Archive for the ‘NAC16’ Category

Artist’s Voice: Linda Etcoff

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center (NAC) will present the 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts on September 16-October 15, 2016, at the NAC. Linda Etcoff, one of the award-winning artists in the exhibit displays her fecund imagination using charcoal, pastel and crayon.

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Drawing as activity offers me an opportunity to engage in an exploration by utilizing my powers of observation. Through rendering, organizing and manipulating space, I move toward constructing a composition which would otherwise be impossible to imagine in advance. My process concerns developing a spacial construction with an unfamiliar reality having no parallel or corresponding equivalent in nature.

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Using various abstract squiggles and lines to transform my subjects into flat forms of my arrangements. Drawing as action brings me closer to the essential ethos behind the human desire to plant gardens.

See Linda Etcoff’s drawings at the upcoming exhibition 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts. Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 6-8 PM. New Art Center, 61 Washington Park Newtonville, MA, 02460

Image credit: All images courtesy of Linda Etcoff.

 

Artist’s Voice: Andrew Moore

Monday, September 12th, 2016

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center (NAC) will present the 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts on September 16-October 15, 2016, at the NAC. Andrew Moore, one of the award-winning painters in the exhibit, shares how his paintings join the observed world with personal histories, the unseen, and the life of the mind.
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I had been designing this painting of my daughter, Hannah, in my mind throughout her childhood. I wanted this portrait to reveal the physical character that she would carry into her adult life, so I waited until she turned eighteen to begin. The painting is also about her childhood, referencing important elements. In the background is the path to my studio, our small orchard, a split rail fence supporting grapevines and, in the distance, the ocean. Hannah is a young painter and she looks out at you as an artist – studying you and contemplating. I bought the umbrella when I was a teenager. I have always known that I kept it around for something important. There is also a halo suggested in the wear of the umbrella’s linen – I’ve always loved those thin lines of light encircling Leonardo Da Vinci’s and Raphael’s portraits.

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A man lives two days with each one. The first is of the body. Here, man explores his world through his senses. The second day is of the mind, where mind turns physical experience to spiritual understanding and growth. My paintings attempt the whole day – the concrete and the abstract.

I am a New England artist. Important to me is our history of painters whose lives and work are inseparable. As a fisherman, sailor, and self-taught naturalist, I am involved in the changes of season, time and weather and the resulting activities of man and nature in coastal New England. How can an artist not live what he paints? If he does not, his work contains no life.

I am also a representational painter. For me, this tie to the real is not a crutch. Any successful painting must have an abstract strength: a clear understanding of composition, form, color and the many other tools of design. In addition, though, representational painting explores the concrete, the world underfoot. Understanding this world is complex. Stare at a small area of shoreline and consider the materials, textures, colors, shapes, and patterns. Then consider such effects as light, time, season, weather, and what you were thinking about as you stood there. The impression changes. What is the constant? The constant is the whole day, a combination of the abstract and concrete. This is what I attempt to paint.

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See Andrew Moore’s paintings at the upcoming exhibition 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts. Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 6-8 PM. New Art Center, 61 Washington Park Newtonville, MA, 02460

Image credit: All images courtesy of Andrew Moore.

Artist’s Voice: Kim Carlino

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center (NAC) will present the 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts on September 16-October 15, 2016, at the NAC.

Kim Carlino, one of the exhibiting artists, shares how her intuitive paintings and drawings bring disparate elements together.

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I think of myself as an interventionist, mining the space between painting and drawing and being and becoming. I explore the evolutionary nature of mark making and relationships between color, geometry, line and form. Through a pseudo scientific lens of inquiry and exploration I set up a situation on a paper like surface using the language of painting to improvise from. This is an arena in which pattern and form engage and accentuate the contradictions, opposites and contrasts that exist in this fabricated world.

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My work playfully employs shifts of scale, opticality, illusion and disillusion of space and a nonlinear construction of time in hopes of finding equanimity in disparate elements.

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See Kim Carlino’s work at the upcoming exhibition 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts. Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 6-8 PM. New Art Center, 61 Washington Park Newtonville, MA, 02460

Image credit: All images courtesy of Kim Carlino. From top to bottom: Cosmological Formations, series VII XI, Watercolor, ink and highflow acrylic on tyvek. 2015; Cosmological Formations, series VII, IX, Watercolor, ink and highflow acrylic on tyvek. 2015; Above/Below Portal II, Watercolor, ink and high flow acrylic on yupo, 2015.

Artist’s Voice: Erica Daborn

Thursday, September 1st, 2016

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center (NAC) will present the 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts on September 16-October 15, 2016, at the NAC.

Erica Daborn, one of the exhibiting artists, shares how her installations envision a tragic history that’s yet to happen.

Funeral for the Last Elephant

I have been working for six years on this project, Dialogues With Mother Earth: A Journey Through Time and Space. I consider the project to be a response to accelerating and irrefutable evidence of climate change. My goal is to provoke a reflection on the relationship between our 21st century societal values and the ways in which they have contributed to the degradation of our environment. The series of mural-sized narrative drawings in charcoal record fictitious historical events related to climate change as seen from the year 2051.

Seeking Higher Ground

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I am using an immersive form of installation to direct the audience’s response to these issues through a comparison of ancient and modern information technologies.

Through this combination of theatre and visual art rather than scientific information I’m challenging viewers to examine the deeper causes of climate change. The installation engages them both intellectually and experientially, by first jettisoning them into a fast-paced technologically dominant environment (THE FUTURE), then forcing a slow crawl back into a quiet, cave-like space (THE PAST).

S.O.S.(Save Our Seeds)

The FUTURE – a sensory overload Media Room – reduces the ability to think or respond intelligently due to a profusion of images and overlapping, loud voices, a case of Too Much Information. The PAST – these are the murals – provides physical engagement with the environment through restricted movement and limited light source, while simultaneously offering primitive static images that play on intuition and history. Finally. a resting place in a pleasant low light quiet room, the silence only broken by occasional animal and bird cries (THE PRESENT), provides viewers with an opportunity to offer their own thoughts provoked by the experience in the form of letters to “Mother Earth.”

Oprah and Noah Save the Animals

In the drawings I explore, in a non-alarmist, story-book manner, those aspects of contemporary living that have impacted the environment including consumerism, depletion of natural resources, the ravages of the meat industry, disposable plastics, genetic modification etc. Because the completed project will be experiential (as opposed to an Al Gore-style lecture) I intend it to reach beyond the already-converted to a broader audience including one that has been resistant to the subject. I’m also offering this project as a teaching tool for schools and colleges. I want to encourage people who have not thought much about theses issues to recognize, to take action and to prepare for the global crisis that is already here.

Full project description
Video demo of narrative

All images courtesy of Erica Daborn. From top to bottom: Funeral for the Last Elephant Charcoal on canvas 70 x 154″; Seeking Higher Ground Charcoal on Canvas 70 x 172″; The Murder of Mystery Charcoal on Canvas 70 x 178″; Ahab’s Revenge: Charcoal on canvas 70 x 203″; S.O.S. (Save Our Seeds) Charcoal on canvas 70 x 164″; Oprah and Noah Save the Animals Charcoal on canvas 70 x 159″

Artist’s Voice: Catherine Kehoe

Tuesday, August 30th, 2016

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center (NAC) will present the 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts on September 16-October 15, 2016, at the NAC.

Catherine Kehoe, one of the exhibiting artists, explores the observed world through carefully considered paintings that show us how light and color affects the construction of form.

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Anything can be expressed with a shape and a color made of paint next to another shape and color made of paint.

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A rectangle filled with these things in right relation can add up to any number of illusions or truths.

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Image credit: All images courtesy of Catherine Kehoe.

See Catherine Kehoe’s work at the upcoming exhibition 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts. Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 6-8 PM. New Art Center, 61 Washington Park Newtonville, MA, 02460

Artist’s Voice: Cristi Rinklin

Friday, August 26th, 2016

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center (NAC) will present the 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts on September 16-October 15, 2016, at the NAC.

Cristi Rinklin, one of the exhibiting artists, takes us on a visual exploration of landscape.

The landscape is a consistent motif throughout my work. Rather than being a faithful representation of the natural world we inhabit, it becomes a manifestation of desire and memory imposed upon by the artifice of technology. My recent work situates the landscape as a contemplative space that invites the viewer to explore within. While there is lush beauty here, there is also a conspicuous human absence in these uninhabited, detached fragments that float in ambiguous, abstract spaces. Much in the way that memories exist in fragments with gaping voids of lost information, these landscapes hover in state of dreamy and melancholy suspension, as if these apparitions are all that is left of a world that no longer exists. This sense of uncertainty and detachment is a persistent symptom of our contemporary condition of facing an unknown future.

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Drastic changes such as urban expansion, forest fragmentation, strip-mining and fracking physically disrupt and alter the natural world and threaten its very existence. A concept that was recently introduced to me called “solastalgia” perfectly articulated what I have been intuitively exploring in my recent work. This term, coined by philosopher Glenn Albrecht in 2003, describes a form of existential distress caused by environmental changes such as mining or climate change. This term beautifully describes the psychological response I intend to evoke from my audience. The painting “Displaced” provides a vivid example of this condition.

Displaced

Here we see an aerial view of a fragment of forest surrounded by flood waters. The colors are muted and diffused, as if seen through the atmospheric veil of distance. The flat, icy blue, hard-edge shape that references the water on which the landscape sits, simultaneously becomes a cloud-like shape that overtakes the space in another passage. The emptiness of this stark, flat shape in this otherwise illusionistic space evokes gaps in memory or stored data that threaten to overtake or erase the scene. The combination of tangible realism, abstraction, and ambiguity are intended to disrupt the viewer’s ability to ground or position himself in any particular time or space. It is as if these images are the echoes of fragmented memories that hover in a post-human existence. While the notion of a post-human world may have disturbing implications, I also find poetic beauty in the idea that life and consciousness may exist outside of human experience, and that all this will persist, with or without our participation.

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See Cristi Rinklin’s work at the upcoming exhibition 2016 Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts. Opening Reception: Friday, September 16, 6-8 PM. New Art Center, 61 Washington Park Newtonville, MA, 02460

Image credit: All images courtesy Cristi Rinklin.


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