Archive for the ‘literature’ Category

Fellows Notes – Jan 17

Monday, January 9th, 2017

Each month, we share the news and honors of Artist Fellows & Finalists. Here’s the newest, in this new month of the new year.

Cover art for BEFORE YOU by Rebecca Doughty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017)

Regie Gibson, Letta Neely, Monica Raymond, and David Valdes Greenwood are among the artists whose work will be performed at Pinning Our Hopes, an evening of poems and scenes exploring the years ahead under the new president. The show, which is curated by David Valdes Greenwood, has two performances (1/14, 4 PM and 8 PM) and is free/donation-based.

Marky Kauffmann and Rania Matar both have photography in Outspoken: Seven Women Photographers at the de Menil Gallery at Groton School (opening reception 1/18, 7 PM). Marky Kauffmann curated the exhibition.

Kenji Nakayama and Ben Sloat are among the artists in the exhibition All That Glitters Is Not Gold at Drive-by Projects (1/28-3/11, reception 1/28, 4-6 PM).

Rachel Perry, Joe Wardwell, and Deb Todd Wheeler are among the artists exhibiting in Loud and Clear at Miller Yezerski Gallery (1/6-2/7).

Daniela Rivera and Evelyn Rydz are both exhibiting in latinx@mericañaza at Samson Projects.

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Kati Agócs had the U.S. premiere of her string quarter Tantric Variations, performed by the Cecilia String Quartet on Stradivari instruments, at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. in December.

Alexandra Anthony has a one-week theatrical run of her film Lost in the Bewilderness in Athens, Greece (1/12-1/18) at the Alkyonis Art Cinema. National Greek TV (ERT) will broadcast the film 1/15. The film’s December premiere in Greece received press attention in Madame Figaro and THETOC.gr.

Carrie Bennett has poetry in Issue 30 of jubilat.

Steven Bogart has a staged reading of his play Rehearsal at First Church in Boston Unitarian Universalist (1/24, 7 PM).

David Bookbinder has recently published two books: 52 (more) Flower Mandalas (an adult coloring book collaboration with Mary O’Malley) and Paths to Wholeness: Fifty-Two Flower Mandalas.

Rebecca Doughty has a new picture book, Before You, which will have a book launch event at Joie de Vivre in Cambridge (1/15, 4-6 PM).

Michael Dowling co-wrote the feature film Brave New Jersey, and it’s screening at the Berkshire Film Festival (1/12, 6 PM reception, 7 PM screening, q&a to follow).

Samantha Fields has a performative sculptural installation in the exhibition Is this Something at the Lasell College Wedeman Gallery (1/24-2/11, reception 1/29, 4-6 PM). Next summer, she will be Artist-in-Residence at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin.

Sean Greene has a solo exhibition, Impulse Control, at the Williston Northampton School Grubbs Gallery (thru 1/30, reception 1/14, 1 PM).

Carrie Gustafson is exhibiting in the New York Ceramics and Glass Fair (1/18-1/22).

Michael Hoerman‘s poems “Disoriented Fascination,” “The God-box Killer,” and “The B-side of Stuxnet,” published in Eureka Literary Magazine, were nominated for the Pushcart Prize.

Eric Hofbauer‘s album Three Places in New England (with The Eric Hofbauer Quintet) was named one of the Boston Globe’s Top Ten Jazz Albums of 2016.

Joel Janowitz has a solo exhibition, Protected Trees, presented by Cambridge Arts at Gallery 344 (1/23-4/7, reception 1/30, 6-8 PM).

Niho Kozuru is among the artists in Plastic Imagination Fitchburg Art Museum (thru 1/15).

Scott Listfield is exhibiting in Supersonic Invitational (New York City), Platinum Blend 3 at Modern Eden Gallery (San Francisco), BRINK at Antler Gallery (Portland), and a Rick and Morty-themed exhibition at Gallery 1988 in LA.

Caitlin McCarthy is included in the book The Top 100 Indie Writers in the World.

Nathalie Miebach is in the group show Weather or Not, That Is the Question at the Children’s Museum of New York City (1/16-5/23). She’s also exhibiting in Rooted, Revived, Reinvented: Basketry in America at the University of Missouri Museum of Art and Archeology (1/27-5/14).

Anna Ross has a poem, Back Porch Aubade, published on Harvard Review Online.

Evelyn Rydz‘s exhibition Floating Artifacts is at Tufts University Art Gallery (1/24-5/21, opening reception 1/26, 5-7:30 PM). As mentioned above, she’s also exhibiting in latinx@mericañaza at Samson Projects.

Jenine Shereos has a solo show of new work, Thaw, at Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston (1/14-3/8, reception 2/25, 5-7 PM).

Karen Skolfield won the Jeffrey Smith Editors’ Prize in poetry at Missouri Review.

Shubha Sunder wrote about the writing workshop experience for the Grub Street’s GrubWrites blog.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: cover art for BEFORE YOU by Rebecca Doughty (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2017).

How Do You Approach Art-making During Times of Emotional Distress?

Tuesday, December 6th, 2016

Recently, WBUR had a story about how events out of our control – such as the recent election – create stress and internal turmoil that can disrupt all aspects of our lives.

For artists creating (or trying to create) new work, this can mean a serious disruption of their art-making process. We asked artists, How do you approach art-making during times of emotional distress?

Jodie Mim Goodnough, NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL (2015) from the PROSPECT project, Three Inkjet Prints on Cotton Lawn, 36x78 in

Jodie Mim Goodnough, multidisciplinary artist
My work for years has been about emotional distress, both mild and pathological, and the coping mechanisms we use to self-soothe, so you’d think I’d have all the tools I need. Based on the research for my recent work, what I should be doing is going for long walks in the woods and taking deep breaths of forest air. What I’m actually doing, however, is sitting on the couch reading about how much better I would feel if I went for a walk in the woods.

But if I’ve learned one thing, it’s that you can’t beat yourself up for slowing down occasionally – it only compounds the misery. When I don’t have it in me to hit the studio I do small things in the direction of productivity. I research and I plan for future projects. And I look for non-art tasks that feel productive as well, like studying Spanish. I’m currently living in Providence, which has a large Latino population. I feel like I need to find ways to better connect with people in my community right now, and learning another language, even at a basic level, will help me do that.

Jessica Reik, writer
There are always emotions. Some of them are more uncomfortable for me to be with than others. Some, like elation, feel really good but interfere with my ability to write – elation wants the external and so I’m out doing, not home writing! Fear, sadness, insecurity, they pose different challenges. Seeming bottomless (they never are), they threaten to take over the executive self and with it, all those evolved capacities of the human brain – like perspective – I rely on to write.

I like to sit with a difficult emotion and feel where it’s lodged in my body, then find out what’s underneath. Take fear (often in my lower abdomen). Fundamentally, it’s a lack of basic safety, so I look for that safety in tangible ways and identify what is trustworthy and supportive — my bones, my breath, the chair I’m sitting in. Simple stuff. I like to give structure for the emotion, a house I’ve built for it to roam around in, because the emotion itself isn’t the problem, it’s my reaction to it.

Always, in the end, I find myself in the same place at the end of this process — back to the work. My writing comes out of those very same vulnerable places where sadness takes root — where all emotions do — and yet is also one of the sources of stability that gets me through.

Michael Joseph, photographer
In times of emotional stress, not only making art, but also viewing art can provide a much-needed emotional release. Often my most productive periods are when I feel a need to disconnect with my own internal stressors and reconnect with life that is happening around me. Grabbing my camera and going for a walk breaks up a physically sedentary day but also an emotionally clouded one.

Street photography is unique in that it allows the artist to be present with the world in a way that working in a studio cannot. It shifts our role from being a participant to being an observer. Working on the street has a unique duality: the sometimes frustrating challenge of dealing with the unforeseen but also the excitement and reward of capturing the serendipitous. Events out of our control and uncertainty therefore become positives. By paying close attention to unpredictable actions and emotions of others in fluid environments, we are forced to focus less on our own internal thoughts to capture external narratives in real time.

I always saw the camera as a powerful tool of connection. Making street portraits of strangers whose personalities and places in the world are different from my own, forces me to engage with others and learn from them. It presents the challenge of making their unique, internal story come to the surface through a portrait. There is no time for subjects to look in the mirror, change clothes, fix hair or put on make-up, and I can’t ask the sun to change or the clouds to move… I am forced to make art from what is before me. And in that reality, I make my most powerful work.

Michael Joseph, SOPHIE (2013), archival pigment print, 16x16 in

 

Jodie Mim Goodnough is a Providence, Rhode Island-based artist whose work revolves around the use of images in psychology and psychiatry, and includes photography, sculpture, performance, video and sound. Recently, she received a 2017 Rhode Island State Council on the Arts Fellowship in Photography and was named a 2017 Traveling Fellow by the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University. Her work will exhibit in Building a Lineage at Piano Craft Gallery in Boston, January 2017.

Michael Joseph is a street and street portrait photographer. His “Lost and Found” series, which has been featured on CNN, will be included in the December 8 slide presentation night (Dec 8, 6:30 PM) to complement IDENTITY: The List Portraits at The Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles. Recently honored in PhotoLucida’s Critical Mass 2016 Top 50 list, he’ll have work in the accompanying exhibition (Apr 7-May 2 at the Artwork Network Gallery Space in Denver). He has an article coming out in the December issue of the Czech Republic magazine CILICHILI. Find him on Instagram and Facebook.

Writer Jessica Reik was awarded a fellowship position in Grub Street’s Memoir Incubator Program, where she worked on the memoir The Fathom-Long Body. Recently, she received a fellowship to attend a Ucross Foundation residency and was named a finalist in StoryQuarterly Non Fiction Prize. On Tuesday, January 17, 2017, at 7 PM, she’ll read her work in an event featuring MCC literary awardees.

Images: Jodie Mim Goodnough, NORTHAMPTON STATE HOSPITAL (2015) from the PROSPECT project, three Inkjet Prints on cotton lawn, 36×78 in; Michael Joseph, SOPHIE (2013), archival pigment print, 16×16 in.

Fellows Notes – Dec 16

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

Here’s a December-ific roundup of the latest news from MCC’s Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Kelly Popoff, BARRICADE (2015), oil on canvas, 63x88 in

Laura Baring-Gould, Niho Kozuru, and Gretchen Romey-Tanzer are all exhibiting in CraftBoston Holiday (12/2-12/4) at Hynes Convention Center.

David Bookbinder and Mary O’Malley have collaborated on the adult coloring book 52 (more) Flower Mandalas. Mary converted David’s “flower mandala” photographs into illustrations, to color for inspiration and stress relief.

Ryan P. Casey, Wendy Jehlen, and Candice Salyers have all received funding in the inaugural cycle of NEFA’s New England Dance Fund.

Sean Downey, Cristi Rinklin, Joe Wardwell are exhibiting in Irregular Landscapes (thru 2/22, opening reception 12/8, 6-8 PM) at the Hynes Convention Center.

Nicole Duennebier, Asia Kepka, Rachel Mello, Mary O’Malley, and Nina Wishnok are all exhibiting in Plenty at 13 Forest Gallery (thru 1/14).

Warner Friedman, Janet Rickus, and Dawn Southworth at SCOPE Miami Beach with Clark Gallery (12/1-12/4).

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Sophia Ainslie is participating in Vernon Street Open Studios (12/3-12/4). She also has work in Holiday Smalls at Gallery NAGA (12/17). Recently, she completed a commissioned mural for the lobby of Enso Flats in Brockton.

Alexandra Anthony will attend the official Athens, Greece premiere of her film Lost in the Bewilderness (12,15, 7:30 PM, Alkyonis New Star Cinema). Read about the event.

Robert Beavers is among the artists in the 2017 Whitney Biennial.

Ben Berman will have a new book of poems, Figuring in the Figure, coming out from Able Muse Press, March 2017 (now available for pre-order).

Cree Bruins has a solo show, Drawn to Light, at Kingston Gallery (thru 1/1).

Caleb Cole‘s photography exhibition Other People’s Clothes is at the Mayor’s Art Gallery of Boston City Hall (thru 12/9). He’s also exhibiting in Fertile Solitude at the Boston Center for the Arts Mills Gallery (thru 12/18).

Mary Jane Doherty has two upcoming screenings: her dance documentary Secundaria screens at Prince Theater in Philadelphia (12/14, 7 PM), hosted by the Pennsylvania Ballet and Philadelphia Film Society. Her film Primaria has its Latin American premiere at La Festival Internacional del Nuevo Cine LatinoAmericano in Havana, Cuba (12/16, 5:30 PM).

Amy Dryansky reads at Blacksmith House (with Paul Breslin, 12/12, 8 PM), as part of the Blacksmith House Poetry Series.

Congratulations to Janet Echelman, who recently won a fellowship from United States Artists.

Christy Georg has work in the group exhibition Breaking the Block at the Santa Fe Convention Center Community Gallery (12/16-3/2, reception 12/16, 5-7 PM). She is also featured at the New Mexico Museum of Art in the Alcoves series: small one-person exhibitions featuring contemporary artists working in New Mexico (12/9-1/29, reception 12/11, 10:30 AM-12 PM).

Asia Kepka has a booksigning at 13 Forest Gallery (12/8, 6-8 PM) for the book Horace and Agnes: A Love Story, along with co-creator Lynn Dowling.

Jesse Kreitzer has received the James Goldstone Award for Emerging Vermont Filmmaker from the Vermont International Film Foundation, with an awards ceremony 12/15, 7 PM, at the Main Street Landing Film House.

Scott Listfield has work in SCOPE Miami Beach, through Thinkspace Gallery (11/29-12/4).

Rania Matar is exhibiting at PULSE Miami Beach with Pictura Gallery (12/1-12/4).

Rachel Mello has a solo show, That Space Between Flying and Falling, at Laconia Gallery (thru 12/18, artist talk 12/2, 6:30-7 PM).

Kelly Popoff has a solo show, O Children at Herter Art Gallery at UMass Amherst (thru 12/16).

Monica Raymond is part of the first Artists’ Lab at Studio 550 in Cambridge, which is having an end-of-lab open (12/7, 10 AM-1 PM) at 550 Mass Ave, Cambridge.

Jendi Reiter‘s short story “Taking Down the Pear Tree” won the 2016 New Letters Prize for Fiction from the literary journal of the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

Susan Rivo‘s documentary Left on Pearl was accepted at the Black Maria Film Festival, with the additional honor of receiving a Director’s Choice Award.

Kay Ruane has an exhibition, Two Drawings, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 12/23, artist reception 12/2, 5-8 PM).

Karl Stevens has a weekly comic strip, Penny, in The Village Voice.

Sarah Wentworth has a solo show of performed photos of Fishline Creature at the St Botolph Club (12/7-1/13, opening reception 12/7, 5:30-7 PM). Also, her work has been included in White Columns’ Artist Registry.

Michael Zelehoski has a solo show, Surface Tension, at Mackin Projects (12/10-1/7, opening reception 12/11, 6-8 PM).

Michael Zelehoski, ANIMISM (2016), assemblage with repurposed wood and florescent bulbs, 65x67 in

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Images: Kelly Popoff, BARRICADE (2015), oil on canvas, 63×88 in; Michael Zelehoski, ANIMISM (2016), assemblage with repurposed wood and florescent bulbs, 65×67 in.

Fellows Notes – Nov 16

Thursday, November 3rd, 2016

It’s November, a month to vote, eat sweet potato casserole, and celebrate new art.

Here’s the latest news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Liza Bingham, CARTOON CONTRAIL (2016), acrylic and oil on muslin over panel, 14x20 in

Claire Beckett, Caleb Cole, and Stephen Tourlentes will participate in an Artadia Art & Dialogue event with Whitney Museum of Art Curator Elisabeth Sherman (11/9, 6:30-8:30 PM) at the MassArt Design and Media Center Lecture Hall.

MCC Artist Fellowship Program awardees Kathleen Brennan, Anna V.Q. Ross, and Gary Whited read at the Public Library of Brookline (11/15, 7 PM).

Michael Joseph and Molly Lamb are both included in PhotoLucida’s Critical Mass 2016 Top 50 list.

Congratulations to Georgie Freidman and Emily Lombardo, both of whom are among the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA) 2017 Traveling Fellows.

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Kati AgocsThe Debrecen Passion is Music Web International’s Recording of the Month. Two songs from the album are up for consideration on the 2017 Grammy ballot.

Liza Bingham has a solo exhibition of paintings, Hot Pink, Soft Pink, Rusty Orange, White, at the new Boston project space and gallery How’s Howard (11/4-12/11, opening reception 11/4 5-9 PM).

Janet Echelman will give a presentation, Soft Structure: Sculpting at the Scale of Cities, hosted by the MIT Department of Architecture, on 11/17, 6-8 PM.

Georgie Friedman has work in Constructed Video at Boston Cyberarts Gallery (11/12-12/18, reception 11/11, 6-8 PM). Also, she has a site-specific video installation at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Traces of Wind and Water (thru 11/14), with “Artist Hours” at the site 11/6, 5-6:30 PM. (See news about the artist’s award from SMFA, above.)

Raul Gonzalez has a solo exhibition of drawings and paintings, Forbidden Frontera, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (11/2-12/21, reception 11/4 5:30-7:30 PM).

Justin Kimball has a solo exhibition of photography, Elegy, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (11/2-12/21, reception 11/4 5:30-7:30 PM). Signed copies of Justin Kimball’s book Elegy will be available for purchase.

Niho Kozuru has a solo show, Positive Vibration, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 11/15, opening reception 11/4, 5-8 PM).

Danielle Legros Georges will read at the MIT Stata Center (11/7, 7 PM) and at Porter Square Books (with Kirun Kapur and Steve Yarbrough, 11/11, 7 PM). Her book The Dear Remote Nearness of You was awarded the 2016 Sheila Motton Book Prize by the New England Poetry Club. She will be sitting on the panel “New Directions in Caribbean Poetry” at the Miami Book Fair (11/20).

Scott Listfield is among the artists in Lunar Attraction (thru 9/4/2017) at Peabody Essex Museum. He’s also in the two-person exhibition Anthropecene at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR. Read an interview with the artist on the gallery’s blog.

Melinda Lopez has a new, one-woman play, Mala, at ArtsEmerson (thru 11/20). In recognition of the playwright’s achievements, Mayor Marty Walsh named October 29, 2016 Melinda Lopez Day in Boston. Read excellent reviews of Mala in the Boston Globe, WBUR’s ARTery, and Boston Magazine.

Rachel Mello has a solo exhibition, That Space Between Flying and Falling at Laconia Gallery (thru 12/18, Artist’s Talk 12/2, 6:30-7 PM).

Nathalie Miebach is exhibiting in the group show Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at Akron Art Museum (thru 1/15). The museum will host a concert featuring work by Boston composers Christian Gentry and Mischa Salkind-Pearl, created in collaboration with Nathalie Miebach (11/3, 7 PM). Also this month, the artist has talks or events at the University of Akron Synapse Art Science Lecture series (11/2), the Sculpture Center in Cleveland (11/4, 11/5) and the New York Art Teacher Association at their annual conference in Albany, NY (11/18).

James Morrow and his dance company, james morrow/The Movement, present A Quarter Past Midnight at the Boston Center for the Arts Calderwood Pavilion (11/11 and 11/12, 8 PM). The performance is part of the dance artist’s Choreography Residency at the BCA.

Carl Phillips will read in the Blacksmith House Poetry Series (11/7, 8 PM).

Monica Raymond was selected as a Visiting Scholar for 2016-2018 at the Brandeis Women’s Studies Research Center. Also, “The Bag Song” from Paper of Plastic (an opera co-created with composer Charles Turner and performed at the Arkansas Science Slam in Oct) won Rough Magic Shakespeare Company‘s First Prize for a science song.

Jo Ann Rothschild is in the group exhibition Painting Is Not a Good Idea at HallSpace in Dorchester (11/19-1/7, opening reception 11/19, 3-6 PM).

Tracy Heather Strain and Randall MacLowry‘s film company, The Film Posse, created The Battle of Chosin, the latest documentary on the PBS series American Experience.

August Ventimiglia is among the artists in Wood + Paper + Earth at Drive-By Projects (11/5-12/17, reception 11/5, 4-6 PM).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show at LaMontagne Gallery in Winchester (thru 11/11) and another exhibition, Soon I Will Be President at Southern New Hampshire University McIninch Art Gallery (11/3-12/17, opening reception and artist talk 11/3, 5-7 PM).

Elizabeth Whyte Schulze‘s exquisite basketry, described as “three dimensional paintings,” are the Spotlight Exhibition at Mobilia Gallery (thru 12/15).

Suara Welitoff has an exhibition of multimedia and installation work, What Time This Feels at 186 Carpenter in Providence, RI (thru 12/10).

Cary Wolinsky has a solo exhibition of photography, Cary Wolinsky: Fiber of Life at Fuller Craft Museum (thru 2/26).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Liza Bingham, CARTOON CONTRAIL (2016), acrylic and oil on muslin over panel, 14×20 in.

MCC Literary Artists Read

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

Every two years, the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) awards grants to some of the most talented writers and poets working in the Commonwealth. Literary artists awarded through MCC’s Artist Fellowships Program will share work at Trident Booksellers and Cafe on Tuesday, January 17, 2017, 7 PM.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017, 7 PM
Trident Booksellers and Cafe, 338 Newbury Street, Boston, MA
Readers:
Christopher Castellani
Scott Challener
Aaron Krol
Sean P. McCarthy
Jessica Reik

Find the event on Facebook.

The event is free, accessible, and open to the public.

Recent event

Every two years, the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) awards grants to some of the most talented writers and poets working in the Commonwealth. Literary artists awarded through MCC’s Artist Fellowships Program will share work at the Public Library of Brookline on Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 7 PM.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 7 PM
The Public Library of Brookline, Hunneman Hall, 361 Washington Street, Brookline, MA
Readers:
Kathleen Brennan
Anna VQ Ross
Gary Whited

Find the event on Facebook.

The event is free, accessible, and open to the public. Watch for more events with MCC-awarded writers and poets in the weeks and months ahead.

Fellows Notes – Oct 16

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

October-y news from current and past MCC Artist Fellows/Finalists.

Shelley Reed, ON THE WALL (AFTER HONDECOETER) (2010), oil on canvas, 48x36 in

Caleb Cole, Dana Filibert, Shelley Reed, and Sarah Wentworth are among the artist exhibiting in Fertile Solitude at the Mills Gallery at Boston Center for the Arts (10/14-12/18, opening reception 10/14, 6-8 PM). The exhibition, curated by FLUX.Boston creator Elizabeth Devlin, explores the idea of reprieve from everyday life through the physical framework of a maze that exhibition visitors are free to explore.

MCC Artist Fellows and Finalists will read at Forbes Library in Northampton (10/19, 7 PM). The readers are D M Gordon, Heather Kamins, Richard Michelson, Sarah Sousa, and Elizabeth Witte. Learn more and find the event on Facebook.

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Sachiko Akiyama has a solo exhibition of paintings and sculptures, Sachiko Akiyama: Between Here and There, at Matter & Light Fine Art (thru 10/31).

Alexandra Anthony‘s film Lost in the Bewilderness screens at the Robbins Library in Arlington, MA (10/20, 7 PM), as part of the Arlington International Film Festival’s 2016 Robbins Library Monthly Film Series. Free and open to the public, Q & A with Alexandra Anthony to follow.

Alice Bouvrie is screening her film A Chance To Dress at MIT (10/13, 7 PM). The filmmaker along with the subjects of the film, Dr. John “Tephra” Southard and his wife, Rev. Jean Southard, will be present for a post-screening Q & A.

Matt Brackett‘s first solo show in Boston in four years will take place at Alpha Gallery (10/7-11/2, opening reception 10/7, 6-8 PM). One of the included paintings, Moonstone, was one of 35 works out of over 2,400 applicants to receive a Certificate of Excellence in the Portrait Society of America’s International Portrait Competition last spring. See the artist’s Studio Views post on ArtSake.

Charles Coe is among the artists selected for the Boston Artists-in-Residence Program.

Mary Jane Doherty will have the West Coast premiere of her documentary Primaria at the San Francisco Dance Film Festival (10/23, 2 PM).

Tory Fair has a solo show of drawing/sculpture hybrids, Tory Fair: Paperweight at VERY in Boston (thru 10/22).

Jake Fried‘s animation was featured on the science technology/pop culture blog io9.

Georgie Friedman has unveiled a site-specific video installation at the Strand Theatre in Dorchester, Traces of Wind and Water (thru 11/14), part of her work as a City of Boston Artist in Residence Program. There is a Boston AIR reception 11/14 at the Strand.

Beth Galston has a solo show at the Cynthia Reeves Gallery in North Adams (thru 11/13).

Marky Kauffmann was invited to participate in the Berlin Foto Biennale after being named a finalist in the 2015 Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women Photographers. Also, she’ll exhibit in the group show Mirror with a Memory at the Peter Miller Gallery in Providence, RI (10/20-11/12, opening reception 10/20, 5-9 PM).

Lisa Kessler received a George Gund Foundation commission to photograph in the Cleveland public schools. The photography collection will be on exhibit at the Cleveland Public Main Library in downtown Cleveland (thru 10/28). A smaller traveling exhibit will be on display at several library branches around the city.

Colleen Kiely will have a solo show at the Simmons College Trustman Art Gallery (10/11-11/9, opening reception 10/20, 5-7 PM, artist’s talk 10/26, 12-1 PM). She’ll also have work in the pop-up exhibit Stark Naked at Gallery Kayafas, 10/16, 7-10 PM.

Niho Kozuru has a solo show, Positive Vibration, at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 11/15).

Dawn Kramer, along with Stephen Buck, will participate in this year’s Roslindale Open Studios (10/22-10/23).

Yary Livan was featured in the Lowell Sun.

Melinda Lopez has a new play, Mala, at ArtsEmerson (10/27-11/20). Also, she contributed a short play to Still Waiting a series of vignettes created to accompany the play Waiting for Lefty at Boston College Robsham Theatre (10/13-10/16).

Tara Masih is the Series Editor for the annual Best Small Fictions series, which just published the 2016 edition.

Rania Matar has photography in the exhibition Mortal Things: Portraits Look Back and Forth at Tufts University Art Center (thru 12/4). Her solo show Becoming: Girls, Women, and Coming of Age exhibits at Pictura Gallery in Bloomington, IN (10/7-11/26, opening reception 10/7 5-8 PM, artist talk 10/11, 7 PM). In December, that same gallery will exhibit Rania’s work in Pulse Miami. Her work is included in Aftermath: The Fallout of War – America and the Middle East at Harn Museum of Art in Gainesville, FL (thru 12/ 31. artist talk 10/23, 2 PM) Her work is also exhibiting at Galerie Janine Rubeiz, Beirut Lebanon and at C. Grimaldis Gallery

Mary Bucci McCoy is in the experimental group exhibition Fiction (With Only Daylight Between Us) at boeckercontemporary in Heidelberg, Germany (10/15-31). Also, she will have a public conversation with Brooklyn artist David Mann at Rafius Fane Gallery in SoWa, Boston (10/8, 2-4 PM).

Joshua Meyer has a solo show, Seek My Face: The Art of Joshua Meyer, 2000-2016 at The Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts at UCLA (thru 12/23, reception 10/27, 7-9 PM).

Richard Michelson was featured in WBUR Radio for his children’s book about Leonard Nimoy, Fascinating.

Nathalie Miebach is in the group show Intersections: Artists Master Line and Space at Akron Art Museum (thru 1/15). Also, she’ll give a talk at Ohio Wesleyan University (10/19, 7 PM) as part of the Sagan National Colloquium.

Ethan Murrow has a large-scale wall drawing in Escape Routes at the John Michael Kohler Art Center in Sheboygan, WI (thru 1/15). See an interview about the process.

Jendi Reiter‘s debut novel Two Natures was published in September by Saddle Road Press. Broadside Bookshop in Northampton, MA is hosting her local book launch (10/19, 7 PM).

Jo Ann Rothschild will exhibit work in the Fall Open House at the Studio at 535 Albany Street in Boston (10/27, 5-8 PM).

Samuel Rowlett has a solo exhibition of recent multimedia work, A Thing Not Planned for Imagery or Belief, on view in the South Gallery at Greenfield Community College (thru 11/3). There will be a gallery talk 10/26, 12 PM, and a closing reception 11/2, 5:30-7 PM.

James Rutenbeck‘s film Class of ’27 is an Editor’s Pick from The Atlantic.

Jane Smaldone‘s exhibition Rocks & Roses and The Return of the Fox shows at Clark Gallery in Lincoln (thru 10/31).

Stephen Tourlentes has work in the group exhibition Surveillance at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO (thru 1/29).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show at LaMontagne Gallery in Winchester (thru 11/11) and another exhibition, Soon I Will Be President at Southern New Hampshire University McIninch Art Gallery (11/3-12/17, opening reception and artist talk 11/3, 5-7 PM).

Cary Wolinsky has a solo exhibition of photography, Cary Wolinsky: Fiber of Life at Fuller Craft Museum (10/8-2/26, opening reception 11/6, 2-5 PM).

Jung Yun reads from her novel Shelter at Busboys and Poets in Washington, D.C. in honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month (10/5, 6-8 PM), sponsored by the Asian/Pacific Islander Domestic Violence Resource Project.

Angela Zammarelli is exhibiting in the group show The Unity of Opposites at A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton, MA (thru 10/30, opening reception 10/14, 5-8 PM). She is currently in residence at The Studios at MASS MoCA and will be participating in an open studios 10/19, 5-7 PM.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Images and media: Shelley Reed, ON THE WALL (AFTER HONDECOETER) (2010), oil on canvas, 48×36 in; Alexandra Anthony’s interview from the 40 Years of Fellowships Project.

MCC Literary Awardees Read at Forbes Library

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

Every two years, the Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) awards grants to some of the most talented writers and poets working in the Commonwealth. Literary artists awarded through MCC’s Artist Fellowships Program will share work at the Forbes Library on Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 7 PM.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016, 7 PM
Forbes Library, 20 West Street, Northampton MA
Readers:
D M Gordon
Heather Kamins
Richard Michelson
Sarah Sousa
Elizabeth Witte

Find the event on Facebook.

The event is free, accessible, and open to the public. Watch for more events with MCC-awarded writers and poets in the weeks and months ahead.

Historic Artist Opportunities

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

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Of Note: The National Museum of African American History & Culture has opened in Washington DC.

Poets Entries are now being accepted for the New Criterion’s Poetry Prize of $3,000 and publication by St. Augustine’s Press. The prize is given annually for a poetry collection that pays close attention to form. Erica Dawson, Roger Kimball, and David Yezzi will judge. Submit a manuscript of up to 60 pages with a $25 entry fee byVisit the website for complete guidelines. Learn more.
Deadline:  September 30, 2016

Artist Business Grants MASS MoCA’s Assets for Artists program is seeking Boston-based applicants for its Matched Savings Program, which supports creative entrepreneurs with a matching grant and artist-focused business and financial training. Eligible applicants must have a home or studio address in the City of Boston. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Poets, Fiction Writers Entries are currently being accepted for the University of Massachusetts Press Juniper Prizes. Four prizes of $1,000 each and publication by University of Massachusetts Press are given annually for a first poetry collection, a poetry collection, a short story collection, and a novel or novella. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Short Fiction Entries are now being accepted for the University of Iowa Press Short Fiction Awards. Two awards of publication by University of Iowa Press are given annually for first collections of short fiction. Writers who have not published a book of fiction are eligible. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

MCC Artist Fellowships The Massachusetts Cultural Council is currently accepting Artist Fellowship applications for Crafts, Dramatic Writing, and Sculpture/Installation/New Genres. Artist Fellowships are unrestricted, anonymously judged grants for Massachusetts artists in recognition of artistic excellence. Fellowship awards are currently $12,000. Finalist awards are $1,000. Learn more.
Deadline: Monday, October 3, 2016

STARS Residencies The Massachusetts Cultural Council’s STARS Residencies Program (Students and Teachers Working with Artists, Scientists, and Scholars) provides grants of $500-$5,000 to schools to support creative learning residencies of three days or more in the arts, sciences, and humanities. Learn more.
Application opens October 6, 2016 at 4pm

Videos, Animations, Computer Generated Work Proposals for the next round of Art on the Marquee are currently being accepted. Looking for work 30 second videos, animations or computer generated work, that use the entire Marquee in creative ways. Please submit a storyboard, statement, work samples, and CV to info@bostoncyberarts.org The call is limited to artists who live anywhere in the state of Massachusetts. Learn more.
Deadline: October 16th, 2016 (midnight)

Boston Choreographers The Boston Foundation and The Aliad Fund have announced Next Steps for Boston Dance, a new grant program that provides multi-layered support for Boston-area choreographers creating original work in any genre. Offers 250 hours of rehearsal space; 6-10 consultations with experts in chosen areas of need/interest; $5,000 in implementation funds for the artist to take a “next step” in his/her work or career; a series of cohort meetings to connect choreographers, build relationships, and allow for co-learning. A minimum of three grants will be awarded in this pilot round/first year of Next Steps. Learn more.
Deadline: Oct 24, 2016 at 5pm

Ten-minute Plays Submissions of ten-minute plays by New England playwrights are now being accepted for the Boston Theater Marathon XIX to be held May 14, 2017, at the Stanford Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts. Learn more.
Deadline: November 15, 2016

Writing Conference Scholarships If you’re interested in attending Muse and the Marketplace, GrubStreet’s national conference for writers, in Boston Spring 2017 but could use financial support, GrubStreet is offering numerous $250 scholarships for attendees. Learn more.
Deadline: November 21, 2016

Image credit: Circa 1940s: “Miss America.” (Joe Schwartz). From the photography collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Seldom Discussed Artist Issues

Monday, September 12th, 2016

Periodically, we pose questions to artists about issues they face in their work and lives.

Whether because they’re hard to talk about or because they just fly under the radar, some issues don’t get a lot of discussion on forums such as this blog. This month, we’re asking, What issues do you see artists grappling with that don’t often get discussed?

Camera Obscura photography by Marian Roth

Marian Roth, photography artist
Much of what causes me the most angst is an internal dialogue about my work and its place in the universe of “art.” One form it takes is my worry that my current work is too “far out” in respect to other photography. My friend Midge, who like me, works in photography and painting, blames our more generalized self-doubt on the nagging remnants of second place citizenry for those of us who work with photographic image making.

It’s been a long and ongoing history of gaining acceptance for photography, and that feeds a crazy kind of internalized prejudice, in which I continuously defend myself to myself. This year I blessedly received a Pollock-Krasner Grant, but they have only just begun allowing artists to apply in the field of “fine art photography” and, unlike other artists, we must be invited to apply. So I guess, one of the things I don’t think we all talk about very much are “art prejudices” – all of them – and how they become internalized and worm their way into our psyches. I think most of us cut ourselves down with self-doubt that is internalized marginalization.

Jane Dykema, writer
A challenge many writers deal with silently is others’ and our own perceptions of productivity, the time it takes to make something, and the ways we actually need to spend that time. So much of the writing process is sitting and staring, or starting to read 500 books and only finishing five, or waiting for enough time to pass so we can re-see a piece from which we need distance. It’s hard to justify to others, and worse, ourselves, that we need to protect this time, this 30 minutes or three hours, even if it’s spent staring at the wall, or writing one sentence and deleting it, or editing a piece and realizing the next day it was better before. We have to believe there’s no wasted time, that all these steps are absolutely necessary for the end product to exist. When we don’t believe that, we’re overly encouraged by days where we generate a lot of content, making the days when that naturally doesn’t happen more discouraging. And we’re overly discouraged by days spent pacing or undoing work we’d done, making it harder to get motivated to work the next day. Ideally, a writer would feel as accomplished after a session of staring as of writing, and we need the help of our communities to value the process as much as the product.

Our Take
The Massachusetts Cultural Council is proud to support individual artists and consequently, we get to meet and work with a lot of different individual artists. One issue we see coming up frequently is residency and the way it impacts availability of artist opportunities. Artists often discuss how residency in a big city – usually New York City or L.A. – can sometimes be seen as a signifier for an artist, a subtle badge of access to opportunities. We see a lot of artists with teaching positions or other ties in Massachusetts who keep a foot (re: a studio, a performance schedule, etc) in NYC for this very reason. But there are other, less-often discussed aspects of residency that impact artists. In her fascinating essay for ArtSake, poet Liz Waldner shares how challenges in livings costs and adjunct faculty employment led to her moving from place to place in a nomadic existence. On the plus side, an artist can be more open to opportunities when it’s easy to pull up stakes and move. On the other hand, health concerns (as Waldner discusses) are even more challenging when residency options are unstable or unknown. And from a practical point of view, many artist opportunities (like ours) require state or local residency.

What do you think? What issues do you see artists facing that don’t get a lot of attention or discussion? Let us know in an email or leave a comment.

 

Jane Dykema received an MCC Fiction/Creative Nonfiction Fellowship in 2016. She will read at the New Art Center on Sept 30, 7 PM, in an event in conjunction with MCC Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts.

Marian Roth received an MCC Photography Fellowship in 1997. Her solo show Marian Roth: The Mysterious World of Camera Obscura exhibits at the Griffin Museum of Photography thru Oct 2, 2016. On September 25, there will be an artist talk (3 PM) and reception (4 PM).

Image: Camera obscura photography by Marian Roth.

Fellows Notes – Sep 16

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

Back to school, kiddos! Here’s the latest news from our esteemed alumni – the past awardees of our Artist Fellowships Program.

Ethan Murrow, RIPARIAN LAW (2016), graphite on paper, 36x36in

The Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC) and the New Art Center in Newton (NAC) join together to present the MCC Artist Fellows in Painting, Choreography, Drawing & Printmaking, and Traditional Arts (9/16-10/15, opening reception 9/16, 6-8 PM). The exhibition will feature: in Painting – Dennis Congdon, Nicole Duennebier, Raúl Gonzalez, Joel Janowitz, Catherine Kehoe, Andrew Gordon Moore, and Cristi Rinklin; in Drawing & Printmaking – Kim Carlino, Erica Daborn, Linda Etcoff, Kevin Frances, Emily Lombardo, Stephen Mishol, and Ethan Murrow; in Choreography – Dahlia Nayar, Candice Salyers, and Sara L Smith; and in Traditional Arts – Dimitrios Klitsas.

MCC Choreography Fellow Candice Salyers will perform and literary awardees Jane Dykema, Michael Lowenthal, Shubha Sunder, Sheryl White, and Kris Willcox will read at the New Art Center (9/30, 6:30 dance performance, 7 PM reading). Look for more readings by MCC literary Fellows/Finalists in the months ahead.

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Elizabeth Alexander has a solo show, I May Not Be a Lion exhibiting at Elon University in North Carolina (thru 10/6). Watch her artist talk about the show. Also, she is in the group exhibition For the Saturday Evening Girls at Drive-By Projects (9/17-10/29, opening reception 9/17, 4-6 PM).

Marilyn Arsem performs as part of the Arctic Action: International Action Art Festival in Svalbard, Norway (9/19-9/28).

Sarah Bliss co-created a site-specific 16mm film sculpture-installation, pump, filter, reflect, with Chrissy Hunt and Anto Astudillo, and it will be featured in Temporal Currents, a one-night-only live experimental film and sound event at Boston;s Metropolitan Waterworks Museum, featuring filmmakers from the AgX Film Collective and musicians from NonEvent.

John Cameron is in two exhibitions this month: Furniture Masters 2016: Distinctive at 3S ArtSpace in Portsmouth, NH (thru 9/25, Main Event on 9/25). Also, a showcase of work by recent exhibitors at the Smithsonian Craft Show, called D.C. Current, exhibits at the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Rockport, Maine (9/23-1/4, opening reception 9/23, 5-7 PM).

Stephen DiRado has been selected to receive the 35th ArtsWorcester Award (9/9, 6 PM), given annually to an individual who has made exceptional contributions to the artistic and cultural life of this city.

William Giraldi publishes a new memoir this month, The Hero’s Body. He’ll read from the book at Harvard Book Store (9/10, 7 PM).

Kelly Goff‘s installation Dumpster was featured in an article in the arts journal Hyperallergic about the 2016 Governor’s Island Art Fair.

Sean Greene is exhibiting in a two-person show (with Jen Simms) at Mingo Gallery in Beverly (thru 10/8, opening reception 9/9, 6 PM). He’s also in a group show at Mount Holyoke College Blanchard Gallery (thru 9/15, opening reception 9/8, 5:30 PM).

Colleen Kiely has drawings in About Face at UMass Amherst’s Augusta Savage Gallery (9/12-9/28).

Jesse Kreitzer‘s film Black Canaries was awarded the Vermont Symphony Orchestera’s VSO Award for Best Integration of Music into Film at the Middlebury Filmmakers Festival. The film also received Grand Jury Awards for “Best Short Film” and “Best Cinematography” at the 12th Annual HollyShorts Film Festival in Hollywood, California.

Danielle Legros Georges takes part in Living in Many Languages: Poetry And Music to Celebrate the Act of Translation at Dewey Square Parks (9/2, 2 PM). She’ll also read as part of the ICA Boston’s Powerful Words, an evening of readings, reflections, and community in response to violence, racial injustice, and trauma (9/8, 6 PM).

Sandy Litchfield has a solo show, Deciduious City, at Carroll and Sons Gallery (9/7-10/1, opening reception 9/9, 5:30 PM).

Tara Masih is the Series Editor for the annual Best Small Fictions series, which just published the 2016 edition.

Rania Matar exhibits her new photography series Invisible Children, capturing the portraits of young Syrian and Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, at C. Grimaldis Gallery in Baltimore (9/15-10/22, opening reception 9/15, 6-8 PM).

Caitlin McCarthy has essays in two upcoming nonfiction anthologies from McFarland & Company: She Loves You: Women Writers Tell How a Teen Idol Changed Their Life and Soap Opera Confidential: Writers and Soap Insiders on Why We’ll Tune in Tomorrow. Also, her script Wonder Drughighlighted in an article in Collective Evolution.

Richard Michelson is publishing a new children’s book, Fascinating: the Life of Leonard Nimoy. There will be a Publication Party and Book Signing (9/9, 6-8 PM) in conjunction with the opening of UNSEEN: Fifty Never Before Exhibited Photographs, in honor of the 50th Anniversary of Star Trek, at R. Michelson Galleries.

Nathalie Miebach is in a group show, Encircling the World: Contemporary Art, Science, and the Sublime at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design Bakalar Gallery (9/19-12/3, opening reception 9/19, 6-8 PM).

Ethan Murrow has a solo show of drawings, Water Almanac, at Winston Wächter Fine Art in NY (9/8-10/29, opening reception 9/8, 6-8 PM). The artist utilized portions of his MCC grant to support the creation of art for the show, which features drawings based on the Farmers Almanac.

Lisa Olivieri screens her film Blindsided at the Firehouse Center for the Arts in Newburyport (9/18, 12 PM). Q&A with the director to follow screening.

Monica Rayond‘s play A to Z was a finalist for both the Jane Chambers Award and ATHE Award for Excellence in Playwriting. Paper of Plastic, a short opera for which she wrote the libretto (music, Charles Turner), won second prize in Opera Kansas’s short opera competition.

Marian Roth has a solo exhibition, Marian Roth: The Mysterious World of the Camera Obscura, at the Griffin Museum of Photography (9/8-10/2, talk and reception 9/15, 5-8 PM).

Eric Henry Sanders will have a reading of his new play Where’s Annie? at the A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton (9/17, 7:30 PM).

Congratulations to Karen Skolfield, named a runner-up in the The Iowa Review’s Jeff Sharlet Memorial Award for Veterans writing contest. Five of her poems will be published in the Spring 2017 issue of Iowa Review. This month, she’s participating in events surrounding the Amherst Poetry Festival and Emily Dickinson Poetry Marathon 2016 (9/15-9/17).

Peter Snoad‘s short play Bull will be produced by The Landing Theatre in Houston as part of its Redemption series (9/21-10/3). The play is about the love/hate relationship of two New York City cops with Arturo DiModica’s iconic statue of the Charging Bull which they’re guarding during the Occupy Wall Street protests.

Naoe Suzuki, currently artist-in-residence at the Broad Institute, will have a public dialogue with Broad Institute founding core member Tod Golub called Collaborating at the Intersection of Art and Science (9/27, 3-4 PM).

Scott Wheeler composed the music for Naga, one of the three operas performed as part of the Ouroboros Trilogy at ArtsEmerson (9/10-9/17).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Ethan Murrow (Drawing & Printmaking Fellow ’16), RIPARIAN LAW (2016), graphite on paper, 36x36in.


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