composition Right now, in a second will be performed by Transient Canvas at the Music Mansion in Providence, RI (3/3, 8 PM) and at the Equilibrium Concern Series at Third Life Studio in Somerville (3/4, 8 PM). Also, the Charles River Wind Ensemble will premiere all three movements of Stephanie’s wind ensemble piece Circles Circling at the Scottish Rite Masonic Museum and Library in Lexington (3/13, 3 PM).

Richard Michelson‘s children’s book Fascinating: The Life of Leonard Nimoy was awarded the 2017 Sydney Taylor Silver Medal from Association of Jewish Librarians and a 2016 Junior Library Guild Gold Medal. His just-published picture book The Language of Angels received a 2017 Junior Library Guild Gold Medal. Richard will reading from my work in Seoul, South Korea (3/30) and at the Poetry Center at PCCC in Paterson NJ along with Mark Doty (4/1).

Nathalie Miebach has an artist talk/concert at the Clay Center for Arts and Sciences in Charleston, WV (3/22, 5-7 PM). It will will include musical performances by composers Mischa Salkind-Pearl and Matthew Jackfert, who have both written pieces about Nathalie’s work. Also this month, she’ll present artist talks at Winchester High School and Abington High School.

Stephen Mishol has a solo exhibition, Place at the Neiman Center at Columbia University School of the Arts (thru 3/17). His work is also featured in DRAW/Boston at the Massachusetts College of Art (thru 3/4).

Congratulations to Ethan Murrow, whose children’s book The Whale, co-created with Vita Murrow, was selected for the Longlist for the 2017 Kate Greenaway Medal.

Anne Neely is in the group exhibition Thinking About Water: Artists Reflect (3/22-6/30, opening reception 3/22, 7-9 PM) at The Metropolitan Waterworks Museum in Boston.

Brad Nelson has a solo exhibition This Tells Me Where I Am, at frosch&portmann in New York City (3/0-4/23, opening reception 3/9, 6-8 PM).

Masha Obolensky‘s play Marvelous Fruit will be read at Boston Playwrights’ Theatre (3/19, 7 PM).

Gabriel Polonsky will screen and hold a director’s talk for his film Release from Reason (3/11, 3-5 PM), in conjunction with the Life: from life at room83 Spring Gallery. The documentary, currently in-progress, is about the life and work of Boston Expressionist painter Arthur Polonsky (the filmmaker’s father).

Monica Raymond recently returned from a three-week residency at the Atlantic Center for the Arts, where she showed work as part of an exhibit of Erasure Texts and read new poems and performed improvised poetry and music as part of INsideOUT (3/9). She will be reading poems from the sequence A Walk on Norfolk Street (set in Cambridge 2013, around the Boston Marathon bombings) at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center (3/28, 3 PM), part of a daylong symposium Women’s Sense of Place.

Shelley Reed has a solo exhibition, A Curious Nature, at Fitchburg Art Museum (thru 6/4, opening reception 3/12, 2-5 PM).

Tara Sellios has a solo exhibition of photography, Testimony, at Blue Sky Gallery in Portland OR (3/2-4/2, reception 3/2, 6-9 PM, artist talk 3/3, 12 PM).

Laurel Sparks is among the artists exhibiting in Witches at September Gallery in Hudson, NY (3/18-5/7, opening reception 3/18, 6-8 PM).

Naoe Suzuki has recently returned from a month-long residency at the Tokyo Wonder Site. Currently, she’s exhibiting in Cloudlands at the Albany International Airport (thru 7/31).

Cam Terwilliger‘s as yet unpublished novel Yet Wilderness Grew in My Heart is the winner of the 2017 Caledonia Novel Award.

Sarah Wentworth‘s photograph Rugosa Window, is one of the pieces in the Maud Morgan Art Center Chandler Gallery‘s 2017 Small Works Salon (3/20-4/14, reception 4/2, 3-5 PM). The exhibition was juried by gallery owner Howard Yezerski.

Kris Willcox‘s essay Love and Compost will soon be published in the Portland Review.

Evan Ziporyn was featured in WBUR’s ARTery for his orchestral version of David Bowie’s album Blackstar.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: interview with Lisa Nilsson, from the 40 Years of Fellowships project. This month, the artist exhibits at the Currier Museum of Art.

Fellows Notes – Feb 17

Monday, February 6th, 2017

Fevrier, Febrero, Februar… presenting this month’s news from awardees of our Artist Fellowships Program.

Jenine Sheroes, THAW (2015), site-specific installation at at Jamaica Pond in Boston, Massachusetts

Sonia Almeida and Lucien Castaing-Taylor are among the artists recognized by the ICA Boston James and Audrey Foster Prize 2017. Their work will part of the ICA’s Foster Prize exhibition (2/16-7/9).

Samantha Fields, Andrew Mowbray, and Bob Oppenheim have work in Stitch: Syntax/Action/Reaction at the New Art Center in Newton (2/16-3/31, reception 2/16, 6-8 PM). The exhibition is part of the Curatorial Opportunities Program; Samatha Fields co-curated the exhibition with Jessica Burko.

Dana Filibert and Naoe Suzuki are among the artists exhibiting in Cloudlands at the Albany International Airport (thru 7/31, reception 2/17 5:30-7:30 PM).

Kenji Nakayama and Ben Sloat are among the artists in the exhibition All That Glitters Is Not Gold at Drive-by Projects (thru 3/28).

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Alexandra Anthony‘s film Lost in the Bewilderness had a theatrical run at Alkyonis New Star Cinema in Athens, Greece. The run was extended 11 more days than originally planned and opened at a second theatre, New Studio Art Cinema, as well.

Karl Baden has a solo exhibit of recently rediscovered prints, Thermographs 1976, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (2/11-3/14, reception and gallery talk 2/11, 3-5 PM).

Mary Bucci McCoy has a solo exhibition, Terra Recognita at Jane Deering Gallery in Gloucester (thru 2/26). She’s also exhibiting in Combined at Gray Contemporary in Houston (thru 2/18).

Kim Carlino has a solo exhibition, The Primary Line, at the UMass Amherst Herter Gallery (2/28-3/27, reception 3/1, 5-7 PM). She’s also recently launched a new website.

Vico Fabbris had a painting, Azumacea, featured on Linda Hoffman’s Apples, Art, and Spirit Blog.

Kieran Jordan has opened a new dance studio space in Hyde Park. She’ll have a New Studio Open House (2/26, 12-4 PM), with live music and pop-up performances.

Rania Matar is exhibiting her photography series Invisible Children at PhotoMed Liban in Beirut (thru 2/8). The series was recently reviewed by Hyperallergic and Photograph Magazine. She will also exhibit in the group exhibition Aftermath: The Fallout of War – America and the Middle East at The Gund Gallery at Kenyon College (thru 4/20). Rania is artist-in-residence at Kenyon College this coming semester, thanks to a Mellon Foundation supported artist residency. She’s also exhibiting in Becoming at RayKo PhotoCenter (thru 2/21) and Outspoken: Seven Women Photographers at the de Menil Gallery at Groton School.

Richard Michelson‘s picture book Fascinating has been selected for as a Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People 2017 by the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) and the Children’s Book Council.

Nathalie Miebach has work in two exhibitions opening this month: Art of the Weather at the Clay Center for Arts and Sciences in Charleston, WV (2/4-8/15), and Crooked Data: (Mis)Information in Contemporary Art at University of Richmond Museum, (2/7-5/5).

Monica Raymond‘s short play Hijab (with Adrianjne Krystansky) will have a reading at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center (2/16, 12:30 PM). It’s part of a program, HIJAB and Notes From the Field, that will discuss the cultural significance of women’s veiling around the world. Also, Monica’s monologue Ernesto had a staged reading at Theater Iati (NYC) in January.

Shelley Reed has a solo exhibition, A Curious Nature, at Fitchburg Art Museum (2/12-6/4). Her painting Predator/Prey (after Oudry) will also be the fulcrum of the group exhibition A Feast of Beasts (2/12-9/3).

Renee Ricciardi is the curator of The Uncertainty Principle, an exhibition about “Chance, Wonder, & Quantum Mysteries by Emerging New England Photographers” at the Fort Point Arts Community Gallery (2/8-2/22, reception 2/16, 5:30-7:30 PM).

Anna Ross has a poem, Back Porch Aubade, published on Harvard Review Online.

Sage Schmett exhibits her sculptural work in Hoarder Vacui at the Harvard Ed Portal Crossings Gallery (thru 2/24).

Jenine Shereos has two solo exhibitions in MA: Thaw, at Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston (thru 3/8, reception 2/25, 5-7 PM); and Im/material: Cloth in Collaboration with Nature, at UMass Amherst Hampden Gallery (2/26-3/27, reception 2/26, 2-4 PM).

Deb Todd Wheeler, along with exhibiting in Loud and Clear (thru 2/7) at Miller Yezerski Gallery, will perform with her band The LENNYcollective the Lily Pad in Cambridge (2/4, 8 PM).

Jung Yun is a finalist for the 2016 Barnes and Noble Discover Awards.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Jenine Sheroes, THAW (2015), site-specific installation at at Jamaica Pond in Boston, Massachusetts.

Fellows Notes – Jan 17

Monday, January 9th, 2017

Each month, we share the news and honors of Artist Fellows & Finalists. Here’s the newest, in this new month of the new year.

Cover art for BEFORE YOU by Rebecca Doughty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017)

Regie Gibson, Letta Neely, Monica Raymond, and David Valdes Greenwood are among the artists whose work will be performed at Pinning Our Hopes, an evening of poems and scenes exploring the years ahead under the new president. The show, which is curated by David Valdes Greenwood, has two performances (1/14, 4 PM and 8 PM) and is free/donation-based.

Marky Kauffmann and Rania Matar both have photography in Outspoken: Seven Women Photographers at the de Menil Gallery at Groton School (opening reception 1/18, 7 PM). Marky Kauffmann curated the exhibition.

Kenji Nakayama and Ben Sloat are among the artists in the exhibition All That Glitters Is Not Gold at Drive-by Projects (1/28-3/11, reception 1/28, 4-6 PM).

Rachel Perry, Joe Wardwell, and Deb Todd Wheeler are among the artists exhibiting in Loud and Clear at Miller Yezerski Gallery (1/6-2/7).

Daniela Rivera and Evelyn Rydz are both exhibiting in latinx@mericañaza at Samson Projects.

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Kati Agócs had the U.S. premiere of her string quarter Tantric Variations, performed by the Cecilia String Quartet on Stradivari instruments, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. in December.

Alexandra Anthony has a one-week theatrical run of her film Lost in the Bewilderness in Athens, Greece (1/12-1/18) at the Alkyonis Art Cinema. National Greek TV (ERT) will broadcast the film 1/15. The film’s December premiere in Greece received press attention in Madame Figaro and THETOC.gr.

Carrie Bennett has poetry in Issue 30 of jubilat.

Steven Bogart has a staged reading of his play Rehearsal at First Church in Boston Unitarian Universalist (1/24, 7 PM).

David Bookbinder has recently published two books: 52 (more) Flower Mandalas (an adult coloring book collaboration with Mary O’Malley) and Paths to Wholeness: Fifty-Two Flower Mandalas.

Rebecca Doughty has a new picture book, Before You, which will have a book launch event at Joie de Vivre in Cambridge (1/15, 4-6 PM).

Michael Dowling co-wrote the feature film Brave New Jersey, and it’s screening at the Berkshire Film Festival (1/12, 6 PM reception, 7 PM screening, q&a to follow).

Samantha Fields has a performative sculptural installation in the exhibition Is this Something at the Lasell College Wedeman Gallery (1/24-2/11, reception 1/29, 4-6 PM). Next summer, she will be Artist-in-Residence at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin.

Sean Greene has a solo exhibition, Impulse Control, at the Williston Northampton School Grubbs Gallery (thru 1/30, reception 1/14, 1 PM).

Carrie Gustafson is exhibiting in the New York Ceramics and Glass Fair (1/18-1/22).

Michael Hoerman‘s poems “Disoriented Fascination,” “The God-box Killer,” and “The B-side of Stuxnet,” published in Eureka Literary Magazine, were nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

Eric Hofbauer‘s album Three Places in New England (with The Eric Hofbauer Quintet) was named one of the Boston Globe’s Top Ten Jazz Albums of 2016.

Joel Janowitz has a solo exhibition, Protected Trees, presented by Cambridge Arts at Gallery 344 (1/23-4/7, reception 1/30, 6-8 PM).

Niho Kozuru is among the artists in Plastic Imagination Fitchburg Art Museum (thru 1/15).

Scott Listfield is exhibiting in Supersonic Invitational (New York City), Platinum Blend 3 at Modern Eden Gallery (San Francisco), BRINK at Antler Gallery (Portland), and a Rick and Morty-themed exhibition at Gallery 1988 in LA.

Caitlin McCarthy is included in the book The Top 100 Indie Writers in the World.

Nathalie Miebach is in the group show Weather or Not, That Is the Question at the Children’s Museum of New York City (1/16-5/23). She’s also exhibiting in Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in America at the University of Missouri Museum of Art and Archeology (1/27-5/14).

Anna Ross has a poem, Back Porch Aubade, published on Harvard Review Online.

Evelyn Rydz‘s exhibition Floating Artifacts is at Tufts University Art Gallery (1/24-5/21, opening reception 1/26, 5-7:30 PM). As mentioned above, she’s also exhibiting in latinx@mericañaza at Samson Projects.

Jenine Shereos has a solo show of new work, Thaw, at Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston (1/14-3/8, reception 2/25, 5-7 PM).

Karen Skolfield won the Jeffrey Smith Editors’ Prize in poetry at Missouri Review.

Shubha Sunder wrote about the writing workshop experience for the Grub Street’s GrubWrites blog.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: cover art for BEFORE YOU by Rebecca Doughty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017).

Apply Now for an Artist Fellowship in Film & Video, Music Composition, & Photography

Monday, December 19th, 2016

Image: THE LIGHT UNDER THE DOOR by TSAR FEDORSKY

We’re excited to announce that the Massachusetts Cultural Council is now accepting 2017 Artist Fellowship applications in the categories of Film & Video, Music Composition, and Photography. Deadline: Monday, January 23, 2017.

The Artist Fellowships are unrestricted, anonymously judged, competitive grants of $12,000 and finalist awards of $1,000, in recognition of artistic excellence.

Who should apply for an Artist Fellowship? Massachusetts artists creating original work who meet eligibility requirements (see guidelines) are encouraged to apply. Read our tips on applying for an MCC Artist Fellowship.

We know artists work in ways that are not always easily categorized. If you have any questions where your work might best fit in the program, don’t hesitate to ask us.

 


Play an excerpt from VESSEL by Kati Agócs (Music Composition Fellow ’15)

 

There are two deadlines per fiscal year, divided by discipline, and this is the second deadline. Applications in Crafts, Dramatic Writing, and Sculpture/Installation/New Genres were accepted earlier in 2016, with a October 3, 2016 deadline. Grant results in those categories will be announced by February 2017.

Read full program guidelines, eligibility requirements, and application instructions.

Allison Cekala, still image from FUNDIR (2014)

Still image from MY HEART SWIMS IN BLOOD by John Gianvito (Film & Video Fellow '15)

 

Images and media: Tsar Fedorsky (Photography Fellow ’15), from the series THE LIGHT UNDER THE DOOR (2013), silver gelatin 15×15 in; excerpt from THE VESSEL by Kati Agócs (Music Composition Fellow ’15); still image from FUNDIR (2014) by Allison Cekala (Film & Video Fellow ’15); still image from MY HEART SWIMS IN BLOOD by John Gianvito (Film & Video Fellow ’15).

How Do You Approach Art-making During Times of Emotional Distress?

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

Recently, WBUR had a story about how events out of our control – such as the recent election – create stress and internal turmoil that can disrupt all aspects of our lives.

For artists creating (or trying to create) new work, this can mean a serious disruption of their art-making process. We asked artists, How do you approach art-making during times of emotional distress?

Jodie Mim Goodnough, NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL (2015) from the PROSPECT project, Three Inkjet Prints on Cotton Lawn, 36x78 in

Jodie Mim Goodnough, multidisciplinary artist
My work for years has been about emotional distress, both mild and pathological, and the coping mechanisms we use to self-soothe, so you’d think I’d have all the tools I need. Based on the research for my recent work, what I should be doing is going for long walks in the woods and taking deep breaths of forest air. What I’m actually doing, however, is sitting on the couch reading about how much better I would feel if I went for a walk in the woods.

But if I’ve learned one thing, it’s that you can’t beat yourself up for slowing down occasionally – it only compounds the misery. When I don’t have it in me to hit the studio I do small things in the direction of productivity. I research and I plan for future projects. And I look for non-art tasks that feel productive as well, like studying Spanish. I’m currently living in Providence, which has a large Latino population. I feel like I need to find ways to better connect with people in my community right now, and learning another language, even at a basic level, will help me do that.

Jessica Reik, writer
There are always emotions. Some of them are more uncomfortable for me to be with than others. Some, like elation, feel really good but interfere with my ability to write – elation wants the external and so I’m out doing, not home writing! Fear, sadness, insecurity, they pose different challenges. Seeming bottomless (they never are), they threaten to take over the executive self and with it, all those evolved capacities of the human brain – like perspective – I rely on to write.

I like to sit with a difficult emotion and feel where it’s lodged in my body, then find out what’s underneath. Take fear (often in my lower abdomen). Fundamentally, it’s a lack of basic safety, so I look for that safety in tangible ways and identify what is trustworthy and supportive — my bones, my breath, the chair I’m sitting in. Simple stuff. I like to give structure for the emotion, a house I’ve built for it to roam around in, because the emotion itself isn’t the problem, it’s my reaction to it.

Always, in the end, I find myself in the same place at the end of this process — back to the work. My writing comes out of those very same vulnerable places where sadness takes root — where all emotions do — and yet is also one of the sources of stability that gets me through.

Michael Joseph, photographer
In times of emotional stress, not only making art, but also viewing art can provide a much-needed emotional release. Often my most productive periods are when I feel a need to disconnect with my own internal stressors and reconnect with life that is happening around me. Grabbing my camera and going for a walk breaks up a physically sedentary day but also an emotionally clouded one.

Street photography is unique in that it allows the artist to be present with the world in a way that working in a studio cannot. It shifts our role from being a participant to being an observer. Working on the street has a unique duality: the sometimes frustrating challenge of dealing with the unforeseen but also the excitement and reward of capturing the serendipitous. Events out of our control and uncertainty therefore become positives. By paying close attention to unpredictable actions and emotions of others in fluid environments, we are forced to focus less on our own internal thoughts to capture external narratives in real time.

I always saw the camera as a powerful tool of connection. Making street portraits of strangers whose personalities and places in the world are different from my own, forces me to engage with others and learn from them. It presents the challenge of making their unique, internal story come to the surface through a portrait. There is no time for subjects to look in the mirror, change clothes, fix hair or put on make-up, and I can’t ask the sun to change or the clouds to move… I am forced to make art from what is before me. And in that reality, I make my most powerful work.

Michael Joseph, SOPHIE (2013), archival pigment print, 16x16 in

 

Jodie Mim Goodnough is a Providence, Rhode Island-based artist whose work revolves around the use of images in psychology and psychiatry, and includes photography, sculpture, performance, video and sound. Recently, she received a 2017 Rhode Island State Council on the Arts Fellowship in Photography and was named a 2017 Traveling Fellow by the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University. Her work will exhibit in Building a Lineage at Piano Craft Gallery in Boston, January 2017.

Michael Joseph is a street and street portrait photographer. His “Lost and Found” series, which has been featured on CNN, will be included in the December 8 slide presentation night (Dec 8, 6:30 PM) to complement IDENTITY: The List Portraits at The Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Recently honored in PhotoLucida’s Critical Mass 2016 Top 50 list, he’ll have work in the accompanying exhibition (Apr 7-May 2 at the Artwork Network Gallery Space in Denver). He has an article coming out in the December issue of the Czech Republic magazine CILICHILI. Find him on Instagram and Facebook.

Writer Jessica Reik was awarded a fellowship position in Grub Street’s Memoir Incubator Program, where she worked on the memoir The Fathom-Long Body. Recently, she received a fellowship to attend a Ucross Foundation residency and was named a finalist in StoryQuarterly Non Fiction Prize. On Tuesday, January 17, 2017, at 7 PM, she’ll read her work in an event featuring MCC literary awardees.

Images: Jodie Mim Goodnough, NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL (2015) from the PROSPECT project, three Inkjet Prints on cotton lawn, 36×78 in; Michael Joseph, SOPHIE (2013), archival pigment print, 16×16 in.

Fellows Notes – Dec 16

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Here’s a December-ific roundup of the latest news from MCC’s Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Kelly Popoff, BARRICADE (2015), oil on canvas, 63x88 in

Laura Baring-Gould, Niho Kozuru, and Gretchen Romey-Tanzer are all exhibiting in CraftBoston Holiday (12/2-12/4) at Hynes Convention Center.

David Bookbinder and Mary O’Malley have collaborated on the adult coloring book 52 (more) Flower Mandalas. Mary converted David’s “flower mandala” photographs into illustrations, to color for inspiration and stress relief.

Ryan P. Casey, Wendy Jehlen, and Candice Salyers have all received funding in the inaugural cycle of NEFA’s New England Dance Fund.

Sean Downey, Cristi Rinklin, Joe Wardwell are exhibiting in Irregular Landscapes (thru 2/22, opening reception 12/8, 6-8 PM) at the Hynes Convention Center.

Nicole Duennebier, Asia Kepka, Rachel Mello, Mary O’Malley, and Nina Wishnok are all exhibiting in Plenty at 13 Forest Gallery (thru 1/14).

Warner Friedman, Janet Rickus, and Dawn Southworth at SCOPE Miami Beach with Clark Gallery (12/1-12/4).

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Sophia Ainslie is participating in Vernon Street Open Studios (12/3-12/4). She also has work in Holiday Smalls at Gallery NAGA (12/17). Recently, she completed a commissioned mural for the lobby of Enso Flats in Brockton.

Alexandra Anthony will attend the official Athens, Greece premiere of her film Lost in the Bewilderness (12,15, 7:30 PM, Alkyonis New Star Cinema). Read about the event.

Robert Beavers is among the artists in the 2017 Whitney Biennial.

Ben Berman will have a new book of poems, Figuring in the Figure, coming out from Able Muse Press, March 2017 (now available for pre-order).

Cree Bruins has a solo show, Drawn to Light, at Kingston Gallery (thru 1/1).

Caleb Cole‘s photography exhibition Other People’s Clothes is at the Mayor’s Art Gallery of Boston City Hall (thru 12/9). He’s also exhibiting in Fertile Solitude at the Boston Center for the Arts Mills Gallery (thru 12/18).

Mary Jane Doherty has two upcoming screenings: her dance documentary Secundaria screens at Prince Theater in Philadelphia (12/14, 7 PM), hosted by the Pennsylvania Ballet and Philadelphia Film Society. Her film Primaria has its Latin American premiere at La Festival Internacional del Nuevo Cine LatinoAmericano in Havana, Cuba (12/16, 5:30 PM).

Amy Dryansky reads at Blacksmith House (with Paul Breslin, 12/12, 8 PM), as part of the Blacksmith House Poetry Series.

Congratulations to Janet Echelman, who recently won a fellowship from United States Artists.

Christy Georg has work in the group exhibition Breaking the Block at the Santa Fe Convention Center Community Gallery (12/16-3/2, reception 12/16, 5-7 PM). She is also featured at the New Mexico Museum of Art in the Alcoves series: small one-person exhibitions featuring contemporary artists working in New Mexico (12/9-1/29, reception 12/11, 10:30 AM-12 PM).

Asia Kepka has a booksigning at 13 Forest Gallery (12/8, 6-8 PM) for the book Horace and Agnes: A Love Story, along with co-creator Lynn Dowling.

Jesse Kreitzer has received the James Goldstone Award for Emerging Vermont Filmmaker from the Vermont International Film Foundation, with an awards ceremony 12/15, 7 PM, at the Main Street Landing Film House.

Scott Listfield has work in SCOPE Miami Beach, through Thinkspace Gallery (11/29-12/4).

Rania Matar is exhibiting at PULSE Miami Beach with Pictura Gallery (12/1-12/4).

Rachel Mello has a solo show, That Space Between Flying and Falling, at Laconia Gallery (thru 12/18, artist talk 12/2, 6:30-7 PM).

Kelly Popoff has a solo show, O Children at Herter Art Gallery at UMass Amherst (thru 12/16).

Monica Raymond is part of the first Artists’ Lab at Studio 550 in Cambridge, which is having an end-of-lab open (12/7, 10 AM-1 PM) at 550 Mass Ave, Cambridge.

Jendi Reiter‘s short story “Taking Down the Pear Tree” won the 2016 New Letters Prize for Fiction from the literary journal of the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Susan Rivo‘s documentary Left on Pearl was accepted at the Black Maria Film Festival, with the additional honor of receiving a Director’s Choice Award.

Kay Ruane has an exhibition, Two Drawings, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 12/23, artist reception 12/2, 5-8 PM).

Karl Stevens has a weekly comic strip, Penny, in The Village Voice.

Sarah Wentworth has a solo show of performed photos of Fishline Creature at the St Botolph Club (12/7-1/13, opening reception 12/7, 5:30-7 PM). Also, her work has been included in White Columns’ Artist Registry.

Michael Zelehoski has a solo show, Surface Tension, at Mackin Projects (12/10-1/7, opening reception 12/11, 6-8 PM).

Michael Zelehoski, ANIMISM (2016), assemblage with repurposed wood and florescent bulbs, 65x67 in

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Images: Kelly Popoff, BARRICADE (2015), oil on canvas, 63×88 in; Michael Zelehoski, ANIMISM (2016), assemblage with repurposed wood and florescent bulbs, 65×67 in.

Fellows Notes – Nov 16

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

It’s November, a month to vote, eat sweet potato casserole, and celebrate new art.

Here’s the latest news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Liza Bingham, CARTOON CONTRAIL (2016), acrylic and oil on muslin over panel, 14x20 in

Claire Beckett, Caleb Cole, and Stephen Tourlentes will participate in an Artadia Art & Dialogue event with Whitney Museum of Art Curator Elisabeth Sherman (11/9, 6:30-8:30 PM) at the MassArt Design and Media Center Lecture Hall.

MCC Artist Fellowship Program awardees Kathleen Brennan, Anna V.Q. Ross, and Gary Whited read at the Public Library of Brookline (11/15, 7 PM).

Michael Joseph and Molly Lamb are both included in PhotoLucida’s Critical Mass 2016 Top 50 list.

Congratulations to Georgie Freidman and Emily Lombardo, both of whom are among the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) 2017 Traveling Fellows.

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Kati AgocsThe Debrecen Passion is Music Web International’s Recording of the Month. Two songs from the album are up for consideration on the 2017 Grammy ballot.

Liza Bingham has a solo exhibition of paintings, Hot Pink, Soft Pink, Rusty Orange, White, at the new Boston project space and gallery How’s Howard (11/4-12/11, opening reception 11/4 5-9 PM).

Janet Echelman will give a presentation, Soft Structure: Sculpting at the Scale of Cities, hosted by the MIT Department of Architecture, on 11/17, 6-8 PM.

Georgie Friedman has work in Constructed Video at Boston Cyberarts Gallery (11/12-12/18, reception 11/11, 6-8 PM). Also, she has a site-specific video installation at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Traces of Wind and Water (thru 11/14), with “Artist Hours” at the site 11/6, 5-6:30 PM. (See news about the artist’s award from SMFA, above.)

Raul Gonzalez has a solo exhibition of drawings and paintings, Forbidden Frontera, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (11/2-12/21, reception 11/4 5:30-7:30 PM).

Justin Kimball has a solo exhibition of photography, Elegy, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (11/2-12/21, reception 11/4 5:30-7:30 PM). Signed copies of Justin Kimball’s book Elegy will be available for purchase.

Niho Kozuru has a solo show, Positive Vibration, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 11/15, opening reception 11/4, 5-8 PM).

Danielle Legros Georges will read at the MIT Stata Center (11/7, 7 PM) and at Porter Square Books (with Kirun Kapur and Steve Yarbrough, 11/11, 7 PM). Her book The Dear Remote Nearness of You was awarded the 2016 Sheila Motton Book Prize by the New England Poetry Club. She will be sitting on the panel “New Directions in Caribbean Poetry” at the Miami Book Fair (11/20).

Scott Listfield is among the artists in Lunar Attraction (thru 9/4/2017) at Peabody Essex Museum. He’s also in the two-person exhibition Anthropecene at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR. Read an interview with the artist on the gallery’s blog.

Melinda Lopez has a new, one-woman play, Mala, at ArtsEmerson (thru 11/20). In recognition of the playwright’s achievements, Mayor Marty Walsh named October 29, 2016 Melinda Lopez Day in Boston. Read excellent reviews of Mala in the Boston Globe, WBUR’s ARTery, and Boston Magazine.

Rachel Mello has a solo exhibition, That Space Between Flying and Falling at Laconia Gallery (thru 12/18, Artist’s Talk 12/2, 6:30-7 PM).

Nathalie Miebach is exhibiting in the group show Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at Akron Art Museum (thru 1/15). The museum will host a concert featuring work by Boston composers Christian Gentry and Mischa Salkind-Pearl, created in collaboration with Nathalie Miebach (11/3, 7 PM). Also this month, the artist has talks or events at the University of Akron Synapse Art Science Lecture series (11/2), the Sculpture Center in Cleveland (11/4, 11/5) and the New York Art Teacher Association at their annual conference in Albany, NY (11/18).

James Morrow and his dance company, james morrow/The Movement, present A Quarter Past Midnight at the Boston Center for the Arts Calderwood Pavilion (11/11 and 11/12, 8 PM). The performance is part of the dance artist’s Choreography Residency at the BCA.

Carl Phillips will read in the Blacksmith House Poetry Series (11/7, 8 PM).

Monica Raymond was selected as a Visiting Scholar for 2016-2018 at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center. Also, “The Bag Song” from Paper of Plastic (an opera co-created with composer Charles Turner and performed at the Arkansas Science Slam in Oct) won Rough Magic Shakespeare Company‘s First Prize for a science song.

Jo Ann Rothschild is in the group exhibition Painting Is Not a Good Idea at HallSpace in Dorchester (11/19-1/7, opening reception 11/19, 3-6 PM).

Tracy Heather Strain and Randall MacLowry‘s film company, The Film Posse, created The Battle of Chosin, the latest documentary on the PBS series American Experience.

August Ventimiglia is among the artists in Wood + Paper + Earth at Drive-By Projects (11/5-12/17, reception 11/5, 4-6 PM).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show at LaMontagne Gallery in Winchester (thru 11/11) and another exhibition, Soon I Will Be President at Southern New Hampshire University McIninch Art Gallery (11/3-12/17, opening reception and artist talk 11/3, 5-7 PM).

Elizabeth Whyte Schulze‘s exquisite basketry, described as “three dimensional paintings,” are the Spotlight Exhibition at Mobilia Gallery (thru 12/15).

Suara Welitoff has an exhibition of multimedia and installation work, What Time This Feels at 186 Carpenter in Providence, RI (thru 12/10).

Cary Wolinsky has a solo exhibition of photography, Cary Wolinsky: Fiber of Life at Fuller Craft Museum (thru 2/26).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Liza Bingham, CARTOON CONTRAIL (2016), acrylic and oil on muslin over panel, 14×20 in.

Noritaka Minami: Visions of a Lost Future

Tuesday, October 11th, 2016

Photographer Noritaka Minami creates captivating photography exploring visions of architecture and urban building – visions of a future that never materialized. Work from his 1972 series will be exhibited in the group show Fertile Solitude (Oct 14-Dec 18), opening at the Boston Center for the Arts Mills Gallery on Friday, October 14, 2016, reception 6-8 PM.

We asked the artist about Fertile Solitude, the 1972 series, and other turns and surprises in his photographic explorations.

Noritaka Minami, FACADE (2011), Archival pigment print, 40x50 in

Your projects often explore spaces for which architectural or land use plans have gone in directions that weren’t intended. Can you talk about what draws you to these “unintended” spaces?
In the case of the project 1972, I became interested in the current state of the Nakagin Capsule Tower because it proposed a distinct vision of the twenty-first century that never arrived in the city of Tokyo. In the year 1972, Kisho Kurokawa (the architect of the building) and the Nakagin Mansion Company (the real estate firm that commissioned the building) proclaimed that society was at the “dawn of the capsule age.” Despite this proclamation, this style of building construction did not become popular in Japan. More importantly, the capsules on the tower have never been replaced, even though they were intended by Kurokawa to be replaced every 25 to 30 years as a process of carrying out the building’s “regeneration.” Through photography, I wanted to examine a vision of the future that was imagined to be possible in 1972 and how that vision of the future appears in retrospect. The Nakagin Capsule Tower also allows us to reflect on the actual trajectory taken by the city of Tokyo since 1972. This interest in the limits of foreseeing the future is also the basis of my other recent projects.

Noritaka Minami, B1004 I (2011), Archival pigment print, 20x25 in
What are the project’s origins?
I initially came across the Nakagin Capsule Tower in 2010 through my interest in the 1970 World Exposition, which is commonly known as Expo ’70. Metabolism, an influential post-war Japanese architectural movement that formed at the 1960 Tokyo World Design Conference, played a key role in creating a “city of the future” at the Expo. Yet, there are very few traces of this city left today at the former site of the event. I think that’s why I gravitated towards the Nakagin Capsule Tower. It is one of the few proposals realized through the Metabolism movement that is still standing in this world. The project also began with a sense of urgency to document the building. In 2010, there was a very real possibility that it would be demolished and replaced with a more “conventional” apartment complex to maximize the value of the real estate on which it stands. As of today, the building still faces an uncertain future in regards to its preservation.

How do you see your work in conversation with the other art in Fertile Solitude?
My project documents a building that was conceived by the architect Kisho Kurokawa as a space for businessmen to find respite and rejuvenate from the increasingly rapid pace of life in the city in the post-industrial age. The photographs do show that the capsules still function as a type of shelter from the giant metropolis that exists immediately beyond the circular windows. I am very interested in how my photographs interact with the works of other artists in the exhibition, especially in the “maze” that is being specially designed for the gallery by the curator Elizabeth Devlin. I believe the variety of approaches taken by the artists in this exhibition to address the chaotic nature of contemporary life only reinforces the value of finding introspection. Furthermore, the exhibition will show that this idea of finding introspection comes in different contexts and forms.

Noritaka Minami, B1004 II (2012), Archival pigment print, 20x25 in

Noritaka Minami, A806 II (2013), Archival pigment print, 20x25 in

What artist do you most admire but work nothing like?
I can name many artists I admire that my work has no apparent resemblance or connections to their practices. One example that I can name off of the top of my head is the photographer Rinko Kawauchi because I recently talked about her work in my class at Loyola University. Her photographs, especially from the early books, are stunning. The photographs almost come across as being simple and effortless. Yet, I would have no idea how to make those photographs even if I tried. They’re only possible through her distinct visions for the photographic medium and looking at the everyday. Her photographs highlight the importance of observation and the question of how to translate that act into a photographic image.

What’s the most surprising response to your art you’ve ever received?
It is gratifying when a viewer points out the idea of time in relation to my photographs of the capsules. My project takes into account the history of the capsules as units originally made on an assembly line with similar specifications to enable mass production. In my photographs I use that history of the architecture to highlight the distinct characteristic that now exists within each capsule today, whether it is through the occupancy of the current resident or the modifications that were performed over the course of four decades. Each capsule contains the history of not only the current resident, but also other individuals who have come through that space since 1972 and the decisions they made in regards to that unit. Maybe it’s possible to view the additions, subtractions, modifications, and renovations that were performed inside a capsule as traces of an individual or individuals. It is nice when people look at the details present in each unique space, which is why I took the photographs.

Noritaka Minami, from the CALIFORNIA CITY project (2016)

Noritaka Minami, from the CALIFORNIA CITY project (2016)

What’s next?
I am currently making a work on California City, California, a master planned community in the Mojave Desert conceived by Columbia University trained sociologist turned real estate developer Nathan K. Mendelsohn in the 1950s. The city was intended to become the next major metropolis in California in response to the unprecedented population and economic growths the state experienced following World War II. Mendelsohn and his associates carefully designed the layout of 186.5 square miles of land that is still technically the third largest city in the state in terms of area size. However, most of Mendelsohn’s vision for this city has not been realized to date, despite an extensive network of streets that has already been constructed on the site. I am interested in this landscape that is seemingly suspended in time: clearly being built to host a future city but with no certainty if that city will ever materialize in reality.

Noritaka Minami, FACADE (NIGHT) (2011), Archival pigment print, 24x30 in
Noritaka Minami is among the artists exhibiting in Fertile Solitude at the Boston Center for the Arts Mills Gallery Oct 14-Dec 18, opening reception Friday, October 14, 2016, 6-8 PM.

 

Noritaka Minami‘s photography has exhibited at UCLA Department of Architecture and Urban Design, Center for Photography at Woodstock, and Griffin Museum of Photography. Forthcoming solo exhibitions include the Reischauer Institute at Harvard University and Kana Kawanishi Gallery in Tokyo, Japan. He is a recipient of grants from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, and Center for Cultural Innovation. His 2015 monograph 1972 – Nakagin Capsule Tower (Kehrer Verlag) received the Architectural Book Award from the Deutsches Architekturmuseum. Currently, he is Assistant Professor of Photography at Loyola University in Chicago.

Images: all photographs by Noritaka Minami: FACADE (2011), Archival pigment print, 40×50 in; B1004 I (2011), Archival pigment print, 20×25 in; B1004 II (2012), Archival pigment print, 20×25 in; A806 II (2013), Archival pigment print, 20×25 in; two images from the CALIFORNIA CITY project (2016); FACADE (NIGHT) (2011), Archival pigment print, 24×30 in.

Fellows Notes – Oct 16

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

October-y news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Shelley Reed, ON THE WALL (AFTER HONDECOETER) (2010), oil on canvas, 48x36 in

Caleb Cole, Dana Filibert, Shelley Reed, and Sarah Wentworth are among the artist exhibiting in Fertile Solitude at the Mills Gallery at Boston Center for the Arts (10/14-12/18, opening reception 10/14, 6-8 PM). The exhibition, curated by FLUX.Boston creator Elizabeth Devlin, explores the idea of reprieve from everyday life through the physical framework of a maze that exhibition visitors are free to explore.

MCC Artist Fellows and Finalists will read at Forbes Library in Northampton (10/19, 7 PM). The readers are D M Gordon, Heather Kamins, Richard Michelson, Sarah Sousa, and Elizabeth Witte. Learn more and find the event on Facebook.

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Sachiko Akiyama has a solo exhibition of paintings and sculptures, Sachiko Akiyama: Between Here and There, at Matter & Light Fine Art (thru 10/31).

Alexandra Anthony‘s film Lost in the Bewilderness screens at the Robbins Library in Arlington, MA (10/20, 7 PM), as part of the Arlington International Film Festival’s 2016 Robbins Library Monthly Film Series. Free and open to the public, Q & A with Alexandra Anthony to follow.

Alice Bouvrie is screening her film A Chance To Dress at MIT (10/13, 7 PM). The filmmaker along with the subjects of the film, Dr. John “Tephra” Southard and his wife, Rev. Jean Southard, will be present for a post-screening Q & A.

Matt Brackett‘s first solo show in Boston in four years will take place at Alpha Gallery (10/7-11/2, opening reception 10/7, 6-8 PM). One of the included paintings, Moonstone, was one of 35 works out of over 2,400 applicants to receive a Certificate of Excellence in the Portrait Society of America’s International Portrait Competition last spring. See the artist’s Studio Views post on ArtSake.

Charles Coe is among the artists selected for the Boston Artists-in-Residence Program.

Mary Jane Doherty will have the West Coast premiere of her documentary Primaria at the San Francisco Dance Film Festival (10/23, 2 PM).

Tory Fair has a solo show of drawing/sculpture hybrids, Tory Fair: Paperweight at VERY in Boston (thru 10/22).

Jake Fried‘s animation was featured on the science technology/pop culture blog io9.

Georgie Friedman has unveiled a site-specific video installation at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Traces of Wind and Water (thru 11/14), part of her work as a City of Boston Artist in Residence Program. There is a Boston AIR reception 11/14 at the Strand.

Beth Galston has a solo show at the Cynthia Reeves Gallery in North Adams (thru 11/13).

Marky Kauffmann was invited to participate in the Berlin Foto Biennale after being named a finalist in the 2015 Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers. Also, she’ll exhibit in the group show Mirror with a Memory at the Peter Miller Gallery in Providence, RI (10/20-11/12, opening reception 10/20, 5-9 PM).

Lisa Kessler received a George Gund Foundation commission to photograph in the Cleveland public schools. The photography collection will be on exhibit at the Cleveland Public Main Library in downtown Cleveland (thru 10/28). A smaller traveling exhibit will be on display at several library branches around the city.

Colleen Kiely will have a solo show at the Simmons College Trustman Art Gallery (10/11-11/9, opening reception 10/20, 5-7 PM, artist’s talk 10/26, 12-1 PM). She’ll also have work in the pop-up exhibit Stark Naked at Gallery Kayafas, 10/16, 7-10 PM.

Niho Kozuru has a solo show, Positive Vibration, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 11/15).

Dawn Kramer, along with Stephen Buck, will participate in this year’s Roslindale Open Studios (10/22-10/23).

Yary Livan was featured in the Lowell Sun.

Melinda Lopez has a new play, Mala, at ArtsEmerson (10/27-11/20). Also, she contributed a short play to Still Waiting a series of vignettes created to accompany the play Waiting for Lefty at Boston College Robsham Theatre (10/13-10/16).

Tara Masih is the Series Editor for the annual Best Small Fictions series, which just published the 2016 edition.

Rania Matar has photography in the exhibition Mortal Things: Portraits Look Back and Forth at Tufts University Art Center (thru 12/4). Her solo show Becoming: Girls, Women, and Coming of Age exhibits at Pictura Gallery in Bloomington, IN (10/7-11/26, opening reception 10/7 5-8 PM, artist talk 10/11, 7 PM). In December, that same gallery will exhibit Rania’s work in Pulse Miami. Her work is included in Aftermath: The Fallout of War – America and the Middle East at Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville, FL (thru 12/ 31. artist talk 10/23, 2 PM) Her work is also exhibiting at Galerie Janine Rubeiz, Beirut Lebanon and at C. Grimaldis Gallery

Mary Bucci McCoy is in the experimental group exhibition Fiction (With Only Daylight Between Us) at boeckercontemporary in Heidelberg, Germany (10/15-31). Also, she will have a public conversation with Brooklyn artist David Mann at Rafius Fane Gallery in SoWa, Boston (10/8, 2-4 PM).

Joshua Meyer has a solo show, Seek My Face: The Art of Joshua Meyer, 2000-2016 at The Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA (thru 12/23, reception 10/27, 7-9 PM).

Richard Michelson was featured in WBUR Radio for his children’s book about Leonard Nimoy, Fascinating.

Nathalie Miebach is in the group show Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at Akron Art Museum (thru 1/15). Also, she’ll give a talk at Ohio Wesleyan University (10/19, 7 PM) as part of the Sagan National Colloquium.

Ethan Murrow has a large-scale wall drawing in Escape Routes at the John Michael Kohler Art Center in Sheboygan, WI (thru 1/15). See an interview about the process.

Jendi Reiter‘s debut novel Two Natures was published in September by Saddle Road Press. Broadside Bookshop in Northampton, MA is hosting her local book launch (10/19, 7 PM).

Jo Ann Rothschild will exhibit work in the Fall Open House at the Studio at 535 Albany Street in Boston (10/27, 5-8 PM).

Samuel Rowlett has a solo exhibition of recent multimedia work, A Thing Not Planned for Imagery or Belief, on view in the South Gallery at Greenfield Community College (thru 11/3). There will be a gallery talk 10/26, 12 PM, and a closing reception 11/2, 5:30-7 PM.

James Rutenbeck‘s film Class of ’27 is an Editor’s Pick from The Atlantic.

Jane Smaldone‘s exhibition Rocks & Roses and The Return of the Fox shows at Clark Gallery in Lincoln (thru 10/31).

Stephen Tourlentes has work in the group exhibition Surveillance at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO (thru 1/29).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show at LaMontagne Gallery in Winchester (thru 11/11) and another exhibition, Soon I Will Be President at Southern New Hampshire University McIninch Art Gallery (11/3-12/17, opening reception and artist talk 11/3, 5-7 PM).

Cary Wolinsky has a solo exhibition of photography, Cary Wolinsky: Fiber of Life at Fuller Craft Museum (10/8-2/26, opening reception 11/6, 2-5 PM).

Jung Yun reads from her novel Shelter at Busboys and Poets in Washington, D.C. in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (10/5, 6-8 PM), sponsored by the Asian/Pacific Islander Domestic Violence Resource Project.

Angela Zammarelli is exhibiting in the group show The Unity of Opposites at A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton, MA (thru 10/30, opening reception 10/14, 5-8 PM). She is currently in residence at The Studios at MASS MoCA and will be participating in an open studios 10/19, 5-7 PM.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Images and media: Shelley Reed, ON THE WALL (AFTER HONDECOETER) (2010), oil on canvas, 48×36 in; Alexandra Anthony’s interview from the 40 Years of Fellowships Project.


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