Archive for the ‘mixed media’ Category

How Do You Approach Art-making During Times of Emotional Distress?

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

Recently, WBUR had a story about how events out of our control – such as the recent election – create stress and internal turmoil that can disrupt all aspects of our lives.

For artists creating (or trying to create) new work, this can mean a serious disruption of their art-making process. We asked artists, How do you approach art-making during times of emotional distress?

Jodie Mim Goodnough, NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL (2015) from the PROSPECT project, Three Inkjet Prints on Cotton Lawn, 36x78 in

Jodie Mim Goodnough, multidisciplinary artist
My work for years has been about emotional distress, both mild and pathological, and the coping mechanisms we use to self-soothe, so you’d think I’d have all the tools I need. Based on the research for my recent work, what I should be doing is going for long walks in the woods and taking deep breaths of forest air. What I’m actually doing, however, is sitting on the couch reading about how much better I would feel if I went for a walk in the woods.

But if I’ve learned one thing, it’s that you can’t beat yourself up for slowing down occasionally – it only compounds the misery. When I don’t have it in me to hit the studio I do small things in the direction of productivity. I research and I plan for future projects. And I look for non-art tasks that feel productive as well, like studying Spanish. I’m currently living in Providence, which has a large Latino population. I feel like I need to find ways to better connect with people in my community right now, and learning another language, even at a basic level, will help me do that.

Jessica Reik, writer
There are always emotions. Some of them are more uncomfortable for me to be with than others. Some, like elation, feel really good but interfere with my ability to write – elation wants the external and so I’m out doing, not home writing! Fear, sadness, insecurity, they pose different challenges. Seeming bottomless (they never are), they threaten to take over the executive self and with it, all those evolved capacities of the human brain – like perspective – I rely on to write.

I like to sit with a difficult emotion and feel where it’s lodged in my body, then find out what’s underneath. Take fear (often in my lower abdomen). Fundamentally, it’s a lack of basic safety, so I look for that safety in tangible ways and identify what is trustworthy and supportive — my bones, my breath, the chair I’m sitting in. Simple stuff. I like to give structure for the emotion, a house I’ve built for it to roam around in, because the emotion itself isn’t the problem, it’s my reaction to it.

Always, in the end, I find myself in the same place at the end of this process — back to the work. My writing comes out of those very same vulnerable places where sadness takes root — where all emotions do — and yet is also one of the sources of stability that gets me through.

Michael Joseph, photographer
In times of emotional stress, not only making art, but also viewing art can provide a much-needed emotional release. Often my most productive periods are when I feel a need to disconnect with my own internal stressors and reconnect with life that is happening around me. Grabbing my camera and going for a walk breaks up a physically sedentary day but also an emotionally clouded one.

Street photography is unique in that it allows the artist to be present with the world in a way that working in a studio cannot. It shifts our role from being a participant to being an observer. Working on the street has a unique duality: the sometimes frustrating challenge of dealing with the unforeseen but also the excitement and reward of capturing the serendipitous. Events out of our control and uncertainty therefore become positives. By paying close attention to unpredictable actions and emotions of others in fluid environments, we are forced to focus less on our own internal thoughts to capture external narratives in real time.

I always saw the camera as a powerful tool of connection. Making street portraits of strangers whose personalities and places in the world are different from my own, forces me to engage with others and learn from them. It presents the challenge of making their unique, internal story come to the surface through a portrait. There is no time for subjects to look in the mirror, change clothes, fix hair or put on make-up, and I can’t ask the sun to change or the clouds to move… I am forced to make art from what is before me. And in that reality, I make my most powerful work.

Michael Joseph, SOPHIE (2013), archival pigment print, 16x16 in

 

Jodie Mim Goodnough is a Providence, Rhode Island-based artist whose work revolves around the use of images in psychology and psychiatry, and includes photography, sculpture, performance, video and sound. Recently, she received a 2017 Rhode Island State Council on the Arts Fellowship in Photography and was named a 2017 Traveling Fellow by the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University. Her work will exhibit in Building a Lineage at Piano Craft Gallery in Boston, January 2017.

Michael Joseph is a street and street portrait photographer. His “Lost and Found” series, which has been featured on CNN, will be included in the December 8 slide presentation night (Dec 8, 6:30 PM) to complement IDENTITY: The List Portraits at The Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Recently honored in PhotoLucida’s Critical Mass 2016 Top 50 list, he’ll have work in the accompanying exhibition (Apr 7-May 2 at the Artwork Network Gallery Space in Denver). He has an article coming out in the December issue of the Czech Republic magazine CILICHILI. Find him on Instagram and Facebook.

Writer Jessica Reik was awarded a fellowship position in Grub Street’s Memoir Incubator Program, where she worked on the memoir The Fathom-Long Body. Recently, she received a fellowship to attend a Ucross Foundation residency and was named a finalist in StoryQuarterly Non Fiction Prize. On Tuesday, January 17, 2017, at 7 PM, she’ll read her work in an event featuring MCC literary awardees.

Images: Jodie Mim Goodnough, NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL (2015) from the PROSPECT project, three Inkjet Prints on cotton lawn, 36×78 in; Michael Joseph, SOPHIE (2013), archival pigment print, 16×16 in.

Fellows Notes – Sep 16

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

Back to school, kiddos! Here’s the latest news from our esteemed alumni – the past awardees of our Artist Fellowships Program.

Ethan Murrow, RIPARIAN LAW (2016), graphite on paper, 36x36in

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center in Newton (NAC) join together to present the MCC Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts (9/16-10/15, opening reception 9/16, 6-8 PM). The exhibition will feature: in Painting – Dennis Congdon, Nicole Duennebier, Raúl Gonzalez, Joel Janowitz, Catherine Kehoe, Andrew Gordon Moore, and Cristi Rinklin; in Drawing & Printmaking – Kim Carlino, Erica Daborn, Linda Etcoff, Kevin Frances, Emily Lombardo, Stephen Mishol, and Ethan Murrow; in Choreography – Dahlia Nayar, Candice Salyers, and Sara L Smith; and in Traditional Arts – Dimitrios Klitsas.

MCC Choreography Fellow Candice Salyers will perform and literary awardees Jane Dykema, Michael Lowenthal, Shubha Sunder, Sheryl White, and Kris Willcox will read at the New Art Center (9/30, 6:30 dance performance, 7 PM reading). Look for more readings by MCC literary Fellows/Finalists in the months ahead.

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Elizabeth Alexander has a solo show, I May Not Be a Lion exhibiting at Elon University in North Carolina (thru 10/6). Watch her artist talk about the show. Also, she is in the group exhibition For the Saturday Evening Girls at Drive-By Projects (9/17-10/29, opening reception 9/17, 4-6 PM).

Marilyn Arsem performs as part of the Arctic Action: International Action Art Festival in Svalbard, Norway (9/19-9/28).

Sarah Bliss co-created a site-specific 16mm film sculpture-installation, pump, filter, reflect, with Chrissy Hunt and Anto Astudillo, and it will be featured in Temporal Currents, a one-night-only live experimental film and sound event at Boston;s Metropolitan Waterworks Museum, featuring filmmakers from the AgX Film Collective and musicians from NonEvent.

John Cameron is in two exhibitions this month: Furniture Masters 2016: Distinctive at 3S ArtSpace in Portsmouth, NH (thru 9/25, Main Event on 9/25). Also, a showcase of work by recent exhibitors at the Smithsonian Craft Show, called D.C. Current, exhibits at the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Rockport, Maine (9/23-1/4, opening reception 9/23, 5-7 PM).

Stephen DiRado has been selected to receive the 35th ArtsWorcester Award (9/9, 6 PM), given annually to an individual who has made exceptional contributions to the artistic and cultural life of this city.

William Giraldi publishes a new memoir this month, The Hero’s Body. He’ll read from the book at Harvard Book Store (9/10, 7 PM).

Kelly Goff‘s installation Dumpster was featured in an article in the arts journal Hyperallergic about the 2016 Governor’s Island Art Fair.

Sean Greene is exhibiting in a two-person show (with Jen Simms) at Mingo Gallery in Beverly (thru 10/8, opening reception 9/9, 6 PM). He’s also in a group show at Mount Holyoke College Blanchard Gallery (thru 9/15, opening reception 9/8, 5:30 PM).

Colleen Kiely has drawings in About Face at UMass Amherst’s Augusta Savage Gallery (9/12-9/28).

Jesse Kreitzer‘s film Black Canaries was awarded the Vermont Symphony Orchestera’s VSO Award for Best Integration of Music into Film at the Middlebury Filmmakers Festival. The film also received Grand Jury Awards for “Best Short Film” and “Best Cinematography” at the 12th Annual HollyShorts Film Festival in Hollywood, California.

Danielle Legros Georges takes part in Living in Many Languages: Poetry And Music to Celebrate the Act of Translation at Dewey Square Parks (9/2, 2 PM). She’ll also read as part of the ICA Boston’s Powerful Words, an evening of readings, reflections, and community in response to violence, racial injustice, and trauma (9/8, 6 PM).

Sandy Litchfield has a solo show, Deciduious City, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (9/7-10/1, opening reception 9/9, 5:30 PM).

Tara Masih is the Series Editor for the annual Best Small Fictions series, which just published the 2016 edition.

Rania Matar exhibits her new photography series Invisible Children, capturing the portraits of young Syrian and Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, at C. Grimaldis Gallery in Baltimore (9/15-10/22, opening reception 9/15, 6-8 PM).

Caitlin McCarthy has essays in two upcoming nonfiction anthologies from McFarland & Company: She Loves You: Women Writers Tell How a Teen Idol Changed Their Life and Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow. Also, her script Wonder Drughighlighted in an article in Collective Evolution.

Richard Michelson is publishing a new children’s book, Fascinating: the Life of Leonard Nimoy. There will be a Publication Party and Book Signing (9/9, 6-8 PM) in conjunction with the opening of UNSEEN: Fifty Never Before Exhibited Photographs, in honor of the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek, at R. Michelson Galleries.

Nathalie Miebach is in a group show, Encircling the World: Contemporary Art, Science, and the Sublime at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design Bakalar Gallery (9/19-12/3, opening reception 9/19, 6-8 PM).

Ethan Murrow has a solo show of drawings, Water Almanac, at Winston Wächter Fine Art in NY (9/8-10/29, opening reception 9/8, 6-8 PM). The artist utilized portions of his MCC grant to support the creation of art for the show, which features drawings based on the Farmers Almanac.

Lisa Olivieri screens her film Blindsided at the Firehouse Center for the Arts in Newburyport (9/18, 12 PM). Q&A with the director to follow screening.

Monica Rayond‘s play A to Z was a finalist for both the Jane Chambers Award and ATHE Award for Excellence in Playwriting. Paper of Plastic, a short opera for which she wrote the libretto (music, Charles Turner), won second prize in Opera Kansas’s short opera competition.

Marian Roth has a solo exhibition, Marian Roth: The Mysterious World of the Camera Obscura, at the Griffin Museum of Photography (9/8-10/2, talk and reception 9/15, 5-8 PM).

Eric Henry Sanders will have a reading of his new play Where’s Annie? at the A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton (9/17, 7:30 PM).

Congratulations to Karen Skolfield, named a runner-up in the The Iowa Review’s Jeff Sharlet Memorial Award for Veterans writing contest. Five of her poems will be published in the Spring 2017 issue of Iowa Review. This month, she’s participating in events surrounding the Amherst Poetry Festival and Emily Dickinson Poetry Marathon 2016 (9/15-9/17).

Peter Snoad‘s short play Bull will be produced by The Landing Theatre in Houston as part of its Redemption series (9/21-10/3). The play is about the love/hate relationship of two New York City cops with Arturo DiModica’s iconic statue of the Charging Bull which they’re guarding during the Occupy Wall Street protests.

Naoe Suzuki, currently artist-in-residence at the Broad Institute, will have a public dialogue with Broad Institute founding core member Tod Golub called Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science (9/27, 3-4 PM).

Scott Wheeler composed the music for Naga, one of the three operas performed as part of the Ouroboros Trilogy at ArtsEmerson (9/10-9/17).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Ethan Murrow (Drawing & Printmaking Fellow ’16), RIPARIAN LAW (2016), graphite on paper, 36x36in.

Fellows Notes – Aug 16

Tuesday, August 2nd, 2016

August, that most distinguished of late summer months, arrives with a new array of news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows & Finalists.

Nicole Duennebier (Painting Fellow '16) and Caitlin Duennebier, CONGREGATION ON THE BRIGHTEST NIGHT (2016), acrylic on laminate panel, 48x60 in

Congratulations to Sonia Almeida and Lucien Castaing-Taylor, both of whom are among the 2017 James and Audrey Foster Prize artists!

Amy Archambault and Leslie Schomp are in the Regional Exhibition of Art and Craft at Fitchburg Art Museum (thru 9/4).

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Steven Barkhimer has launched an IndieGoGo campaign to support a new project, the adaptation and staging of a classical Indian play.

Linda Bond is one of the artists exhibiting in Up in Arms: Taking Stock of Guns at Brattleboro Museum (thru 10/23).

Alice Bouvrie is screening her film A Chance to Dress at The Space in Jamaica Plain (8/20, 8 PM).

Timothy Coleman has work in an exhibition at Castle in the Clouds in New Hampshire (8/21, 5:30 PM), with New Hampshire Furniture Masters.

Rebecca Doughty has a show of new work, entitled More Pictures, at the Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown (8/26-9/14, opening reception 8/26, 6-9 PM).

Nicole Duennebier has a collaborative exhibition with Caitlin Duennebier, Fragment of Sister Head, at Lens Gallery in Boston (opening reception 8/5, 6-8:30 PM).

Samantha Fields is exhibiting in SEVEN: A Performative Drawing Project (Reunion) at Montserrat College of Art (thru 9/10), and is among the artists in Contexture at Jane Lombard Gallery in NYC (thru 8/31).

Basia Goszczynska has a solo exhibition, Rainbow Credits, on view at the Mid-Manhattan Library (thru 8/1).

Michael Hoerman is on the map! Created by poet C.D. Wright in 1994, A Readers’ Map of Arkansas honors writers who contribute to the rich culture of Arkansas literature, whom Arkansas has nurtured.

Zehra Khan is among the artists in AMP: Art Market Provincetown (thru 8/11).

Scott Listfield has a solo show at Lancaster Museum of Art as part of the Made in America series (8/13-10/30).

Rachel Mello is one of the artists exhibiting in TEN Kingston Associates: Our Voices at Kingston Gallery (8/3-8/28, opening reception 8/5, 5:30-8 PM).

Lisa Olivieri‘s film Blindsided got a great review in afterellen.com.

Cecelia Raker‘s play La Llorona was a runner-up for the Princess Grace Award.

Daniel Ranalli will lead a conversation on the work of Liz Deschenes at ICA Boston (8/31, 2 PM). The discussion is free with museum admission.

Monica Rayond‘s play A to Z was a finalist for both the Jane Chambers Award and ATHE Award for Excellence in Playwriting. Paper of Plastic, a short opera for which she wrote the libretto (music, Charles Turner), won second prize in Opera Kansas’s short opera competition.

Jendi Reiter‘s debut novel Two Natures will be published in September by Saddle Road Press of Hilo, HI, and is currently available for pre-order on Amazon. Broadside Bookshop in Northampton, MA is hosting her local book launch (10/19, 7 PM).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Caitlin Duennebier and Nicole Duennebier (Painting Fellow ’16), CONGREGATION ON THE BRIGHTEST NIGHT (2016), acrylic on laminate panel, 48×60 in.

Fellows Notes – Jun 16

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

Summery news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Nathalie Miebach, BLUEBERRIES (2016), Wood, rope, paper, reed, 10x6x9 in

Congratulations to Ilisa Barbash, Jane Gillooly, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, and Lucia Small, all of whom will receive funding from the LEF Foundation as part of their Spring 2016 Moving Image Fund awards.

Carrie Bennett and Frannie Lindsay join Jennifer Barber for a poetry reading at Porter Square Books on 6/8, 7 PM and another at Newtonville Books on 6/16, 7PM.

Five new works created by teams of women artists – which include four past MCC awardees – will be presented as the latest Art on the Marquee by Boston Cyberarts. Ambreen Butt, Mags Harries, Nathalie Miebach, and Deb Todd Wheeler are all creating work for the 80-foot-tall multi-screen LED marquee outside the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center (opening reception 6/1, 6:30-8:30 PM).

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Elizabeth Alexander will have a solo exhibition, Spring Will Be a Little Late This Year at Boston Sculptors Gallery (6/8-7/17, artists reception 6/11, 2-5 PM).

Sandra Allen is among the artists in exhibiting in TreeMuse at the Suffolk University Art Gallery (6/9-7-7, reception 6/9, 5-7 PM).

Claire Beckett‘s solo exhibition Converts at Carroll & Sons Gallery received a great review in the Boston Globe. Her work was also featured on Slate.com.

Congratulations to Sari Boren, who was awarded a 2016 Emerging Artist Grant from the St. Botolph Club Foundation. Recently, her essay Failure to Ignite; A Body at Rest was published in the literary journal Hobart.

Christy Georg is artist-in-residence in the Kohler Arts/Industry Program thru July 2016.

Michael Hoerman recently published three poems in the Spring 2016 issue of Eureka Literary Magazine. This summer, he attends the inaugural Sedona Arts Center residency in Sedona, AZ.

Danielle Legros Georges received the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Emerson College in May.

Holly Lynton has a solo exhibition of her series Bare Handed in the Filter Photo Festival in Chicago, IL (6/3-6/23, opening reception 6/3, 6-9 PM). She recently participated in the FIX Photo Festival in London, exhibiting with Laura Noble Gallery, and she was part of Photo Finish at Station Independent Projects in NYC.

Julie Mallozzi has launched a crowdfunding campaign on IndieGoGo for her film project, The Circle.

Thomas McNeely‘s novel Ghost Horse was recently on the shortlist for the 2016 William Saroyan International Prize for Writing (winner to be announced later this summer) and as a finalist for the 2015 Lascaux Prize in Fiction.

Richard Michelson will read (with David Giannini) as part of the Collected Poets Series at Mocha Maya’s Coffee House in Shelburne Falls (6/2, 7 PM).

Congratulations to Nathalie Miebach, who won a Virginia A. Groot Foundation Grant. She exhibits a new body of work, The Little Ones, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 7/5, opening reception 6/3, 6-8 PM). As noted above, she’s one of the artists featured in Boston Cyberarts’ latest Art on the Marquee.

Sue Murad will premiere her new film, A Visitor’s Guide to Reorientation on Spectacle Island, co-created with Maria Molteni and Hermione Spriggs. The 20-minute film will screen as part of the Fort Point Arts Community Spring Open Studios, at the FPAC Space at Envoy Hotel, (6/17, 7:30, 8:30, and 9 PM).

Anne Neely has a solo show, Ireland: Place and Ritual at the Paul Dietrich Gallery (thru 7/8).

Mary O’Donoghue was featured on Christopher Lydon’s NPR program Radio Open Source on a program called Ireland Rises Again!

Lisa Olivieri‘s film Blindsided was featured in Boston Spirit Magazine.

Cecelia Raker will have readings for her play-in-progress La Llorona, first with Playwrights’ Reading Room at Morrill Memorial Library in Norwood (6/6, 7 PM), and then with Fresh Ink Theatre at Boston Public Library (6/14, 6:30 PM). This past year, she has been a Company One PlayLab Fellow and in July, she’ll have work in the PlayLab Fellowship showcase (7/24).

Monica Raymond has poems and a play monologue in the literary journal Drunken Boat.

Shelley Reed has an exhibition, up close, at Sears Peyton Gallery in New York (thru 6/18).

Congratulations to Anna Ross, whose new poetry chapbook Figuring is now available.

Emily Ross and her recent novel Half in Love with Death were featured in a recent Boston Globe article.

Eric Henry Sanders has a radio play to be read in the Life in the 413 event at New Century Theatre in Northampton (6/4, 7 PM).

Ben Sloat is one of the artists in the three-person show Uncannyland at One Mile Gallery in Kingston, NY (6/4-6/25, opening reception 6/4, 6-9 PM).

Naoe Suzuki had an artist residency at the Studios at MASS MoCA, organized by the Assets for Artists Initiative, in April. In 2016, she is Artist in Residence at Broad Institute, a collaborative community pioneering a new model of biomedical research, based in Cambridge, MA. Check out Naoe’s Tumblr site for her project Flow, an extension of the participatory installation she created at UMass Lowell last year.

Jung Yun‘s novel Shelter got a great review in the Briefly Noted section of The New Yorker. She has an article, My Fargo, in the April edition of The Atlantic.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Nathalie Miebach, BLUEBERRIES (2016), Wood, rope, paper, reed, 10x6x9 in.

What Role Does Research Play in Your Art?

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

Periodically, we pose a question to artists about an issue they face in their work and lives.

Historical, archival, and other research can be crucial to artists, but how and why can vary widely depending on the artist’s work. We asked artists in different disciplines, What role does research play in your process?


View a gallery of some of the research-influenced work of the responding artists

Claire Beckett, photographer
I tend to be interested in subjects that I know very little about, so I need to learn in order to make work. For example, with my current project, The Converts, about Americans converts to Islam, I initially knew very little about the subject. I needed to learn about Islam, about Muslims in America, and about the experience of conversion. I began by reading, where I always begin, because I love to read. I read novels, I re-read The Autobiography of Malcom X, I read a linguistic study, I read ethnography, I read the news. After I while I found that YouTube was full of conversion stories, so I watched those. Beyond the reading, I joined a class for women converting to Islam at a local mosque. When I began attending the class I was straightforward, introducing myself as an artist who wanted to learn about conversion. It must have been odd for the women in the class, but they accepted me. I went on to participate in the class for several years, and I still attend whenever I can. Through the generosity of this group, I learned so much.

Cam Terwilliger, writer
As a historical novelist, research plays an enormous role in my creative process. Right now I’m finishing a novel titled Yet Wilderness Grew in My Heart, which takes place in the colonies of New York and Quebec during the French and Indian War (1754–1763). As the plot develops, the book investigates how colonists conflicted and collaborated with Native people, giving rise to the North America we know today. I’m especially interested in dramatizing the lives of people that existed between cultures, such as Native people that lived in Europe, colonists that studied among Natives, and escaped slaves that took shelter in Indigenous communities.

In terms of process, I research the past first through books of history to get a broad picture of the events, and then I move into primary sources in search of concrete sensory details of the time and place – the details that make the past feel immediate and sensory. I scour through the letters of Jesuit missionaries, the travelogues of naturalists, the narratives of slaves, and newspaper advertisements, hunting for a handful of anecdotes and images that will bring the complex truth of this time into focus. As the novelist Ian McEwan remarks, “It’s worth knowing about ten times as much as you ever use, so you can move freely.”

I then I stitch these details into a single bolt of cloth. My goal is to have all these images and anecdotes fit seamlessly together, even though I’m pulling from very disparate places. The challenge is to imagine a scenario in which they coexist in a dramatically interesting way that does not feel overly contrived or convenient.

Steve Gentile, animator
In the case of my most recently finished animated film, A Pirate Named Ned, the research found me. I was just trying to escape the idea of “reading for a purpose” because I had just finished a film about Emily Dickinson, and that involved extensive research. So I started reading about pirates just for fun. That turned into a short, animated film by accident, and I swear, the research made me do it.

Typically with film & animation, I need to become a semi-expert on the topic at hand, which means a lot of reading. Scholarly researchers who write biographies usually have more constraints with format and also the audience they intend to reach. With film, and especially animation, there’s an opportunity to take more risks, so I try to run to the margins of information. I’ve probably chased down more interesting information from footnotes and appendices than in the actual body of the texts.

Time-based media is not really the most efficient way to convey a mountain of facts and information. Writing is better suited for that. It’s hard to convey every detail of every story without putting the viewer to sleep, so a lot of the stories that I think are really neat sometimes don’t make it into a film. This is o.k. – those ideas can work their way into how a character is drawn, or how they move – how they’re animated. That’s an advantage animation has over writing.

Emily Lombardo, visual artist
When I decide to take on a project that is in direct relationship to another work of art or historical moment, I dive into research like a newly awakened conspiracy theorist. I feverishly comb the Internet for articles, links, books, interviews and documentaries. With The Caprichos, I had 80 plates to decode which Goya had made purposefully ambiguous to fly under the radar of the Spanish Monarchy. However in order for me to be able to recode and create a new independent body of work, it is important for me to step outside of the research to be able to make room for fantasy and a new narrative. The research serves as a solid point of departure where parallels and differences are revealed in my relationship with the reference. For me the research is the love affair, and the work comes after the break up. One can see the final effects of my research in the crafting of the works. This means that if I choose to appropriate a work of art that is etching I will take painstaking measures to accomplish the work in the traditional method of the artist I am referencing. By paying homage to the craftsmanship of the previous work, the audience is free to discuss why the work was made rather than how.

Azadeh Tajpour, visual artist
Research has been an essential and often the most time consuming part of my art making process. My installations of paintings, drawings, prints, and video have all been based on images or footages found within an area of curiosity, followed by further research of the subject, imagery, and the ways of representation.

Currently, I am studying a huge photo album from the 19th c., which I have been amazed not only by the photographs and their variety of genres, but also by their arrangements, and the ethnographic style of documentation. I read the textual narrative and look at their relationship with the photographs. Even though I have some vague ideas, mostly visual, the final outcome is uncertain, which can be frightening so keeping faith in the process is crucial. The next step would be to go back and look at my notes and selected images, with either a clearer sense of the direction, or just a narrower focus; this step might be repeated again and again. Research, brainstorming, drawing charts, and possible conversations will help me to progress. After all, maybe we are all doing what Michelangelo had mentioned, discovering the statue inside of the stone block by carving and carving.

 

Related reading: What do we owe to history in our art?

Claire Beckett is a photographer whose solo exhibition The Converts is on view at Carroll & Sons Gallery through May 28 (opening reception May 6, 2016, 5:30-7:30 pm. She also has work in the The Outwin: American Portraiture Today exhibition at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, through 2016.

Steve Gentile is an animator, documentary filmmaker, and Professor of Animation at Massachusetts College of Art & Design. His current project, “Chateau au Go Go,” is an animated film that uses the images from wine corks to make a kinetic statement about the human history of control over nature. The research involved the opening of a lot of wine bottles.

Emily Lombardo is a visual artist who applies her vast knowledge of sculpture and print across a wide range of conceptual projects.

Azadeh Tajpour is a visual artist working in various media. She recently exhibited art based on found footage and archival photos at the Hollister Gallery of Babson College, and earlier this year, she was in a group show at the Walter Feldman Gallery and had a residency at PLAYA in Summerlake, Oregon.

Cam Terwilliger is the 2015/2016 winner of the Historical Novel Society’s New Novel Award and is currently the Tickner Writing Fellow at Gilman School in Baltimore. From May 2 to May 6, he is teaching a one-week intensive online course on Flash Fiction through the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown.

How Do You Approach the Business of Art?

Friday, April 1st, 2016

Periodically, we pose a question to artists about an issue they face in their work and lives.

It can be challenging to balance artistic creation with the business, financial, or other career aspects of artists’ work. Artists are encouraged to see their art career as a “business” – but how does that translate into practice? We asked artists in different disciplines, What is your approach to the business of art, and how has it changed over time?

Part two of a two-part discussion.

Jake Fried, animator
Ultimately, my experimental animations must transcend financial concerns, otherwise they become something else for someone else. Luckily, making deeply personal work that I believe in has increasingly led to new and rewarding paid opportunities.

My main source of income is teaching, mostly at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. This past year I have created commissioned work for Adult Swim and the Marionette Record label, among others. I have screened my films at many international festivals, gallery shows and artist talks that provide awards and fees. And finally I’ve been awarded grants and fellowships, including one recently in Film & Video from the MCC.

As much as possible I want my artistic and financial success to stem directly from being true to my vision – it’s a hustle and I’m always chasing new opportunities to make this happen, but it’s worth it to make the work I believe in.

Jenine Shereos, LEAF (2013), human hair, 5x3 in, photo by Robert Diamante

Jenine Shereos, sculptor/installation artist
A few years ago, some of my work was featured on a popular art and design blog. I received a lot of exposure from this, and it had a ripple effect over the years as people continued to share the images on social media and other online venues. Many positive opportunities arose from this publicity, but it was definitely a learning experience as well. I had people contact me with bizarre commission requests, dealt with copyright issues, and even had an offer from Ripley’s Believe it or Not! This experience taught me the importance of being my own agent. To say no to things that don’t fit with my vision and to seek out the opportunities that I feel will enhance my career as an artist. I spend a lot of time researching residencies, grants, and other opportunities online. Recently, artist residencies have played a significant role in my artistic journey and have afforded me time away to focus on my art.

Similar to my artistic practice, I see the business aspect of my work as an organic process that continues to grow and evolve over time. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to support myself fully from my art, but the obstacles keep me thinking creatively. Sometimes I feel frustrated by a sense of disconnection in my life, although I know I am not alone and many artists face the same struggle. On the one hand, my work has been shown internationally in museums and included in major publications. At the same time, I am nearing forty and waiting tables while piecing together odd jobs. Recently, I was sharing my frustrations with a friend and he asked if there was anyone I know personally who is making their living exclusively as an artist who I could look to as a model. After thinking through the many artists I have met over the years, I couldn’t think of a single one. I am slowly realizing that maybe this isn’t necessarily the end goal. I try to focus on the fact that I love making art and know I will always find a way to continue to do so against any odds.

Publicity photo from THE LAUNCH PRIZE, written by MJ Halberstadt, produced March 2016 at the Calderwood Pavilion of the Boston Center for the Arts, directed by Tiffany Nichole Greene, featuring Katharine Chen Lerner, Bari Robinson, John Tracey, and Angela K Thomas

MJ Halberstadt, playwright
People joke that Masters Programs in playwriting are “red headed stepchildren” that can’t be boxed neatly into more easily articulable Theatre or Creative Writing programs. Similarly, reconciling playwriting within the framework of a business model presents questions and problems. On one hand, I’m an artist-for-hire because different companies present my work. When they do, I am not the play’s “producer.” On the other hand, I am a free-lancer because I am the sole proprietor of my own playwriting “business.” The minimum viable product of what I can produce is a script, not a play, which is not sellable by itself – except, arguably, in the case of having the script published. It becomes necessary to tease apart distinctions, especially between my script and a company’s production of it. Combined, they make the product (a “play”) but assigning value to my part in it is tricky, especially when all of the theatre world is starving for monetary resources and many of the producers of my work are personal friends. I’m not a playwright for gain; in fact, only about a dozen American playwrights sustain themselves entirely off royalties. That’s why I have a totally unrelated day job at present; this is getting more and more difficult to reconcile since my playwriting “career” demands more of me each year.

[MJ takes a sip from a glass of whiskey.]

If my “brand” has “worth,” it’s not quantifiable. If anything, I’m building up artistic capital through making myself known and archiving reviews and, yes, “networking.” The hope is that it’ll pay off if and when I sell a TV pilot or get a job teaching playwriting.

[MJ takes another – longer – sip.]

 

Related reading: Who Is Your Audience? and How Do You Define Success as an Artist?

Jake Fried (inkwood.net) is an experimental animator whose work has shown on Carton Network’s Adult Swim, at the Tate Modern, in the Sundance Film Festival, and many other festivals and venues. He recently screened work in the Boston Underground Film Festival and has upcoming screenings at the Ashland Independent Film Festival, the Annecy International Animation Film Festival, and the Melbourne International Animation Festival.

MJ Halberstadt’s (mj-halberstadt.squarespace.com) new play is That Time the House Burned Down, produced by Fresh Ink Theatre at Boston Playwrights Theatre April 8-23. His play The Launch Prize was produced by Bridge Rep in Boston in March ’16 (read a great review in the Boston Globe). In February, he was profiled by Emerson College, and he wrote about race and privilege in theatre for HowlRound. In 2014, he was one of the artists selected to participate in Assets for Artists, a program supporting artists through financial and business training opportunities and matched savings.

Jenine Shereos (jenineshereos.com) is a sculptor and installation artist specializing in fiber and textile processes. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including in France, Italy, Switzerland, Poland, Portugal, Hungary, Austria, and Canada, and has been published in the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, The Huffington Post, Make Magazine, and and the compendium Textiles: The Art of Mankind. Her work is currently on view at Centraal Museum in Utrecht, Netherlands, and in 2017, she will have a solo show at the Hampden Gallery at UMass Amherst.

Images and Media: BRAIN LAPSE by Jake Fried; Jenine Shereos, LEAF (2013), human hair, 5×3 in, photo by Robert Diamante; publicity photo from THE LAUNCH PRIZE, written by MJ Halberstadt, produced March 2016 at the Calderwood Pavilion of the Boston Center for the Arts, directed by Tiffany Nichole Greene, featuring Katharine Chen Lerner, Bari Robinson, John Tracey, and Angela K Thomas.

How Do You Approach the Business of Art?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Periodically, we pose a question to artists about an issue they face in their work and lives.

It can be challenging to balance artistic creation with the financial, marketing, or other career aspects of artists’ work. Artists are encouraged to see their art career as a “business” – but how does that translate into practice? We asked artists in different disciplines, What is your approach to the business of art, and how has it changed over time?

Part one of a two-part discussion.

Wall mural by Caleb Neelon in Somerville, MA (basketball court is by Maria Molteni)

Caleb Neelon, international public artist
Last year while on a mural project in Sarajevo I passed a funny milestone: first time out at some bar (legally) downing beers with people half my age. I was 38 then and the guys were 19. They were eager young graffiti writers and they were taking the chance to grill me with nerdy graffiti history questions and ask about their favorite international graffiti writers that I had met or painted with over the years. They wanted to do their own individual version of what I had done, which was to make a career out of the doors-of-possibility-blowing-open passion of my youth. And one thing that I realized, and said to them, was that while I had been in some way a professional artist since I was their age, and those 20 years feel like forever, I’m consumed with how I positively navigate the next 40, or however long fate has in store for me. In many ways, the goals for me have shifted from a list of specifics (show here, sell for this much, publish this, paint a mural there, etc) to the end goal of doing good work up to the time I’m done here on Earth.

Crystal King, novelist, writer, and marketing/communications professional
Over the last few years, I’ve taught many classes to artists and authors on how to use social media. Many of them are there to learn only because someone, usually an agent, has told them that they need to be on Facebook or Twitter. Often, they are not happy about it. Some people do their best to engage with and build their audience. Others start social accounts but let them languish a month or so after their show or their book comes out, then bemoan the fact that no one is interested in their work.

To me, the business of art is just as important as the art itself. This is a world in which anyone has the chance to be successful. But unless you’ve managed to get lucky, you have to pay or play for your art to be noticed. If you can’t pay for publicity, then you need to learn and work for it. I’m always baffled when people are unwilling to promote themselves. If you believe in the work that you do, why on earth wouldn’t you do EVERYTHING you can to help others see your vision? This is more important than ever for me, as I prepare for my own book to come out in 2017.

Mariko Kusumoto, metalworker and textile artist
My artistic choices have changed over time, and the business side has followed the creative. Metal constructions had been my main focus since 1995, but in 2013 – after completing a very involved and technically challenging metal piece – I felt the need to move away from using purely representational imagery and do something more abstract, organic, and in a different material; the result has been fabric work. Fabric is completely opposite metal, and I like the softness, gentle texture, and atmospheric quality of the fabric I use.

In a formal manner, the financial aspects of my work are completely managed by my gallery although we work in unison to establish pricing. My metal pieces are quite expensive. But in developing smaller-scale fabric pieces, I felt that a wider audience/collector would find them more accessible, both aesthetically and financially. The public exposure for this new work (e.g., print, websites) has expanded audience interest as well.

What else has changed over the course of my career are opportunities and invitations that require an increasing amount of time to attend to thus removing me from the necessary concentration needed to make my work. I am flattered and grateful for the interest, but I have to politely refuse certain requests.

Metalwork by Mariko Kusumoto: RYOUNKAKU (2007), board game, metalworks, 27x9x1-1/2 in, photo by Dean Powell
Top: metalwork by Mariko Kusumoto from 2007; bottom: Mariko’s recent textile work
Recent textile work by Mariko Kusumoto, photo courtesy of the artist and Mobilia Gallery

 

Related reading: Getting More Out of Getting Online by Jessica Burko, and What Decision Most Impacted Your Career?

Crystal King (crystalking.com) is a 20-year marketing and communications veteran who has directed global social media programs for companies such as Pegasystems (were she currently works), Keurig, CA Technologies, and Sybase. Crystal is also a writer and Pushcart-nominated poet. Her first novel, Feast of Sorrow, will be published by Touchstone Books in 2017. She has taught classes in writing, creativity, and social media at Harvard Extension School, Boston University, Mass College of Art, and UMass Boston. At Grub Street Writers’ The Muse and the Marketplace Conference (April 29-May 1), she will present workshops on electronic tools to streamline writing and self-promotion using social media.

Mariko Kusumoto (marikokusumoto.com) is a metalworker and printmaker who is now working in fiber. Her intricate metal box sculptures have exhibited at Fuller Craft Museum, Morikami Museum, Racine Art Museum, and Society for Contemporary Craft, and her fiber creations have been featured in American Craft and Fiber Art Now magazines. She is represented by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, which has a Spotlight Exhibition of her work thru April 16, 2016.

Caleb Neelon‘s (calebneelon.com) wall murals and other works have exhibited in dozens of countries and in many galleries, museums, hospitals, and educational settings. Along with his artist monograph Caleb Neelon’s Book of Awesome, he is the co-author of The History of American Graffiti, Street World, and Graffiti Brasil, among other publications. His most recent projects, the documentary film Wall Writers: Graffiti in Its Innocence and an accompanying art book from Ginko Press, are forthcoming.

Images: wall mural by Caleb Neelon in Somerville, MA (basketball court is by Maria Molteni); Mariko Kusumoto, RYOUNKAKU (2007), board game, metalworks, 27x9x1-1/2 in, photo by Dean Powell; recent textile work by Mariko Kusumoto, photo courtesy of the artist and Mobilia Gallery.

Fellows Notes – Mar 16

Tuesday, March 1st, 2016

Traveling portraits, poems of the moment, new art shared locally and abroad: here’s the March news from current and past MCC Fellows/Finalists.

Domingo Barreres, AMBITION (2001), oil, polymer, 81x61.5 in

Mass Poetry’s Poem of the Moment has recently featured poems by Carrie Bennett (Expedition Notes 34), Sarah Sousa (Epistle), and Rodney Wittwer (& the Sun Is a Fine Buggy of China: Balloons!).

Portraits by Laura Chasman and Andrea Sherrill Evans are included in Go Figure at Salve Regina University’s Dorrance H. Hamilton Gallery (thru 3/16). (More news about Laura Chasman below.)

Caleb Neelon and Candice Smith Corby are exhibiting Sting! 22: ES LOG ART at The Beehive, featuring work curated by and relating to work by Doug Weathersby of Environmental Services. The exhibition opened 3/2.

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Marilyn Arsem will be in discussion with Sandrine Schaefer about her recent 100 Ways to Consider Time performance at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston. The discussion is part of the Reports from Afield series by mobius and takes place at Samsøñ 3/18, 5-8 PM, free to the public with q&a following the talk.

Rick Ashley has a photograph from his Michael project in the Smithsonian’s traveling exhibition The Outwin: American Portraiture Today. The exhibition runs 3/12/2016-1/8/2016 at the National Portrait Gallery, and then travels to the Tacoma Art Museum, the Art Museum of South Texas, and the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art in Kansas City.

Domingo Barreres has a solo show, Domingo Barreres: Paintings, Drawings and Prints with Lingering Vibrations from Spain at The Fort Point Arts Community’s Gallery at 249 A (thru 3/28, artists talk 3/10, 6 PM).

Congratulations to Laura Chasman who received a grant from the Artist Resource Trust, Berkshire Taconic Foundation for 2016. She also received a fellowship to attend Vermont Center Studio Residency in September. Recently, two of her portraits were included in the recent exhibition Director’s Favorites at the New Britain Museum of American Art.

Tsar Fedorksy has a solo exhibit of photography, The Light Under the Door, at Garner Center at New England School of Photography (NESOP), (thru 3/18). Read about the exhibition on the Elin Spring Photography blog. She will also exhibit in Exposure 2016 from the Photographic Resource Center (4/28-6/26). She had 2015 exhibitions at Danforth Art, the Camera Club of New York, and Candela Books + Gallery (Richmond, VA) and she was featured online at Feature Shoot and Don’t Take Pictures’ Photo of the Day.

Congratulations to Georgie Friedman, one of 3 artists whose projects will be realized in the Boston Artist-in-Residence Program. She also has work in 32° – The Art of Winter at the Shelburne Museum in Vermont (thru 5/30) and her installation Slippery Slope is on view at Union College in Schenectady. She was recently featured in Good and Long Looks at the Providence College Reilly Gallery.

John Gianvito‘s film WAKE (SUBIC) screened at the Viennale Film Festival and made it to Top Ten Lists of 2015 in Artforum, Sight & Sound, and Senses of Cinema. It recently screened at the Rotterdam International Film Festival and had its North American premiere on 2/27 at the Museum of Modern Art in conjunction with their annual Doc Fortnight series. The first Boston screening will be Sunday 3/13, 3 PM at the Harvard Film Archive.

Mags Harries has a solo show, Precautionary Tales at Gallery Kayafas in Boston (3/4-4/9, opening 3/4 5:30-8 PM).

Nona Hershey has work in Art On Paper New York at Pier 36 (3/3-3/6).

Michael Hoerman was handpicked by the Sedona Arts Center for its inaugural summer residency program. They are bringing together “artists, cultural managers, and interesting people from all over the world” at Verde Valley School, a private school on 1,300 acres in Sedona, AZ.

Kieran Jordan Dance presents Little Gifts at Green Street Studios in Cambridge (3/11-3/12, 8 PM).

Rebecca Kaiser Gibson has readings at the Brookline Public Library (with Holly Guran, Brookline Poetry Series 3/20, 2-4 PM), Brewbakers Café in Keene, NH (3/27, 4 PM), and Boston Athenaeum (4/26, 12 PM).

Mariko Kusumoto‘s translucent textile jewelry exhibits at Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge (3/15-4/16).

Danielle Legros Georges is the guest speaker for the Writer’s Union Annual Book Party at the Durrell Family Theater in the Central Square YMCA (3/20 2-5 PM).

Fred H.C. Liang‘s solo show Stream is at Carroll and Sons Gallery (thru 4/16, opening reception 3/4, 5:30-7:30 PM).

Caitlin McCarthy‘s unproduced TV pilot Free Skate has been named “One To Watch” by the 2016 WriteHer List. She was recently interviewed by Forty Over 40, and she spoke about TV writing at the Woods Hole Film Festival and the Orange Beach Public Library, in February.

Richard Michelson reads in the Calliope Poetry Series in Falmouth (3/13) and at the Martha’s Vineyard Playhouse Poetry Café (3/15).

Lisa Olivieri‘s film Blindsided will be having its Boston Premiere as part of the The National Association of Social Workers (MA Chapter) Film Series at Belmont’s Studio Cinema (4/3, 2 PM).

Monica Raymond reads from “A Walk on Norfolk Street,” a poetry sequence about the Tsarnaev brothers and the Boston bombings, at goodTHANG, a multi-media extravaganza at Arts at the Armory (Somerville) on Good Friday (3/25).

Susan Rivo‘s documentary Left on Pearl screens at Kendall Square Theatre for International Women’s Day (3/8, 7 and 9 PM). Followed by Q & A with the filmmakers and members of the Executive Producers’ Collective.

TRIIIBE, aka the identical triplets Alicia, Kelly, and Sara Casilio along with photographer Cary Woliknsky, have a solo show at Fitchburg Art Museum, TRIIIBE: same difference (thru 6/5), and the show was recently reviewed in WBUR’s ARTery. A companion exhibition of work by TRIIIBE is at Gallery Kayafas (thru 4/9).

Sarah Wentworth has more than a dozen photos from her Untitled (fishline) series in the 3-person show Caprices at the Simmons College Trustman Gallery (3/16-4/14). The fishline series features performed photos centered on a costume made of knit fishing line, taken on Deer Isle, Maine.

Jung Yun has readings for her new novel Shelter at Odyssey Bookshop (3/15, 7 PM) and at Newtonville Books (with James Scott, 3/22, 7 PM).

Michael Zelehoski has work in Objects and Everyday Goods at Mike Weiss Gallery in NYC (thru 3/26).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Domingo Barreres, AMBITION (2001), oil, polymer, 81×61.5 in.

Fellows Notes – Feb 16

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

It’s a Leap Year, so there’s an extra day this month to enjoy the awesomeness of Massachusetts artists!

For a taste, we offer news from past Fellows and Finalists of MCC’s Artist Fellowships.


Melinda Lopez, who has a new play opening this month (see below), in the 40 Years of Fellowships project

 

Two exhibitions at the University of New Hampshire Museum of Art feature past MCC awardees: Sophia Ainslie and Cristi Rinklin join Nathan Miner in the three-person exhibition, Groundswell, while Shelley Reed and Randall Thurston exhibit in Natural Wonder. Both shows run thru 4/3.

Elizabeth Alexander and Randall Thurston are both exhibiting in Paper and Blade: Modern Paper Cutting at the Fuller Craft Museum (thru 7/24).

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Deborah Abel of the Deborah Abel Dance Company recently returned home from a 3 city tour of India where she gave Bhakti Modern Dance master classes. See pictures from a master class at Kalakshetra Conservatory of Music and Dance in Chennai India in January.

Kati Agócs was recently featured on WBUR’s The ARTery for a recent concert of her work. Kati’s new CD The Debrecen Passion was featured by WQXR as its album of the week.

Allison Cekala‘s solo show Salt Mountain at the Howard Art Project was listed as Cate McQaid’s highlights from 2015, and her photo show Salt is on view at the Mayor’s Gallery at City Hall (thru 2/29). Allison’s project Fundir (which she submitted to win her 2015 fellowship) is a video piece tracking salt gathered from northern Chile and transported to Boston for winter road maintenance. She spoke on a segment in PRI’s The World about the road salt harvesting and transport process.

Alexander Chee‘s new novel Queen of the Night is published this month. He was interviewed on Late Night with Seth Meyers!

Georgie Friedman‘s video installation Slippery Slope is on view at the Wold Atrium of Union College in Schenectady, NY (thru 11/2016).

Matthew Gamber‘s Grammar, a survey of recent photography works, is on view at College of the Holy Cross Cantor Art Gallery (thru 2/27).

John Gianvito curated the four-person exhibition High Low at the Fort Point Arts Community Gallery (2/23-3/29, opening reception 3/3 5:30-7:30 PM).

Rebecca Kaiser Gibson was interviewed by Mass Poetry about her new book Opinel. She has upcoming readings at The Blacksmith House (2/22, with Michael Morse) and Boston Athenaeum (4/27).

Sean Greene is in the 20th Anniversary Exhibition at William Baczek Fine Arts (thru 3/12), and he’s among the artists who worked with a chair to create a new work, in Take a Seat at the UMass Amherst Museum of Contemporary Art (thru 2/27, silent auction 2/28).

Marky Kaufmann has a solo show, Landscapes and Prayers at Griffin Museum’s Digital Silver Imaging Gallery (thru 3/11, opening reception 2/18, 6-8 PM). Also, Marky curated and is exhibiting in Outspoken, a show of six female photographers (including Rania Matar), at Middlesex School in Concord.

Caroline Klocksiem has poetry in the latest issue of Opon.

Daniel Kornrumpf is exhibiting in Extrapolation at the Trustman Art Gallery at Simmons College (2/4-3/4, reception 2/4, 5-7 PM).

Joy Ladin recently received a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowships, and she was featured in an interview on the NEA’s Art Works Blog.

Siobhan Landry was featured on Neighbor Media for a new film project exploring the abolitionist history of this region, specifically Georgetown, MA.

Sandy Litchfield‘s solo show Filterscape is on view at Carroll and Sons Gallery (thru 2/27).

Melinda Lopez (featured in the 40 Years of Fellowships video, above) has a new play, Back the Night at Boston Playwrights Theatre (2/4-2/28).

Rania Matar has gotten advance reviews for her new photography book L’Enfant-Femme from The Guardian, ARTslant, LensCulture, and The Daily Telegraph.

Cynthia Maurice is in the two-person show Out the Window & Around the Town at Brickbottom Art Gallery in Somerville (thru 2/27).

Rachel Mello co-curated and is exhibiting in the Sketchbook Show 2016 at the Nave Gallery (thru 3/3).

Vanessa Michalak recently accepted a position for the Spring semester as the “Emerging Artist in Residence” at Penn State, Altoona. She has an upcoming Exhibition in the McLanahan Gallery on campus (3/17-4/3).

Nathalie Miebach has pieces in two shows that are part of the State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now exhibition: Minneapolis Institute of Art (2/18-5/29) and Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA (2/19-9/4).

Anne Neely‘s Water Stories: Conversations in Paint and Sound, created with Halsey Burgund, is traveling from its original setting at the Museum of Science Boston to Old Dominion University Baron and Ellin Gordon Gallery in Norfolk, VA (thru 3/13).

Cecelia Raker is a 2016 PlayLab Fellow at Company One Theatre in Boston.

Kathryn Ramey has a new book, Experimental Filmmaking – BREAK THE MACHINE. There will be a book launch event on 2/4, 6-8 PM, at City Feed and Supply in Jamaica Plain, including a hand-drawn film workshop by AgX Film Collective.

Monica Raymond‘s play A to Z is a finalist for the Association for Theatre in Higher Education Award of Excellence in Playwriting.

Cristi Rinklin is among the artists exhibiting in Collaboration: The Artist and the Land at the Sharon Arts Center at the New Hampshire Institute of Art (thru 2/20).

Anna Ross wrote a moving tribute to C.D. Wright for the Mass Poetry blog.

Samuel Rowlett has a solo exhibition entitled Landscape Painting in the Expanded Field as part of the O P E N exhibition series at the Julian Scott Memorial Gallery at Johnson State College. At a gallery talk related to the exhibition, Samuel conducted an interactive digital painting session, with students and visitors using smartphones as both palette and canvas!

Mary Sherman‘s Eri, After Dark was performed at Drive-By Projects in January.

Sarah Slifer Swift is embarking on the second year of her Trident Live Art Series at Trident Gallery in Gloucester MA. The series is a platform for local and regional performance-based artists to show current projects in a salon setting. The upcoming show on 2/6, 7 PM features a new duet by Swift and cellist Kristen Miller.

Sarah Sousa (one of the brand new Poetry Fellows!) is featured in Mass Poetry’s Poem of the Moment, with her poem Epistle.

Laurel Sparks has a solo show, Magic Squares, at Sarah Lawrence College Barbara Walters Gallery (thru 3/13). There will be an artist lecture on 2/16, 4 PM.

TRIIIBE, aka the identical triplets Alicia, Kelly, and Sara Casilio along with photographer Cary Woliknsky, have a solo show at Fitchburg Art Museum, TRIIIBE: same difference (2/7-6/5, opening reception 2/7, 1-3 PM).

Evan Ziporyn was named one of the 40 Most Intriguing Musicians of 2016 by The Daily Beast.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Media: Melinda Lopez, interviewed at the Huntington Theatre Company, for the 40 Years of Fellowships project.

Fellows Notes – Nov 15

Friday, October 30th, 2015

This month, while the sunshine ebbs, the news from past awardees of MCC’s Artist Fellowships shines ever shinier.

Naoe Suzuki, LOVE, SUNSHINE, mixed media on laser cut paper

Liza Bingham and Zehra Khan are among the artists in Lost Cat: Art in the Age of Social Media, at Cape Code Museum of Art (11/24-1/17, events 12/5).

In October, the Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MassArt) announced that 11 artists were selected for the City of Boston’s first artist-in-residence program, Boston AIR, including Peter DiMuro (MCC Choreography Fellow ’90), Georgie Friedman, Caleb Neelon, and Liz Nofziger.

Rebecca Doughty and Zehra Khan join Phillip Knoll for Animal/Animist at Room 83 Spring Gallery, in Watertown, MA, (11/5-12/20, reception 11/7, 5-7 PM).

Congratulations to the ten artists named as 2015 Brother Thomas Fellows, including past MCC awardees Raúl Gonzalez III, Masako Kamiya, Balla Kouyaté, and Danielle Legros Georges. The Fellows receive unrestricted grants of $15,000 through a fund established at the Boston Foundation in 2007 to honor the legacy of Brother Thomas Bezanson, a Benedictine monk and world-renowned ceramic artist.

Warren Mather and Janice Redman join Janice Jakielski in the show Not Really Practical at the Trustman Gallery at Simmons College (11/9-12/14, reception 11/12, 5-7 PM).

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Elizabeth Alexander has a solo show at Flanders Gallery in Raliegh, NC, A Changeable and Unpredictable Nature: Elizabeth Alexander, 11/6-12/8.

Stacey Alickman has a solo show, Humpty Dumpty II, at Kingston Gallery (thru 11/29, opening reception 11/6, 5:30-7:30 PM).

Alexandra Anthony recently had the U.K. Premiere of her film Lost in the Bewilderness which won the Odysseus Award for Best Creative Documentary at the London Greek Film Festival. The film garnered a positive Boston Globe review when it screened in the Arlington International Film Festival in October, and it will screen at the Wellesley College Davis Museum (Collins Cinema) 11/5, 6 PM, q&a with filmmaker to follow.

Domingo Barreres has a solo show at the Brookline Arts Center, Domingo Barreres: Myth, Reality And The Illusive Glimmer Of Recognition (thru 11/20).

Congratulations to Alice Bouvrie, whose documentary film A Chance to Dress won Best Documentary Short at the Arlington International Film Festival in October.

Laura Chasman has two portraits in the exhibition Director’s Favorites: 1999- 2015 at the New Britain Museum of American Art in CT (thru 1/3).

Candice Smith Corby has a solo show, Forever and Forever and Forever, Is a Long Time at Miller Yezerski Gallery (11/20-12/22, reception 12/4, 5-8 PM).

Patrick Donnelly has his inaugural reading as Poet Laureate of Northampton on 11/1, 4 PM, at the Smith College Neilson Library. He was Mass Poetry’s Poet in the Spotlight for October.

Vico Fabbris will teach Watercolor and Inventive Thinking at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston for a five-week course (11/2-11/30).

Patrick Gabridge has the world premiere of his play Lab Rats at Boston’s Atlantic Wharf (11/6-11/15), in Salisbury, MD (11/19), and in Ocean City, MD (11/20-11/23).

John Gianvito‘s film WAKE (Subic) premiered at the Viennale in Oct/Nov.

Raúl Gonzalez III, along with winning at Brother Thomas Fellowship (see above), will have a solo show, Regalo, at the Boston University Annex Gallery (thru 12/13).

Eric Gottesman will celebrate the US launch of his new photography book Sudden Flowers at Foto DC, 11/8, 5 PM.

Deborah Henson-Conant, whose musical compositions are woven into several of the MCC’s 40 Years of Fellowships videos, wrote a great blog post about the impact of her two Massachusetts Artist Fellowships, in the ’80s.

Congratulations to Elizabeth James-Perry, who won an inaugural Rebecca Blunk Fund award from the New England Foundation for the Arts. The awards are grants of $2,500 each in unrestricted support to support the creation of new work and for professional development. The fund is in honor of the legacy of former NEFA executive director Rebecca Blunk, who passed away in 2014.

Ben Jolivet‘s play Cain and Abel had its world premiere at the Wilbury Theatre Group in Providence, RI.

Rebecca Kaiser Gibson joins Gary Whited for a reading at the Suffolk University Poetry Center (11/4, 7 PM).

Cristina Kotz Cornejo launches the inaugural Women in Motion Summit at Emerson College this month (11/9), a gathering of women in film/media to discuss experiences and effect change.

Kate Leary‘s story Holy Family will be published in the November 11 issue of Amazon Day One, a weekly literary journal for the Kindle. Day One features just one story and one poem by emerging writers per issue, plus author interviews. A week after the publication, the story will be available as a Kindle Single.

Rania Matar‘s photography book L’Enfant Femme is published this month. The book features an Introduction by Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, an essay by Lois Lowry, author of The Giver, and an afterword by Kristen Gresh, Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh Assistant Curator of Photographs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. This month, her work is exhibiting in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2015 exhibit at the National Portrait Gallery, London (11/12-2/21).

Anne Neely has an exhibition of 30 watercolors inspired by living on the coast of Maine, traveling to Ireland for an Artist Residency in County Kerry, and a trip to Japan, called Transforming Place. It’s at The Robert Lehman Art Center at Brooks School in North Andover (thru 12/18).

Lisa Olivieri‘s documentary Blindsided is an official selection for the Broken Knuckle Film Festival.

Dave Ortega‘s 24-page comic Dias de Consuelo Issue I is now available! The publication is the first in a series about the artist’s 100-year old abuela, Consuelo Herrera, beginning in the tumultuous years of the Mexican Revolution. The artist will be participating in Comics Arts Brooklyn (11/7) where he will have copies of the Dias de Consuelo, as well as limited copies of Poor Mexico, a new zine published by Bien Vestido Press.

Naoe Suzuki has a solo exhibition, In Solidarity, at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Art Gallery (thru 11/25). A catalogue of Naoe’s work, Be Water, My Friend will be published this month. Earlier in the year, Naoe won a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, which enabled her to work on her project Water, is Taught by Thirst in Berlin and at Blue Mountain Center in the Adirondacks.

Joyce Van Dyke‘s play Daybreak (previously produced as departed/A Dream Play, is being produced at the Tufts University Balch Arena Theater (10/29-11/7), directed by Barbara Wallace Grossman (MCC board member!).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Naoe Suzuki, LOVE, SUNSHINE, mixed media on laser cut paper.


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