Archive for the ‘film/video’ Category

Catching Artist Opportunities

Monday, July 7th, 2014

5876407671_4e29310e51_b

Land, sea, or air, ArtSake has it covered!

One Act Plays The Manhattan Repertory Theatre’s One Act Play Competition is looking for fully produced one act plays (cast, directed and ready to perform) 7 minutes to 20 minutes in length. $1,000 prize for Best Play. Each play will be given four performances, plus two extra performances if chosen to advance to the finals. They will supply a technician to run sound and lights. Learn more.
Deadline: July 21, 2014

Female Playwrights The Shakespeare’s Sister Fellowship provides a cash prize of $10,000 for a female playwright to write and develops a new play. In addition to the playwright will receive residencies at three geographically distinct institutions. Learn more.
Deadline: July 31, 2014

Residencies for Writers, Media, Visual and Performing Artists Yaddo in Saratoga Springs, NY, offers residencies of an average of 5 weeks for writers, media artists, visual artists and performing artists. Facilities include dance/choreography studios, exhibition/installation spaces, metal shop, music studio, and performing arts space. Residency provides housing, meals, studio, travel assistance, and materials stipend. Artists responsible for additional materials or travel costs. Learn more.
Deadline: August 1, 2014

Artist Grants Artist’s Resource Trust Fund has grants available in painting, sculpture, printmaking or mixed media to mid-career artists over 35 years old with financial need living in New England. Grants range from $2,000 to $10,000. Learn more.
Deadline: August 1, 2014

Film/Animation Glovebox Short Film & Animation Festival is currently accepting submissions. Short films (under 25 minutes) in the following categories: animation, documentary, dance, performance, fine art, conceptual, drama, comedy, narrative, music video. Learn more.
Deadline: August 1, 2014

Printmakers The Monotype Guild of New England is currently accepting entries for the ” Quarter Sheet: Almost Legal” print show at Zea Mays Studio. Learn more.
Deadline: August 15, 2014

Fund for Performing Arts Therapy The Emily List Fund for Performing Arts Therapy supports theatre, dance, and music projects aimed at helping the sick and disadvantaged in the interest of making their lives better and brighter through the performing arts. Grants of up to $1,000 to fund instruments or equipment for a music therapist working in a hospital; scholarships for young people to attend theatre camp; travel expenses for a chorus or theatre group; space for a dancer working with disabled or elderly people; payment for an instructor teaching arts to patients; tickets for groups to attend theatre performances they otherwise could not… and any other proposal along those lines. Grants are focused in the Pioneer Valley and at Mass General Hospital. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis year-round. Learn more.
Deadline: Rolling

Image credit: Photograph of Barbara Hughes cutting a back flip with beach ball (black ballet fashion) – Saint Petersburg Beach, Florida. From the State Library and Archives of Florida.

Fellows Notes – Jul 14

Monday, July 7th, 2014

It’s July and the mercury is climbing. Regulate the temp of, if not your home, then at least your Massachusetts pride with this month’s news and notes from past MCC Fellows/Finalists.


Video by Gallery NAGA of installation of the show On the Wall, which features MCC awardees Sophia Ainslie, Masako Kamiya, David Moore, and Randal Thurston, with John Guthrie (thru 7/11).

Elizabeth Alexander, Beth Galston, and Sarah Wentworth are among the artists in Winter at NAVE Gallery Annex in Davis Square, (7/17-8/16, opening reception 7/17, 6-8 PM).

Congratulations to Janet Echelman and Liz Nofziger, both of whom will create public art projects supported by NEFA’s recent public art grants. Janet will create an aerial sculpture in Boston’s Rose Kennedy Greenway, and Liz will create an interactive community ping pong court at the Boston Center for the Arts.

Nona Hershey, along with artists including Linda Bond and Joel Janowitz, is exhibiting in The Cloud in the Paper at The Schoolhouse Gallery in Provincetown (thru 7/16).

Ellen Lebow and Julie Levesque join Michael Snograss for an exhibition at Rice Polak Gallery in Provincetown (7/16-7/30, opening reception 7/18, 7 PM). Later in July, Joshua Meyer and Dawn Southworth join Lizbeth Firmin for an exhibition (7/31-8/13, opening reception 8/1, 7 PM).

Sophia Ainslie is now represented by Gallery NAGA.

Linda Mieko Allen has a solo show, Figmenta, at Nancy Hoffman Gallery in NYC (thru 7/31).

Denise Bergman published a new book, A Woman in Pieces Crossed a Sea, from West End Press.

Sarah Braman was profiled in The Believer Magazine.

Timothy Coleman‘s Birdseye Maple Desk is in the New Hampshire Furniture Masters Annual Exhibit (multiple locations July-October).

Beth Galston has a large-scale permanent public artwork, Prairie Grass, at the Northwest Service Center in San Antonio, TX. Recent, current, or upcoming exhibitions include the Middlesex School Wood Gallery in Concord (March-May), Suffolk University Art Gallery (June-August), and Peabody Essex Museum (opening September).

Congratulations to Eric Gottesman who, with Daniel Debebe Negatu, received a LEF Foundation Moving Image Fund Pre-Production Grant for his Oromaye project.

There’s a fascinating profile of Elizabeth Graver in The Boston Globe.

Sarah Stewart Johnson‘s O-Rings was selected for the Best Science and Nature Writing 2014 anthology.

Congratulations to Ann Kim, who won a Chicken and Egg Follow-up Grant.

Justin Kimball has a solo photography show, Where We Find Ourselves at Carroll and Sons Gallery (thru 9/6).

Brian Knep‘s generative art installation Chunky Frog Time is now at the Boston Harbor Islands Welcome Center located on the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway. The installation, commissioned by Boston Cyberarts, features an animation of a frog morphing through its life cycles and swimming against an ever-changing landscape and can be experienced after sunset.

Niho Kozuru has a piece in the group show Recently Acquired at The Art Complex Museum in Duxbury, MA (thru 9/7). Also, her sculptural beeswax candles are now available at Room 68 in Provincetown.

Jesse Kreitzer is holding a series of events screening his short films in an effort to raise funds for his film-in-progress Black Canaries. The films will screen in Newton and Cambridge, as well as venues in Vermont and Iowa. Also, his film Lomax about folklorist Alan Lomax’s 1941 journey through the Mississippi Delta has been an official selection at film festivals across the country and just had its international premiere at the Biografilm Festival in Bologna, Italy. Upcoming screenings include the Woods Hole Film Festival (7/26), and the Museum of the Moving Image in NYC (8/8).

Scott Listfield co-curated and has work in the exhibition Lost Moment at Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco (thru 7/19). He is profiled by FLUX.Boston founder Elizabeth Devlin in the June issue of Juxtapoz.

Rania Matar is in the exhibition The Middle East Revealed: A Female Perspective at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York (thru 8/29). Read about the exhibition in the Huffington Post.

Caitlin McCarthy will discuss her film Wonder Drug, her DES activism, and other topics on the WNTN talk show REEL TALK with The Hollywood Kid. Also, The Worcester Telegram & Gazette ran an article about her recent award from the Massachusetts Teachers Association.

Anne Neely has collaborated with sound artist Halsey Burgund to create Water Stories: Conversations in Paint and Sound, at the Museum of Science. The exhibit, an exploration into water’s unifying role in our world and the many ways humans affect it, will be on view until January 2015. Read about the project in The Boston Globe.

Masha Obolensky‘s The Bluebeard Project (created with Melia Bensussen) will have a public reading as part of the Huntington Theatre’s Summer Workshop, on 7/20, 1:30 PM.

Robert Oppenheim is in a show called Manufactured by Hand at Miller Yezerski Gallery (thru 8/15).

Congratulations to James Rutenbeck who, with Diana Fischer, received a LEF Foundation Moving Image Fund Pre-Production Grant for The Clemente Project.

Janet Rickus has a solo show at Quidley and Co. in Nantucket.

Evelyn Rydz, whose solo exhibition Forever Yours is at MFA Boston thru 9/14, will give a talk and exhibition tour on 7/17, 1 PM, with curator Al Miner.

Work by Sarah Slifer Swift is part of the Summer dance performances at Windhover in Rockport (7/18-7/20).

Joe Wardwell‘s solo show at LaMontagne Gallery received a glowing review in The Boston Globe.

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

A Rare Insight

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Every story suggests a larger narrative. Even complete in its own right, it can serve as a tile within a larger mosaic, or a window overlooking a vaster experience. Photographer and filmmaker Michaela O’Brien encountered two girls with the rare skin disease Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB), and her investigations of their story led to the documentary In Crystal Skin, as well as a larger conversation of the way society addresses (or doesn’t, as the case may be) rare diseases.

The film is currently raising post-production funds on IndieGoGo, and we asked Michaela about her project and the larger story it illuminates.

What inspired the In Crystal Skin project?
I first visited a Colombian orphanage in 2011 as a documentary photographer. It was here I met Nixa and her older sister Nury, both of whom were born with EB and continue to struggle with this disease. The sisters wrap their limbs in plastic to minimize damage to their raw and fragile skin. Life with EB has proved isolating; the sisters draw stares on the streets of Bogotá, whether on their way to a medical appointment, or just out for a walk. Despite their challenges, the sisters are a feisty, resilient pair who fervently yearn for independence.

Inspired, I began an impromptu shoot, and upon my return to the U.S., shared the footage with editor Melissa Langer. Convinced of the story’s power, we embarked on the first of four return trips to Bogotá, scraped together with personal funds and vacation time. Over the course of the next three years, we uncovered a larger EB community, colored by different people and perspectives, yet united by a common struggle and setting. In Crystal Skin reflects this process of organic discovery, following four characters along their individual yet interwoven paths which combine in a universally resonant story of courage in the face of great odds.

14262568556_6079cc846c_z

14099306299_a8fd7947af_z

How does this film relate to the larger dialogue about rare diseases of all kinds?
This documentary will be a window into the untold story of a tireless network of individuals, parents, and doctors battling an orphan disease. Our film unearths the personal experiences of spirited individuals to create a portrait of just one of the world’s 7,000 rare diseases. These rare diseases affect 1 in 10 Americans and over 350 million people worldwide.

From the tight-knit neighborhoods of Bogotá to the bustling biotech firms of Boston, the struggle to understand rare diseases and how they affect our lives and our families reaches across continents to form a global community. In Crystal Skin ignites dialogue about managing life with a rare disease and reveals those at the forefront of developing life-saving therapies for EB.

Our IndieGoGo campaign is a chance to be a part of that dialogue and to be a part of a larger effort to bring these stories to light. Our donors’ generosity will help finish this documentary and in turn will help bring the experiences of people living with rare diseases out of anonymity.

Why are you choosing to crowdfund the project?
Creating In Crystal Skin has been an act of dedication and perseverance. What inspired us to create this film in the first place – the voices and stories of those living with a rare disease – is what drives us to complete a documentary which will reach a wide audience. We are turning to Indiegogo first to raise money to complete a film which deserves to be shared, but also to establish a relationship with the many individuals experiencing life with a rare disease and those involved with patient advocacy, EB & rare disease research.

The In Crystal Skin IndieGoGo campaign is raising funds through 7/1/14.

Michaela O’Brien is a filmmaker, producer, and photographer based in Boston, MA. When she is not behind the camera, she works as an Associate Producer at Northern Light Productions located in Allston, MA.

Images: all photos by Michaela O’Brien: Melissa Langer places lav mic on interview subject, Maria Alejandra; cribs in an orphanage, Bogota, Colombia; Miguel watches the city pass him by as he rides the Transmilenio to work.

Global Trot

Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Just because.

Proving the point that dancing is awesome, Bebe Miller has choreographed a short global dance. The project asked 50 filmmakers from around the world to teach Bebe Miller’s dance to an ‘everyday’ person (watch for Hadley, MA at 1:14, Boston at 1:27, Cambridge at 1:29, and Winchenden at 1:41).

YouTube Preview Image

What Technology Trends Are Impacting Your Discipline?

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Roughly once a month, we pose questions to artists about their work and lives. We recently asked a group of artists, What technological trends are having the greatest impact on art in your discipline (for better or for worse)?

TimothyKadishExhibitExhibit

Timothy Kadish, visual artist
The Pixel. Digital photography and related technologies are having a profound effect on the 2 dimensional visual arts. I am referring to accessibility. The ability to readily adjust, manipulate, morph, and break down an image is affecting how the visual artist interacts with the formal and conceptual properties of a picture. Pixels are the “Legos” of our visual worlds and anyone can play.

Daniel Kornrumpf, fiber artist and painter
Using images that I’ve sourced from online profiles, I make embroidered portraits by hand stitching and overlapping different colored threads to create the illusion of form as well as a visceral, painterly texture. There are computer programs now that can use sophisticated sewing machines to create intricate, multi colored, embroidered images. You may have seen an example recently if you’ve been in a store that develops photos. They’ll have a blanket hanging on the wall, stitched with an image, typically a family portrait as a relatively inexpensive product, allowing you to create a blanket or pillow that can be stitched to include any image you want. There is a certain kitschy aesthetic to them but it is clear they are not made by hand. This is not a new “problem” for artists. The industrial revolution made is a lot easier and more affordable to make a lot of products from furniture to clothing, but there are still craftsman and designers today that make handmade, one of kind pieces. I believe it to be a more productive mindset to think of innovation as new opportunities and not as competition or hindrances.

AmyArchambaultSuspensionsA

Amy Archambault, installation artist
As an installation artist and sculptor, my work embodies the physical. It is an extension of my body and the space that I inhabit. I am interested in raw materials that fuse together the visual language of architecture and the physicality of athletic culture. Current trends in technology have influenced my field as some artists now employ diverse forms of new media into a given structural form. My work has utilized these tools minimally while striving to retain a raw and direct format. Suspensions (2011) explores the activation of multiple spaces that were void of human intervention. Each performance or survey of a given structure was documented using a Go-Pro HERO camera. This form of documentation yielded a raw “home-made” quality that could be shifted between surveillance and directly attached to the subject. I have continued to use this approach in more recent work. While new media continues to expand into the realm of installation, I am still most concerned with the materials themselves and their physical properties. My work takes me back to my childhood and what it is like to “touch” something for the first time. It allows the viewer to have a haptic experience and consider all the properties before them; color, texture, form, scale, dimension. Beyond the integration of video, sound (new media), installation art, I believe, will continue to be driven by physical experience.

Shane Savage-Rumbaugh, visual artist and animator
Today virtually anyone can affordably create animations. Photoshop lets artists try design permutations with unprecedented efficacy. Robotics, drawing programs, 3-d modeling tools, and Maker Bots promise a world of seamless, effortless craft. Material can be digitized and reworked. Screen glitches and pixilation are part of visual parlance, and high-tech terminology has permeated speech. Information is immediate and super abundant.

This is good because ideas find fresh embodiment and can be shared globally in real time. Inspired artists with insight, energy, and grit see technological leaps as new challenges, and as opportunities for surprises. Such individuals aren’t common, however. I think it’s a problem when people are convinced by the power of machines that making interesting art is easier than it inevitably turns out to be.

As an artist and as a teacher, I’ve tried to cultivate fluency in simple, ancient tools (charcoal, ink) believing that this enables one to more creatively exploit complex, new tools. It’s analogous to conditioning for athletes. This strategy has been succeeding, and I make animations with digital photographs of my drawings. New media has made this possible, and thus stretched me artistically.

That said, until we’re transformed by bionics, Nano-technology, and the omniscient connectivity of the Internet into something we no longer recognize as us – I’ll put faith in a need for the primal urgency of art wrought plainly by our own hands, bodies, and voices.
 
Installation artist Amy Archambault had a solo exhibition, Live-work, at 17 Cox Gallery this Winter. Watch a stop motion animation of the exhibition installation.

Timothy Kadish is exhibiting visual art in a dual show with Warner Friedman at Clark Gallery in Lincoln, MA (6/10-7/12, opening reception 6/14, 4-6 PM).

Daniel Kornrumpf is a fiber artist and painter.

Animator and visual artist Shane Savage-Rumbaugh will be doing a residency at The IdeaX factory in Springfield MO this summer.

Fellows Notes – Jun 14

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

It’s June! Paper plate holders, baked bean mounds, and “picnic” (as a verb) are all emerging from their winter slumbers. Here are this sun-shiny month’s news and notes from MCC awardees.

At Gallery NAGA, Sophia Ainslie, Masako Kamiya, David Moore, and Randal Thurston join John Guthrie in the exhibition On the Wall, and Harold Reddicliffe has work in the group show Color Ways. Both shows run 6/6-7/11, opening reception 6/6, 6-8 PM.

Ben Berman, Marsha Pomerantz, and Anna Ross join Beth Woodcome Platow and Jacob Strautmann for a reading to celebrate the spring/summer issue of Salamander at Boston Playwrights Theatre (6/18, 7 PM).

A recent Off the Radar slideshow at Time.com features work by past MCC photography awardees Judith Black (1999), Cathy Griffin (1984), Sheron Rupp (1987), and Sage Sohier (1979).

Warner Friedman and Timothy Kadish are in a dual show at Clark Gallery in Lincoln (6/10-7/12).

Alexandra Anthony‘s documentary Lost in the Bewilderness will screen at the Ismailia International Film Festival in Egypt (6/4), followed by its U.S. premiere at the Los Angeles Greek Film Festival (6/7).

Steven Barkhimer is on a winning streak with his play Windowmen. Recent winner of an IRNE award, it also won a Norton Award in May 2014.

David Binder is using Kickstarter to raise funds for another installment in his Calling My Children Project.

Alice Bouvrie is crowdfunding to support her next documentary, about an MIT geologist and the complexities of gender identity.

Congratulations to Alissa Cardone, who was recently awarded a development grant by the National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts.

Cynthia Consentino has a solo show, Reconfigurations, at A.P.E. Gallery in Northampton, thru 6/29.

Jay Critchley had a staged reading, accompanied by a 9-piece orchestra, of his musical theater work Planet Snowvio, at UC Berkeley Art Museum (CA), in May.

Mary Jane Doherty‘s documentary Secundaria screens at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston (6/18, 7:30 PM). A recent screening in San Francisco was written about in the Huffington Post.

Congratulations to Amy Dryansky, who won a Massachusetts Book Award for her poetry collection Grass Whistle.

Congratulations to Xujun Eberlein, whose essay “Clouds and Rain over Three Gorges” won American Literary Review’s nonfiction contest.

Steve Edwards published an essay, One Giant Cliché, in The Rumpus.

Georgie Friedman has work in the exhibition Water, Water Everywhere: Paean to a Vanishing Resource at the El Paso Museum of Art (6/1-8/24). She recently gave the talk Capturing Weather in Video and Installation at the Boston Cyberarts Gallery.

In May, Jane Gillooly‘s nonfiction film Suitcase of Love and Shame screened at Festival EDOC in Quito, Ecuador and at DOCAVIV in Israel.

Raul Gonzalez III is featured, along with Elaine Bay, in New American Paintings.

A sonnet by Holly Guran along with a photo by Philip McAlary are published together in the online journal Postcard Poems and Prose.

Laura Harrington‘s musical version of her novel Alice Bliss will have a workshop at Playwrights Horizons in NYC in June.

Santiago Hernandez was awarded a 2014 Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed Foundation Grant by The Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM). Recipients are awarded an unrestricted grant to support their work in painting and an exhibition in fall 2014 at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum.

Joel Janowitz is presenting a watercolor workshop at the Fine Art Work Center in Provincetown (6/29-7/4) and a monotype workshop at MIXIT Studio in Somerville (7/19-7/22). Later this summer, he has a solo exhibition at gWatson Gallery in Stonington, Maine (8/1-8/23).

Congratulations to Ann Kim, who won a Moving Image Fund Grant from the LEF Foundation.

Scott Listfield co-curated and has work in the exhibition Lost Moment at Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco (6/28-7/19, opening reception 6/28 7-10 PM). He is profiled by FLUX.Boston founder Elizabeth Devlin in the June issue of Juxtapoz.

Holly Lynton has a solo exhibition, Holly Lynton: Pioneer Valley at the Miller Yezerski Gallery (5/23-7/1, opening reception 6/6).

In May, Michael Mack performed his one-man-show at Virginia Theological Seminary, the largest accredited Episcopal Seminary in the world. The Washington Post covered the event with a Metro Section feature story.

Rania Matar has photography in group exhibitions in Bangkok (Thailand) and Sharjah (United Arab Emirates). Her solo show Ordinary Lives is on view at The Arab American National Museum in Detroit (thru 8/31).

Caitlin McCarthy has been honored by the Massachusetts Teachers Association with a Human and Civil Rights Award for her activism around DES awareness.

Mary Bucci McCoy and her work were featured on the 365 Artists 365 Days blog.

Vanessa Michalak has a solo show, Everything I Ever Wanted at FOLK Gallery in Kittery, Maine (opening reception 6/6, 5-8 PM).

Nathalie Miebach has work in the exhibition Synergy: Ocean Stories at the New Bedford Art Museum (6/27-9/12).

Liz Nofziger will be in residence at the Boston Center for the Arts this Summer to make BOUNCE, an amplified overgrown ping-pong table to play around the clock on the plaza.

Monica Raymond‘s mini-eco-opera Paper or Plastic (for which she wrote the libretto) is being featured on Atlanta Fringe Audio Festival (thru 6/8). She has visual art in Raise the Roof, an art show of faculty and students of the Cambridge Center for Adult Education (thru 6/6). Finally, she’s been selected to participate in the Composer/Librettist Workshop sponsored by Nautilus Music Theater in St. Paul Minnesota (5/24-6/9) and two of her short music theater pieces will be performed as part of the theater’s Rough Cuts series (6/9-6/10).

Evelyn Rydz‘s solo exhibition at MFA Boston (thru 11/14) is featured in Temporary Land Bridge.

Mitch Ryerson was recently was awarded the Spirit Award from the Maude Morgan Art Center in Cambridge.

Peter Snoad‘s play Orbiting Mars will receive a third staged reading on June 7 – this time by Reston Community Players in Herndon, VA as part of its New Play Project. A spoof on militarism and celebrity culture, the play tells the story of a community theater company’s desperate attempt to win a statewide contest by casting the Roman God, Mars, as the lead in a Noel Coward comedy.

Tracy Heather Strain and Randall MacLowry have launched a Kickstarter campaign to support their Lorraine Hansberry Documentary Project, running through 6/20.

Congratulations to Grace Talusan, who won the 2014 Dorothy O’Connor Award from the Boston Chapter of the Women’s National Book Association. She’ll read from her winning essay, “Angelina Jolie (and I) Will Have Another Preventive Surgery,” at Newtonville Books (6/4, 6:30 PM).

Joe Wardwell has a solo show, Party Over, at LaMontagne Gallery in Boston (thru 7/19).

Debra Weisberg gave a talk at MIT’s Department of Architecture in March, as part of the Spring 2014 Computation Lecture Series. She’ll be giving a shortened version of this talk at the Computational Making Workshop of the Sixth International Conference on Design Computing and Cognition (6/21) at University College London.

Elizabeth Whyte Schulze was in the show Considering The Kylix at Peter’s Valley Craft Center Gallery in April and May. She’ll be showing at Marywood University in Scranton, PA in September.

Michael Zelehoski is now represented by the Michael Weiss Gallery. He’s created a site specific installation at the Gallery to coincide with the exhibition Suckerpunch by Joe Fleming.

One of our favorite Fellows Notes of all time: Evan Ziporyn and the “Bang on a Can” group that he co-founded appear in an episode of Arthur! (He’s the clarinet-playing dog.)

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: Nathalie Miebach, SOLAR BEGINNINGS (2008), Reed, wood, weather data collected on Cape Cod, 56x66x27 in.

Twanging Artist Opportunities

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

Chuck_Berry__public_doman_

ArtSake’s plugged in and rocking out.

Photographers Entries are now being accepted for StoneCrop Gallery’s Cell Phone Photos exhibit. Learn more.
Deadline: May 16, 2014

Call for Artists Entries are now being accepted for  See the Light: A National Juried Exhibition at the Attleboro Arts Museum. Open to all mediums, sizes and concepts that explore light both as a tool for emphasis, and as medium. Learn more.
Deadline: May 20, 2014

Women Artists Entries are now being accepted for the 11th A.I.R. Gallery Biennial,  a juried exhibition. All women artists, including self-identified women, may submit original works of art in all media, including painting, photography, prints, drawing, works on paper, new media, sculpture, mixed media, traditional or non-traditional materials.  Juror: Nancy Princenthal: Critic, former Senior Editor of Art in America, NYC. There is no size limit on artwork. Learn more.
Deadline: May 30, 2014

Performing Artists Grants The New England Foundation for the Arts is currently accepting applications for the New England States Touring (NEST) Grants. NEST grants provide support to New England-based nonprofit organizations (known as presenters) for performances and community activities by select New England performing artists. Learn more.
Deadline: June 2, 2014

LGBTQ Films Entries are now being accepted for the Long Beach Q Film Festival (September 12-14, 2014, Long Beach, CA) – Seeking films that embody the LGBTQ community and the values of freedom, justice, and inclusion of everyone regardless of sexual orientation or gender expression. Learn more.
Deadline: June 8, 2014

Artist, Writers Residency Fellowships The Vermont Studio Center is offering 43 fellowship awards for artists and writers, including: 25 VSC Fellowships, Pollock-Krasner Foundation Fellowships, VSC/Joan Mitchell Foundation Fellowships, and 1 Grace Paley Fiction Fellowship. Read more for a complete list of fellowships and eligibility requirements.
Deadline: June 15th, 2014

Playwrights Entries are now being accepted for The Firehouse Center for the Arts’ New Works Festival 2015. They are seeking original plays from New England. The 2015 New Works Festival will showcase 10 minute, one-act, and full-length plays. Learn more.
Deadline: June 29, 2014

Call for Proposals New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA) invites you to propose a hybrid net art project for Turbulence.org – Augment it Yourself (AiY). Projects must use both the World Wide Web and a physical site. Commission Amount: $6,000.  Augmented Reality (AR) is a real-time experience of a real-world environment whose elements are augmented by computer-generated sensory input — such as video, graphics or sound — and mapped to GPS coordinates. Thus, after downloading an AR ‘app’ to a smartphone and going to the specified location, users are able to experience intertwined realities. While AR refers to the technologies that make these experiences possible, we are interested in how we have always augmented our realities — with our brains and other reality-mediating technologies — modifying and/or enhancing reality by layering memories on real-time perceptions, for instance. How will your project contribute to perception, memory, and the creation of the autobiographical self? Required: Proposal (max 500 words), Biography (max 300 words), and URLS of past work. Email to turbulence@turbulence.org with the Subject: Turbulence.org – AiY Proposal.
Deadline: July 1, 2014 

Photographers Entries are now being accepted for En Foco’s New Work Photography Fellowship Awards for U.S.-based photographers of Latino, African or Asian heritage, and Native Peoples of the Americas and the Pacific. Learn more.
Deadline: July 7, 2014

Women of Color Filmmakers  Entries are now being accepted for the Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival and Lecture Series (October 25-26, 2014, New York, NY), organized by African Voices and Long Island University’s Media Arts Dept. Entries must be directed, produced, or written by a woman or women of color, and will be accepted in the following categories: Women Film, Documentary, Narrative, Experimental, African Film, and India Film. Learn more.
Deadline: June 9, 2014

Image credit: Image of the great rock & roll innovator Chuck Berry. Photograph from the public domain. 

Self in Art

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Roughly once a month, we pose questions to artists about their work and lives. We recently asked a group of artists, How much of the “self” is in your art?

At what remove do you keep yourself (as a participant/subject), your experiences and memories, and/or your closely-held beliefs from your art?

Part two of a two-part discussion.

Alicia Savage, photographer
As a self-portrait photographer, my work is very much self-reflective and a source of how I process and document my experiences. But as an artist and human being I also recognize that many of the emotions and experiences that I am expressing through my images are universal – self-discovery, hesitations, curiosity, etc. My images reflect these internal focuses while refraining from exposing specific details in order to allow others to apply their own experiences and interpretations of it – emphasizing the core elements that I feel and hope we can all relate to.

Shaykha

Zachary Stuart, documentary filmmaker
As a documentary filmmaker, this is always a big question I ask myself. Most of the work I’ve done has focused on the personal, telling a story about myself or my ancestors. But anytime I decide I want to show something in a documentary frame, I must have a level of interest in it that reflects something of myself. My production partner Kelly Thomson and I have always been seekers of the truth, whether it be through social justice, introspection or education. The last film we made together was about my great-grandfather, a very important early anthropologist. This was incredibly personal for me. Yet it was a struggle to write my own voice and convey my thoughts because I was torn between having some level of objectivity about my ancestor as an historical figure and my personal connection to him. This is where Kelly as a co-director was very important. However at a certain point in the process, her personal investment in the ideas of the film became just as caught up in the material as my familial connection to the characters. Now we have begun a new project about Muslim women, a topic closer to Kelly’s interest and something I felt I would be quite distant from. But as we’ve entered the world of our subjects, mystical women who tell us that destroying the self is what leads to revealing truth, I’ve become just as caught up in their experiences, and have myself been transformed despite the distance the camera brings…

Kay Ruane, visual artist
Before starting a series of drawings, I often take a run through the woods and open myself with all of my senses to the world. It becomes a synesthetic experience. My sense of self merges completely with the world around me. This interaction and communication triggers images. Sometimes I collect objects that reflect those images. I begin to sense the coming drawings, as if they’ve already been completed and it’s my task to go back in time to make this future vision concrete.

Next is usually a photo shoot. If it’s a self-portrait, I surround myself with some of the objects. As my husband photographs me, he enters the work as I am seen through his eyes. I become and feel more like a subject, like one of the objects I’ve gathered.

As I draw, I often find myself merging with the drawing, as if there are no boundaries between it and myself. Yet at the same time, the figure becomes someone else. I have a sense of a personality, but it doesn’t seem to be me. As the drawing becomes more concrete and detailed, my “self” becomes more defuse, a surrogate for every self.

One question my work may be trying to answer is: How much of one’s self is the world and how much of the world is in one’s self.

Tara Nelson, film & video artist
Separating myself from my artwork has never occurred to me. Perhaps this comes from many years of being my own (and often – only) audience, when I used art to reveal something about myself, to myself. I am always responding to my own life through my artwork, and I try to surprise myself as much as possible. Conclusions are the enemy! I try to leave the door to the imagination wide open, to give myself a way back in when I return to the work as time goes on.

On the other hand, I believe that my films must be allowed to live their own lives. They have to be free to succeed or fail on their own, to travel the world and (in the case of my Super 8 films) pick up a few scars that will change them forever. My artwork – like myself – must be vulnerable to be interesting.

Tara Nelson is an award-winning film & video artist. Her work is in the group exhibition Psychic Panic at SPACE Gallery in Pittsburgh, May 16-June 29.

Kay Ruane is a visual artist who lives and works in Cambridge, MA. Her work has been shown in galleries and museums around the country, including the Miller Block Gallery (now Miller Yezerski Gallery) in Boston MA, the Jenkins Johnson Gallery in San Francisco CA, and the deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum in Lincoln MA.

Alicia Savage is a photographer whose work is currently exhibiting in Fall Back, Spring Forward at the Photographic Resource Center in Boston (through May 17), part of the Flash Forward Festival.

Zachary Stuart is co-founder, with Kelly Thomson, of the film company Sly Productions. Watch the trailer for their new piece on Vimeo.

Images: Alicia Savage, HEAD IN THE CLOUDS (2012); still image from the film-in-progress SHAYKHA by Zachary Stuart and Kelly Thomson; Kay Ruane, EAT (2013), graphite and gouache on paper, 11.25×11 in; still image from the video installation SUKHA/DUKKHA (Comfort and Sorrow) by Tara Nelson.

Calling My Children at Boston Public Library, 5/7

Thursday, April 17th, 2014
YouTube Preview Image

We’re happy to share that a screening of Calling My Children (watch an excerpt, above), a documentary film by David Binder (Film & Video Fellow ’11) about a Boston-area family devastated by AIDS, is taking place at the Boston Public Library‘s Rabb Lecture Hall on May 7, 2014, 6-8 PM.

The event celebrates a special broadcast of the documentary on PBS in May and will include a conversation with and photo exhibition by David, as well as a special recognition from the office of Gov. Deval Patrick.

Learn more (PDF).

Fellows Notes – Apr 14

Monday, March 31st, 2014

No foolin’! Here’s the April news & notes from past MCC fellows/finalists.

Three MCC awardees are showing films in the 2014 Boston Cinema Census at the Brattle Theatre (4/10, 8 PM): Kimberly Forero-Arnias (Hay Algo Y Se Va), Cristina Kotz Cornejo (Buena Fe), and Robert Todd (LOVESONG).

Elizabeth Alexander has a solo show, Mary Mary, at Jane Deering Gallery in Santa Barbara, CA (thru 4/26).

Alexandra Anthony‘s documentary film Lost in the Bewilderness was part of the 16th Thessaloniki Documentary Festival.

Rick Ashley‘s photography is included in Fall Back, Spring Forward: Photography in New England, curated by Francie Weiss, as part of the Flash Forward Festival Boston in May. The exhibition is at the Photographic Resource Center and runs 4/29-5/17, opening reception 5/1, 6-9 PM.

Steven Barkhimer‘s play Windowmen was produced in Oct/Nov at Boston Playwrights Theatre and is receiving a David Mark Cohen award at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival for Best Play. The production has been nominated for 5 local awards by the Independent Reviewers of New England (ceremony 4/7), including Best New Play of 2013 and Best Play of 2013.

Ben Berman will read poetry as part of the Mr. Hip Presents Reading Series at UFORGE Gallery in Jamaica Plain (4/26, 6-8:30), along with Gail Mazur, Jamaal May, LaTasha Diggs, Zachary Bos, Marie-Elizabeth Mali, Jason Rotstein, and Amber Rose Johnson. He’ll also be taking part in the Massachusetts Poetry Festival (5/2-5/4) in Salem, MA, and was shortlisted for a Mass Book Award for his poetry collection Strange Borderlands.

Rebecca Doughty is exhibiting in a two-person show, Rarefied at the Simmons College Trustman Gallery (4/22-5/30, reception & artist talk 4/30, 5-7 PM).

Holly Guran will have two poems displayed at Boston City Hall as part of a project by The Mayor’s Prose & Poetry Program focusing on the Boston Marathon bombing.

Robbie Heidinger has a solo exhibition, Ceramic Installation by Robbie Heidinger at the Williston Northampton School Grubb Gallery (thru 5/11, artist talk & demonstration 5/7, 1 PM).

Cathy Jacobowitz will give a talk, titled “How I Set Out to Write About the Revolution, and How It Changed Me,” at the Lucy Parsons Center in Jamaica Plain on 5/3, 3 PM. She’ll read from and sign copies of her recent novel, The One-Way Rain.

Lisa Kessler‘s solo show In the Pink will exhibit at Danforth Art 4/6-6/15. An artist talk and reception takes place 4/6, 4 PM.

Fred H.C. Liang has a solo show, Ripples Beyond Singularity, at Carroll and Sons Gallery in Boston, 4/2-5/31, reception 4/4 5:30-7:30 PM.

Scott Listfield is exhibiting in a three person show, Face. Space. Place. at Visionspace Gallery in Lynn (opening 4/12, 6 PM), and he’ll be participating in the Somerville Open Studios (5/3-5/4). Elsewhere in the country, he’s part of two San Francisco group shows, UNIVERSE at Modern Eden Gallery (4/12-5/3) and Space//Squared at White Walls Gallery (5/10-6/7), and is featured in two exhibitions from Gallery 1988 in L.A., the 10th anniversary exhibition (4/11-4/26), and the traveling Ghostbusters 30th Anniversary Art Show. Finally, he’s updated his Web site and recently began selling two prints through The People’s Printshop.

Melinda Lopez‘s new play Becoming Cuba is being produced by the Huntington Theatre Campany at the Calderwood Pavilion/BCA, thru 5/3.

Congratulations to Matthew Mazzotta, whose public art project Open House won a Architizer A+ Award (Jury Award for Architecture + Urban Transformation).

Mary Bucci McCoy has a solo exhibition at Kingston Gallery, 4/2-4/27, reception 4/4, 5:30-8 PM.

Nathalie Miebach (along with Jane Marsching and Marina Mangubi) is exhibiting in The Observant Eye at the Wheaton College Beard and Weil Gallery (thru 4/16). She has a solo show of new and older work at the Cotuit Center for the Arts, That Link Between Ocean and Land thru 5/4. Her work can be seen at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Airport (T North Concourse) in Flight Pattern thru April 2015. She recently finished a residency at the Oxbow School in Napa, CA and is speaking at the at the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University on 4/10 as part of their lecture series “Polar Perspectives on Art and Science.”

Monica Raymond‘s monologue play, Martina’s Story, was performed as part of She Speaks, a festival of women’s monologues, in Kitchener, Ontario (3/29). Monica also has photographs in a group show at the Cambridge Community Television offices, showing thru 4/17.

Nick Rodrigues is among the artists in the exhibition The Departed at The Distillery Gallery in South Boston, thru 4/7.

Evelyn Rydz will have a solo exhibition, Evelyn Rydz: Forever Yours at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston 4/19-9/14. New works for the exhibition were created as part of a Hawaii residency when Evelyn was awarded the prestigious Traveling Fellowship from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, in 2012.

Congratulations to Karen Skolfield, whose poetry collection Frost in the Low Areas won a 2014 PEN/New England Award.

Congratulations to Tracy Heather Strain and Randall MacLowry, whose Lorraine Hansberry Documentary Project received a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Later this month, the project will launch a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign.

Deb Todd Wheeler‘s collaborative project Chromatic Energy Mirror is part of the exhibition Surge at Babson College’s Hollister Gallery (thru 5/20).

Read past Fellows Notes. If you’re a past fellow/finalist with news, let us know.

Image: still image from LOST IN THE BEWILDERNESS, a documentary film by Alexandra Anthony.