Archive for the ‘arts business’ Category

Historic Artist Opportunities

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

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Of Note: The National Museum of African American History & Culture has opened in Washington DC.

Poets Entries are now being accepted for the New Criterion’s Poetry Prize of $3,000 and publication by St. Augustine’s Press. The prize is given annually for a poetry collection that pays close attention to form. Erica Dawson, Roger Kimball, and David Yezzi will judge. Submit a manuscript of up to 60 pages with a $25 entry fee byVisit the website for complete guidelines. Learn more.
Deadline:  September 30, 2016

Artist Business Grants MASS MoCA’s Assets for Artists program is seeking Boston-based applicants for its Matched Savings Program, which supports creative entrepreneurs with a matching grant and artist-focused business and financial training. Eligible applicants must have a home or studio address in the City of Boston. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Poets, Fiction Writers Entries are currently being accepted for the University of Massachusetts Press Juniper Prizes. Four prizes of $1,000 each and publication by University of Massachusetts Press are given annually for a first poetry collection, a poetry collection, a short story collection, and a novel or novella. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

Short Fiction Entries are now being accepted for the University of Iowa Press Short Fiction Awards. Two awards of publication by University of Iowa Press are given annually for first collections of short fiction. Writers who have not published a book of fiction are eligible. Learn more.
Deadline: September 30, 2016

MCC Artist Fellowships The Massachusetts Cultural Council is currently accepting Artist Fellowship applications for Crafts, Dramatic Writing, and Sculpture/Installation/New Genres. Artist Fellowships are unrestricted, anonymously judged grants for Massachusetts artists in recognition of artistic excellence. Fellowship awards are currently $12,000. Finalist awards are $1,000. Learn more.
Deadline: Monday, October 3, 2016

STARS Residencies The Massachusetts Cultural Council’s STARS Residencies Program (Students and Teachers Working with Artists, Scientists, and Scholars) provides grants of $500-$5,000 to schools to support creative learning residencies of three days or more in the arts, sciences, and humanities. Learn more.
Application opens October 6, 2016 at 4pm

Videos, Animations, Computer Generated Work Proposals for the next round of Art on the Marquee are currently being accepted. Looking for work 30 second videos, animations or computer generated work, that use the entire Marquee in creative ways. Please submit a storyboard, statement, work samples, and CV to info@bostoncyberarts.org The call is limited to artists who live anywhere in the state of Massachusetts. Learn more.
Deadline: October 16th, 2016 (midnight)

Boston Choreographers The Boston Foundation and The Aliad Fund have announced Next Steps for Boston Dance, a new grant program that provides multi-layered support for Boston-area choreographers creating original work in any genre. Offers 250 hours of rehearsal space; 6-10 consultations with experts in chosen areas of need/interest; $5,000 in implementation funds for the artist to take a “next step” in his/her work or career; a series of cohort meetings to connect choreographers, build relationships, and allow for co-learning. A minimum of three grants will be awarded in this pilot round/first year of Next Steps. Learn more.
Deadline: Oct 24, 2016 at 5pm

Ten-minute Plays Submissions of ten-minute plays by New England playwrights are now being accepted for the Boston Theater Marathon XIX to be held May 14, 2017, at the Stanford Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts. Learn more.
Deadline: November 15, 2016

Writing Conference Scholarships If you’re interested in attending Muse and the Marketplace, GrubStreet’s national conference for writers, in Boston Spring 2017 but could use financial support, GrubStreet is offering numerous $250 scholarships for attendees. Learn more.
Deadline: November 21, 2016

Image credit: Circa 1940s: “Miss America.” (Joe Schwartz). From the photography collection of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

How Do You Approach the Business of Art?

Friday, April 1st, 2016

Periodically, we pose a question to artists about an issue they face in their work and lives.

It can be challenging to balance artistic creation with the business, financial, or other career aspects of artists’ work. Artists are encouraged to see their art career as a “business” – but how does that translate into practice? We asked artists in different disciplines, What is your approach to the business of art, and how has it changed over time?

Part two of a two-part discussion.

Jake Fried, animator
Ultimately, my experimental animations must transcend financial concerns, otherwise they become something else for someone else. Luckily, making deeply personal work that I believe in has increasingly led to new and rewarding paid opportunities.

My main source of income is teaching, mostly at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. This past year I have created commissioned work for Adult Swim and the Marionette Record label, among others. I have screened my films at many international festivals, gallery shows and artist talks that provide awards and fees. And finally I’ve been awarded grants and fellowships, including one recently in Film & Video from the MCC.

As much as possible I want my artistic and financial success to stem directly from being true to my vision – it’s a hustle and I’m always chasing new opportunities to make this happen, but it’s worth it to make the work I believe in.

Jenine Shereos, LEAF (2013), human hair, 5x3 in, photo by Robert Diamante

Jenine Shereos, sculptor/installation artist
A few years ago, some of my work was featured on a popular art and design blog. I received a lot of exposure from this, and it had a ripple effect over the years as people continued to share the images on social media and other online venues. Many positive opportunities arose from this publicity, but it was definitely a learning experience as well. I had people contact me with bizarre commission requests, dealt with copyright issues, and even had an offer from Ripley’s Believe it or Not! This experience taught me the importance of being my own agent. To say no to things that don’t fit with my vision and to seek out the opportunities that I feel will enhance my career as an artist. I spend a lot of time researching residencies, grants, and other opportunities online. Recently, artist residencies have played a significant role in my artistic journey and have afforded me time away to focus on my art.

Similar to my artistic practice, I see the business aspect of my work as an organic process that continues to grow and evolve over time. I don’t know if I’ll ever be able to support myself fully from my art, but the obstacles keep me thinking creatively. Sometimes I feel frustrated by a sense of disconnection in my life, although I know I am not alone and many artists face the same struggle. On the one hand, my work has been shown internationally in museums and included in major publications. At the same time, I am nearing forty and waiting tables while piecing together odd jobs. Recently, I was sharing my frustrations with a friend and he asked if there was anyone I know personally who is making their living exclusively as an artist who I could look to as a model. After thinking through the many artists I have met over the years, I couldn’t think of a single one. I am slowly realizing that maybe this isn’t necessarily the end goal. I try to focus on the fact that I love making art and know I will always find a way to continue to do so against any odds.

Publicity photo from THE LAUNCH PRIZE, written by MJ Halberstadt, produced March 2016 at the Calderwood Pavilion of the Boston Center for the Arts, directed by Tiffany Nichole Greene, featuring Katharine Chen Lerner, Bari Robinson, John Tracey, and Angela K Thomas

MJ Halberstadt, playwright
People joke that Masters Programs in playwriting are “red headed stepchildren” that can’t be boxed neatly into more easily articulable Theatre or Creative Writing programs. Similarly, reconciling playwriting within the framework of a business model presents questions and problems. On one hand, I’m an artist-for-hire because different companies present my work. When they do, I am not the play’s “producer.” On the other hand, I am a free-lancer because I am the sole proprietor of my own playwriting “business.” The minimum viable product of what I can produce is a script, not a play, which is not sellable by itself – except, arguably, in the case of having the script published. It becomes necessary to tease apart distinctions, especially between my script and a company’s production of it. Combined, they make the product (a “play”) but assigning value to my part in it is tricky, especially when all of the theatre world is starving for monetary resources and many of the producers of my work are personal friends. I’m not a playwright for gain; in fact, only about a dozen American playwrights sustain themselves entirely off royalties. That’s why I have a totally unrelated day job at present; this is getting more and more difficult to reconcile since my playwriting “career” demands more of me each year.

[MJ takes a sip from a glass of whiskey.]

If my “brand” has “worth,” it’s not quantifiable. If anything, I’m building up artistic capital through making myself known and archiving reviews and, yes, “networking.” The hope is that it’ll pay off if and when I sell a TV pilot or get a job teaching playwriting.

[MJ takes another – longer – sip.]

 

Related reading: Who Is Your Audience? and How Do You Define Success as an Artist?

Jake Fried (inkwood.net) is an experimental animator whose work has shown on Carton Network’s Adult Swim, at the Tate Modern, in the Sundance Film Festival, and many other festivals and venues. He recently screened work in the Boston Underground Film Festival and has upcoming screenings at the Ashland Independent Film Festival, the Annecy International Animation Film Festival, and the Melbourne International Animation Festival.

MJ Halberstadt’s (mj-halberstadt.squarespace.com) new play is That Time the House Burned Down, produced by Fresh Ink Theatre at Boston Playwrights Theatre April 8-23. His play The Launch Prize was produced by Bridge Rep in Boston in March ’16 (read a great review in the Boston Globe). In February, he was profiled by Emerson College, and he wrote about race and privilege in theatre for HowlRound. In 2014, he was one of the artists selected to participate in Assets for Artists, a program supporting artists through financial and business training opportunities and matched savings.

Jenine Shereos (jenineshereos.com) is a sculptor and installation artist specializing in fiber and textile processes. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including in France, Italy, Switzerland, Poland, Portugal, Hungary, Austria, and Canada, and has been published in the Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe, The Huffington Post, Make Magazine, and and the compendium Textiles: The Art of Mankind. Her work is currently on view at Centraal Museum in Utrecht, Netherlands, and in 2017, she will have a solo show at the Hampden Gallery at UMass Amherst.

Images and Media: BRAIN LAPSE by Jake Fried; Jenine Shereos, LEAF (2013), human hair, 5×3 in, photo by Robert Diamante; publicity photo from THE LAUNCH PRIZE, written by MJ Halberstadt, produced March 2016 at the Calderwood Pavilion of the Boston Center for the Arts, directed by Tiffany Nichole Greene, featuring Katharine Chen Lerner, Bari Robinson, John Tracey, and Angela K Thomas.

How Do You Approach the Business of Art?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

Periodically, we pose a question to artists about an issue they face in their work and lives.

It can be challenging to balance artistic creation with the financial, marketing, or other career aspects of artists’ work. Artists are encouraged to see their art career as a “business” – but how does that translate into practice? We asked artists in different disciplines, What is your approach to the business of art, and how has it changed over time?

Part one of a two-part discussion.

Wall mural by Caleb Neelon in Somerville, MA (basketball court is by Maria Molteni)

Caleb Neelon, international public artist
Last year while on a mural project in Sarajevo I passed a funny milestone: first time out at some bar (legally) downing beers with people half my age. I was 38 then and the guys were 19. They were eager young graffiti writers and they were taking the chance to grill me with nerdy graffiti history questions and ask about their favorite international graffiti writers that I had met or painted with over the years. They wanted to do their own individual version of what I had done, which was to make a career out of the doors-of-possibility-blowing-open passion of my youth. And one thing that I realized, and said to them, was that while I had been in some way a professional artist since I was their age, and those 20 years feel like forever, I’m consumed with how I positively navigate the next 40, or however long fate has in store for me. In many ways, the goals for me have shifted from a list of specifics (show here, sell for this much, publish this, paint a mural there, etc) to the end goal of doing good work up to the time I’m done here on Earth.

Crystal King, novelist, writer, and marketing/communications professional
Over the last few years, I’ve taught many classes to artists and authors on how to use social media. Many of them are there to learn only because someone, usually an agent, has told them that they need to be on Facebook or Twitter. Often, they are not happy about it. Some people do their best to engage with and build their audience. Others start social accounts but let them languish a month or so after their show or their book comes out, then bemoan the fact that no one is interested in their work.

To me, the business of art is just as important as the art itself. This is a world in which anyone has the chance to be successful. But unless you’ve managed to get lucky, you have to pay or play for your art to be noticed. If you can’t pay for publicity, then you need to learn and work for it. I’m always baffled when people are unwilling to promote themselves. If you believe in the work that you do, why on earth wouldn’t you do EVERYTHING you can to help others see your vision? This is more important than ever for me, as I prepare for my own book to come out in 2017.

Mariko Kusumoto, metalworker and textile artist
My artistic choices have changed over time, and the business side has followed the creative. Metal constructions had been my main focus since 1995, but in 2013 – after completing a very involved and technically challenging metal piece – I felt the need to move away from using purely representational imagery and do something more abstract, organic, and in a different material; the result has been fabric work. Fabric is completely opposite metal, and I like the softness, gentle texture, and atmospheric quality of the fabric I use.

In a formal manner, the financial aspects of my work are completely managed by my gallery although we work in unison to establish pricing. My metal pieces are quite expensive. But in developing smaller-scale fabric pieces, I felt that a wider audience/collector would find them more accessible, both aesthetically and financially. The public exposure for this new work (e.g., print, websites) has expanded audience interest as well.

What else has changed over the course of my career are opportunities and invitations that require an increasing amount of time to attend to thus removing me from the necessary concentration needed to make my work. I am flattered and grateful for the interest, but I have to politely refuse certain requests.

Metalwork by Mariko Kusumoto: RYOUNKAKU (2007), board game, metalworks, 27x9x1-1/2 in, photo by Dean Powell
Top: metalwork by Mariko Kusumoto from 2007; bottom: Mariko’s recent textile work
Recent textile work by Mariko Kusumoto, photo courtesy of the artist and Mobilia Gallery

 

Related reading: Getting More Out of Getting Online by Jessica Burko, and What Decision Most Impacted Your Career?

Crystal King (crystalking.com) is a 20-year marketing and communications veteran who has directed global social media programs for companies such as Pegasystems (were she currently works), Keurig, CA Technologies, and Sybase. Crystal is also a writer and Pushcart-nominated poet. Her first novel, Feast of Sorrow, will be published by Touchstone Books in 2017. She has taught classes in writing, creativity, and social media at Harvard Extension School, Boston University, Mass College of Art, and UMass Boston. At Grub Street Writers’ The Muse and the Marketplace Conference (April 29-May 1), she will present workshops on electronic tools to streamline writing and self-promotion using social media.

Mariko Kusumoto (marikokusumoto.com) is a metalworker and printmaker who is now working in fiber. Her intricate metal box sculptures have exhibited at Fuller Craft Museum, Morikami Museum, Racine Art Museum, and Society for Contemporary Craft, and her fiber creations have been featured in American Craft and Fiber Art Now magazines. She is represented by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, which has a Spotlight Exhibition of her work thru April 16, 2016.

Caleb Neelon‘s (calebneelon.com) wall murals and other works have exhibited in dozens of countries and in many galleries, museums, hospitals, and educational settings. Along with his artist monograph Caleb Neelon’s Book of Awesome, he is the co-author of The History of American Graffiti, Street World, and Graffiti Brasil, among other publications. His most recent projects, the documentary film Wall Writers: Graffiti in Its Innocence and an accompanying art book from Ginko Press, are forthcoming.

Images: wall mural by Caleb Neelon in Somerville, MA (basketball court is by Maria Molteni); Mariko Kusumoto, RYOUNKAKU (2007), board game, metalworks, 27x9x1-1/2 in, photo by Dean Powell; recent textile work by Mariko Kusumoto, photo courtesy of the artist and Mobilia Gallery.

Artist Opportunities Turkey Trot

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015

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With her feathered friend guiding the way, an ArtSake staff chooses the path less traveled!

Of Note An Artist-in-Business training will be held on Saturday, January 9 – Sunday, January 10, 9:00 am – 4:30 pm at Greenfield Community College. This training is a project of the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service’s Arts Entrepreneurship Initiative in partnership with Greenfield Community College. Learn more to register.

Filmmakers Entries are being accepted for the Independent Film Festival Boston 2016 (April 27–May 4, 2016). They are considering both feature-length and short subject in narrative, documentary, animation, and experimental. Learn more.
Deadline: November 30, 2015

Poetry Entries are now being accepted for the Letterpress Poetry Chapbook Competition which includes a prize of $500, a week-long residency at the Millay Colony for the Arts, and letterpress publication by the Center for Book Arts. Submit a poetry manuscript of up to 21 pages. Learn more.
Deadline December 16, 2015

Short Plays The Florida Studio Theatre is seeking compelling short plays and sketches for inclusion in their annual New Play Festival during the spring. These scripts will be reviewed and used to develop long-term relationships with new writers for future programming. Learn more.
Deadline: December 16, 2015

Short Fiction Lascaux Review Prize in Short Fiction — A prize of $1,000 and publication in Lascaux Review is given annually for a short story of up to 10,000 words. Learn more.
Deadline: December 31, 2015

Image credit: Photograph of turkey and woman in public domain.

Hoofing for Artist Opportunities

Tuesday, November 17th, 2015

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Grants for Artists With Financial Need The Pollack Krasner Foundation is accepting applications from visual artists (painters, sculptors, and artists who work on paper, including printmakers) with genuine financial needs. Grants are intended for a one-year period of time, with the size of the grant to be determined by the artist’s individual circumstances and professional exhibition history. Artists applying for a grant must be actively exhibiting their current work in a professional artistic venue such as a gallery or museum space. Learn more.
Deadline: Ongoing

Of Note Getting By in Boston in conjunction Boston Institute for Nonprofit Journalism will host a free, public forum for artists and creative professionals of all disciplines to discuss the crisis in creative industries: expenses are only rising, but making a living is increasingly difficult. Thursday, November 19, 2015, 7-9 PM, at the Community Church of Boston. Learn more.

Flux Factory Residency Flux Factory in Queens, NY, is currently accepting applications for residencies from visual artists, builders, curators, community organizers, chefs, activists, musicians, writers. They offer professional development opportunities, including one-on-one studio visits, group field trips, and monthly salons. Includes 14 studios, a gallery, silkscreen studio, woodshop, co-working office, communal kitchen, library, and rooftop garden.  Learn more.
Deadline: November 15, 2015 (midnight)

Artist Residency The MAM16 is a 3 week residency program in Marrakech, Morocco which will occur during the Marrakech Biennale 2016 from 21 March – 10 April 2016. It will be an intercultural exchange for interdisciplinary performance and live art. All work presentation will be site specific. The theme for MAM16 is VISION TRACESLearn more.
Deadline: November 20, 2015

Playwrights Residency The Scripps Ranch Theatre’s New Works Studio is accepting applications from emerging and established playwrights for residencies to develop new work. SRT’s New Works Studio will be a group of up to five playwrights that meet twice a month to read and critique plays in progress. Over the course of nine months, writers will be offered peer review, as well as feedback from a dramaturg and other invited theatre artists, with the goal of completing a production-ready draft of their play by the end of the development period. NWS Playwrights will have an opportunity to present their completed drafts to theatre professionals in the San Diego area, as well as to general audiences, at the culmination of the residency in an as-yet-to-be-named festival reading. Learn more.
Deadline: November 30, 2015

Call for Art Creative Living Works in Somerville, MA, is currently accepting entries for a juried exhibition with cash awards to be hosted at the Washington St. Gallery. Works should challenge the traditional boundaries of art making and involve multiple mediums. Applicants are invited to submit work that crosses one or more creative disciplines. Unique and experimental art is encouraged. The collaboration of creative fields may be in the subject matter, the medium or a combination of both. Learn more.
Deadline: December 15, 2015

Artist Residency The MacDowell Colony in provides time, space, and an inspiring environment to artists of exceptional talent. A MacDowell Fellowship, or residency, consists of exclusive use of a studio, accommodations, and three prepared meals a day for up to eight weeks. There are no residency fees. Accepts applications from artists working in the following disciplines: architecture, film/video arts, interdisciplinary arts, literature, music composition, theatre, and visual arts. Learn more.
Deadline: January 15, 2016

LGBTQ Themed Plays  The Rainbow Theatre Project in Washington, D.C, seeks full length submissions which deal directly or obliquely with the LGBTQ experience. Learn more.
Deadline: Ongoing

Artist Residency The Emmanuel College Art Department offers an eight-week artists residency to four artists each summer. The residency supports a diverse group of artists, providing time and space for established and emerging artists to develop their work. However, the Art Department specifically aims to award a residency to one individual from each of the four categories: ceramics, photography, printmaking and social justice. Learn more.
Deadline: February 1, 2016

Image credit: Illustration of goat teaching dance in public domain.

Seth Lepore: Transforming Performing Arts Careers

Tuesday, October 20th, 2015

Performing artist, educator, and artist-advocate Seth Lepore has launched a crowdfunding campaign through HatchFund. He’s writing a new book, Ruthless Reciprocity, and wants to create a living document to transform the performing arts community.

The book will focus on building a career as a performing artist, entirely from an artist’s perspective. Based in part on Seth Lepore’s workshop “The Nuts and Bolts of Being a Performing Artist,” Ruthless Reciprocity will approach the current performing arts landscape from three vantage points: practical, community-driven, and future-of-the-field.

In keeping with the artist’s tech-savvy and community-driven approach, the e-book version of Ruthless Reciprocity will receive ongoing updates to reflect changes in the field.

Learn more about the project on its HatchFund page.

Related content:

Mapping Technology and Art-Making

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015

From the Smithsonian Libraries Tumblr

The Nonprofit Technology Network (NTEN) hosts a Nonprofit Arts Community of Practice, a place where people working at the intersection of the nonprofit arts sector and technology can share ideas, resources, and anything else that comes to mind.

Next call: September 22, 2015 at 2pm ET

How is mapping technology informing the narrative of art-making and ownership?

Join NTEN’s Nonprofit Arts Community of Practice for a conversation with arts organizations utilizing mapping technology on September 22 at 2pm ET (11am PT).

Learn about how Carnegie Museum of Art makes its provenance accessible and interactive and hear from HowlRound about their New Play Map, establishing new narratives about who theatermakers are and about how new theater and artists get supported.

Panelists
Jamie M. Gahlon, Senior Creative Producer, HowlRound
Neil Kulas, Web & Digital Media Manager, Carnegie Museum of Art
Brad Stephenson, Director of Marketing, Carnegie Museum of Art

Join the call: https://www.uberconference.com/ntencommunity

Optional dial in number: 866-853-1888 (No PIN needed)

Learn more about the Community of Practice’s conversations to date.

NTEN Communities of Practice center on themes that reflect both a specific programmatic focus and an ongoing opportunity for growth. They are supported by volunteer community organizers who agree to nurture and ignite conversation and engagement. You do not need to be a member of NTEN to participate.

The NTEN NonProfit Arts Community of Practice is a place to launch discussions, pose questions, share ideas and tools, and interact with others. To participate, create an NTEN profile and join the NonProfit Arts Community of Practice (which includes discussion board, event listings, resource libraries, etc.).

To connect on Twitter, use the hashtag #nptecharts

Image: gif from the Smithsonian Libraries Tumblr.

Vintage Vinyl Artist Opportunities

Tuesday, September 1st, 2015

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Poetry Entries are now being accepted for the Patricia Dobler Poetry Award is given annually to a woman poet over 40 years of age who has not published a book in any genre. The winner receives $1,000; publication in Voices From the Attic, the university’s literary journal; and round-trip transportation and lodging to give a reading at Carlow University with this year’s judge, Lynn Emanuel. Learn more.
Deadline: September 5, 2015

Media Art The Massachusetts Convention Center Authority (MCCA) and Boston Cyberarts are issuing the fifteenth call for media art to display on the Marquee at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center. They are looking for 30-second videos, animations, or computer-generated motion works by Massachusetts artists that push the creative limits of this 80-foot, seven-screen, three-sided LED sculpture. Learn more.
Deadline: September 7, 2015 (midnight)

Short Films Boston Open Screen, an open mic for film, encourages local filmmakers to bring their short films to screen at the next event at the Coolidge Corner Theatre in Brookline. Boston Open Screen will play any film on the big screen as long as it’s 10 minutes or under. More info and tech specs on the Facebook page.
September 8, 2015, 7-10 PM

Public Artists, Designers, Data Visualizers, Environmentalists Applications are now being considered for an Energy Feedback Sculpture at Harvard University. Selected applicants will be awarded funding to develop proposals to be considered for a major public art installation on campus. Learn more.
Deadline: September 14, 2015

Studios at MASS MoCA The Studios at MASS MoCA, a new program from Assets for Artists, offers two professional development tracks: artists can apply for self-directed professional development residencies of 1-4 weeks in length, and/or enroll in week-long “workshops-in-residence” with individual studio space and housing complemented by instructor-led programming. Enrollment is first-come, first-served. Learn more.
Deadline: September 14, 2015

Glass Artists The Workhouse Arts Center (WAF) has announced a call for entries for its 1st Annual Workhouse Glass National Exhibition 2015,  for functional and/or sculptural glass artworks. The juror is Maurine Littleton. Learn more.
Deadline: September 16, 2015

Crafts Artists Entries are now being accepted for the annual Smithsonian Craft Show,  a juried exhibition and sale of contemporary American crafts and design.  Artists are selected on the basis of the originality, artistic conception, and quality of their work. Learn more.
Deadline: September 20, 2015

Amherst/Pioneer Valley Writers Calling all writers in the Greater Amherst/Pioneer Valley region: Luminarium Dance’s “Amherst Storybook Project” is in its final stage. Using artwork from local artists, the company has created 12 fanciful images for a new children’s storybook. Writers are asked to choose an image, and write a poem or short story inspired by the scene. Submissions are completely free, and writers are welcome to submit as many entries as they wish. One submission per image will ultimately be chosen to be printed alongside the artwork in the final book, which will debut at the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art on November 8th. See images, learn more, and submit writing here.
Deadline: September 25, 2015, 5 PM

Dissertation Fellowships in American Art Applications are now being accepted for the Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art designated for graduate students in any stage of PhD dissertation research or writing. Stipend: $25,000, plus up to $2,000 as a travel allowance.
Learn more.
Deadline: October 21, 2015

Nominate a Jazz Master Fellowships of up to $25,000 are awarded to living individuals on the basis of nominations from the public including the jazz community. The NEA encourages nominations of a broad range of men and women who have been significant to the field of jazz, through vocals, instrumental performance, creative leadership, and education. Nominees must demonstrate significant contribution to the art form through their body of work in the field of jazz. Learn more.
Deadline: December 31, 2015

Image credit: Original image, via Smithsonian Libraries, from Academy sketches (1877).

Artist Opportunities Rehearsal

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

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She will she will rock you.

Of Note: Two-day Artist-in-Business training available to artists in three towns in Western Massachusetts in 2015-2016: Easthampton, Greenfield, and Springfield. Learn more.

Writers Fellowship Applications are now being accepted for the PEN Center USA Emerging Voices Fellowships. Fellowships of $1,000 each are given annually to emerging poets, fiction writers, and creative nonfiction writers who lack access to financial and creative support. Each fellow participates in an eight-month mentorship in Los Angeles with a professional writer, as well as classes at the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program, public readings, and other programming. Learn more.
Deadline: August 10, 2015

Poets Entries are now being accepted for Grayson Books Poetry Prize. Winner receives a prize of $1,000 and publication for a poetry collection. The judge is Mekeel McBride. Learn more.
Deadline: August 15, 2015

Call for Art The Warwick Museum of Art is currently accepting 2D and 3D entries for their 29th Annual RI Open Juried Exhibit. The juror is Francoise McAree. Awards: 2 Excellence Awards will be presented for $200.00 each; 4 non-cash Honorable Mentions will also be presented. Learn more.
Deadline: August 16, 2015 (5:00 pm)

Call for Projects ILLUMINUS is seeking project applications that cross disciplinary boundaries and engage a diverse public audience for exhibition at their 2015 Festival. They accept projects in any medium but give special consideration to the following categories: Light, Sound or Projection Installations; Audio Visual Performances; Interactive or Participatory Projects; and Experiential Art Installations. Learn more.
Deadline: August 20th, 2015 (11:59 PM)

Artist Residency Applications are now being accepted for the ArtCenter/South Florida’s Studio Residency Program. Ideal for artists who are committed to experimentation and innovation, seeking artistic & professional development. Artists’ are granted partially-subsidized studios at ArtCenter’s Miami Beach campus located in the heart of South Beach. Learn more.
Deadline: August 31, 2015

Find or list creative live/work or work space in Massachusetts with ArtSake’s Creative Space Classifieds.

Image credit: Photograph of woman with band in public domain.

Estate Planning for Artists

Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

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You don’t have walk alone or be Beatles rich to think about and plan for your estate.

Arts & Business Council of Greater Boston
Provides consulting services for issues related to legacy planning.

The Art Connection
Connects artists and donors to community service organizations through placement of original artwork.

The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation
A Visual Artist’s Guide to Estate Planning, a comprehensive handbook designed to assist artists in planning their estates.

POBA
Provides resources for individuals, institutions and estates wishing to develop and maintain creative legacies.

Image credit: Photograph by Annie Houston of a 2015 mural in Springfield, MA, of Beatles Abbey Road album cover art.


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